The 1861-1865 Civil War Places ClipArt gallery offers 182 illustrations of places that are famous due to battles or other events during the American Civil War.

"Surrender of Fort Macon, GA., April 26th, 1862. Exterior on side facing the Federal Batteries, showing effect of shot on the glacis and walls." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Macon

"Surrender of Fort Macon, GA., April 26th, 1862. Exterior on side facing the Federal Batteries, showing…

"Old Fort Norfolk, built by the Federal government, but altered and strengthened by the Confederates." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Norfolk

"Old Fort Norfolk, built by the Federal government, but altered and strengthened by the Confederates."…

"The harbor of Charleston, S. C.- Fort Pinckney."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Pinckney

"The harbor of Charleston, S. C.- Fort Pinckney."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Section of Fort Runyon, Va., guarding the road to Alexandria, occupied by the Twenty-first Regiment, New York Volunteers, August 1861. For Runyon, named after the commander of the New Jersey Regiments which were formerly stationed there, entirely commanded the road to Alexandria. Our sketch shows the battery erected on this important point. The spot was a most picturesque one, commanding a splendid view all around, the background being the Potomac and Washington." —Leslie, 1896

Fort Runyon

"Section of Fort Runyon, Va., guarding the road to Alexandria, occupied by the Twenty-first Regiment,…

Attack on Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter

Attack on Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter after its bombardment.

Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter after its bombardment.

Fort Sumter before the Civil War.

Fort Sumter

Fort Sumter before the Civil War.

The fort is best known as the site where the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at the Battle of Fort Sumter.

Fort Sumter

The fort is best known as the site where the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at…

The fort is best known as the site where the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at the Battle of Fort Sumter. Pictured here is Fort Sumter following the bombardment in 1864.

Inside the Walls of Fort Sumter

The fort is best known as the site where the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at…

The fort is best known as the site where the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at the Battle of Fort Sumter. Pictured here is Fort Sumter following the bombardment in 1864.

Fort Sumter in 1864

The fort is best known as the site where the shots initiating the American Civil War were fired, at…

"Fort Taylor, Key West, Fla. Key West, the most western of the Pine Islands, is about sixty miles southwest of Cape Sable, Florida. Its length is four miles, and its width is one mile. Its elevation from the sea does not exceed twenty feet. Its formation is of coral. The name is a corruption of Cago Hueso, or Bone Key, and has no relation to the position of the island, which is not the most western of the reef. On Whitehead's Point, the southwest extemity of the island, is a fixed light, eighty-three and a half feet above the level of the sea. Fort Taylor is a large, first-class fortification, commanding the harbor of Key West at its entrance. The foritication forms an irregular quadrangle, having three channel curtains. It is three hundred yards off the beach and on the southwest point of the island, and stands in a depth of seven or twelve feet of water. The foundation is granite, and the upper works are of brick. The scrap walls have a solidity of eight feet, rising forty feet above the water level. It is proyided with three tiers- two of casemate and one of barbette- and mounts one hundred and twenty-eight 10-inch Columbiad guns on the seaward front, and forty-five heavy pieces toward the beach."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Taylor

"Fort Taylor, Key West, Fla. Key West, the most western of the Pine Islands, is about sixty miles southwest…

Fort Taylor was built in 1845 in Key West, Florida and used in the American Civil War.

Fort Taylor, Key West

Fort Taylor was built in 1845 in Key West, Florida and used in the American Civil War.

"Bombardment and capture of Fort Thompson, thirteen guns, near New Berne, on the Neuse River, by the Federal gunboats of General Burnside's expedition, commanded by Commander S. C. Rowan, U. S. N., March 14th, 1862. Extract from the official report of General Burnside. 'Early on the morning of the 12th, the entire force started for New Berne, and that night anchored off the mouth of Slocum's Creek, some eighteen miles from New Berne, where I had decided to make a landing. The landing commenced by seven o'clock the next morning under cover of the naval fleet, and was effected with the greatest enthusiasm by the troops. After a toilsome march through the mud, the head of the column marched within a mile and a half of the enemy's stronghold at eight o'clock, a distance of twelve miles from the point of landing, where we bivouached for the night. At daylight on the morning of the 14th I ordered an advance of the whole division, and, after an engagement of four hours, we succeeded in carrying a continuous line of field-works of over a mile in length. The position was finally carried by a most gallant charge of our men, which enabled us to gain the rear of all the batteries between this point and New Berne, which was done by a rapid advance of the entire force up the main road and railroad, the naval fleet meantime pushing its way up the river, throwing their shots into the forts in front of us. The enemy, after retreating in great confusion across the railroad bridge set fire to it, thus preventing further pursuit and causing detention in occupying the town by our troops. But the naval force had arrived at the wharves and commanded the town with their guns."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Thompson

"Bombardment and capture of Fort Thompson, thirteen guns, near New Berne, on the Neuse River, by the…

"Fort Vulcan, Jones's Island, Savannah River, Ga.- one of the Federal batteries cutting off communication between Fort Pulaski and Savannah. This powerful battery was situated on Jones's Island, Savannah River, and was one of those erected by General Gilmore to cut off all communication between Fort Pulaski and the City of Savannah. It was built like all modern earthworks- perfectly bombproof magazine, heavy traverses and occupied a commanding position; was armed with four 8-inch sea-coast howitzers and give heavy guns on its water front."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Vulcan

"Fort Vulcan, Jones's Island, Savannah River, Ga.- one of the Federal batteries cutting off communication…

Fort Washington was the only defense that the capital had at the beginning of the Civil War.

Fort Washington

Fort Washington was the only defense that the capital had at the beginning of the Civil War.

State house in Fredricksburg.

State House, Fredricksburg VA

State house in Fredricksburg.

"Front Royal, Manassas Gap Railroad, Blue Ridge Mountains in the distance- the Federal army entering the town. Front Royal is situated on the Manassas Gap Railroad, on the banks of the Shenandoah, is ten miles from Strasburg and fifty-one miles from Manassas Junction. General Banks, at the head of his troops, dashed down the mountain and through the romantic village of Front Royal, which resounded with the rumble of wagons and clatter of hoofs, mingled with the music of the church bells calling to morning service. Hastening on toward the scene of conflict, to his surprise he brought up against his own pickets, and found that, instead of his own column, Fremont was upon the enemy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Front Royal

"Front Royal, Manassas Gap Railroad, Blue Ridge Mountains in the distance- the Federal army entering…

Mill, with a man standing and a man on horseback in the foreground.

Scene of the Battle of Gaines' Mill

Mill, with a man standing and a man on horseback in the foreground.

"Headquarters of General Butterfield, near Harrison's Landing, James River, Va." —Leslie, 1896

Headquarters of General Butterfield

"Headquarters of General Butterfield, near Harrison's Landing, James River, Va." —Leslie, 1896

"United States General Hospital, Hilton Head, S. C., exterior. The United States General Hospital at Hilton Head, S. C., was built very strongly of wood, and really had somewhat of an architectural appearance. It was about four hundred feet long, and had excellent accommodation for about five hundred patients. On the right hand of the hospital is the chief doctor's residence. Hilton Head, which is a very beautiful, fertile spot, was owned principally by General Drayton, who cultivated there that celebrated cotton known as Sea Island. The woods, which principally consist of orange, palmetto, pine and dwarf oaks, commence at about a mile from the sea. "— Frank Leslie, 1896

General Hospital Exterior

"United States General Hospital, Hilton Head, S. C., exterior. The United States General Hospital at…

"United States General Hospital, Hilton Head, S. C., interior. The United States General Hospital at Hilton Head, S. C., was built very strongly of wood, and really had somewhat of an architectural appearance. It was about four hundred feet long, and had excellent accommodation for about five hundred patients. On the right hand of the hospital is the chief doctor's residence. We also publish a view of one of the wards, taken shortly after the battle of James Island, where so many Federals fell- either killed or wounded. Hilton Head, which is a very beautiful, fertile spot, was owned principally by General Drayton, who cultivated there that celebrated cotton known as Sea island. The woods, which principally consist of orange, palmetto, pine and dwarf oaks, commence at about a mile from the sea."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General Hospital Interior

"United States General Hospital, Hilton Head, S. C., interior. The United States General Hospital at…

"The battlefield of Gettysburg- breastworks, Culp's Hill- Gettysburg in the distance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battlefield of Gettysburg

"The battlefield of Gettysburg- breastworks, Culp's Hill- Gettysburg in the distance."— Frank…

"Government buildings for 'Contrabands,' erected at Hilton Head, S. C., in 1862. Among the many singular questions that arose during the Civil War were, What was to be done with the contrabands? The government, from the first, took the only view a Christian one could take, and without encouraging their advent to our lines gave orders to receive them, as a mere question of humanity. Among the things which we owe to General Butler is the term contraband, and to his legal sagacity we are also indebted for the practical use to which they were applied. At Hilton Head they were employed to build fortifications, and after careful drilling made very efficient soldiers. Their numbers became so large that it necessitated the erection of new buildings for their accommodation. They were very comfortable and well ventilated, and had the great architectural merit of being perfectly adapted to their purpose."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Government buildings

"Government buildings for 'Contrabands,' erected at Hilton Head, S. C., in 1862. Among the many singular…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"The Great Bakery for the United States Army at the Capitol, Washington, D. C.- sketched by our special artist. The public buildings in Washington, during the threatened invasion by the Confederates, were barricaded and fortified. So great was the apprehension of a raid upon the city, that the passageways of the Treasury and the Captiol wre defended by howitzers. The iron plates cast for the dome of the Capitol were set up as breastworks between the columns, where they were supported by heavy timbers. The statuary and the pictures were protected by heaving planking; and the basement of the building was used as a kitchen. When the regiments began to pour in, the public buildings were given as quarters to the troops which came to defend them. The basement of the Capitol, which we illustrate, became first a storehouse, and then a bakery." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Great Bakery

"The Great Bakery for the United States Army at the Capitol, Washington, D. C.- sketched by our special…

A brick building, where a battle would later take place.

Hanover Courthouse, Virginia

A brick building, where a battle would later take place.

Harper's Ferry

Harper's Ferry

Harper's Ferry

The town of Harper's Ferry, where an important Civil War battle was fought in 1862.

View of Harper's Ferry, 1862, Looking South

The town of Harper's Ferry, where an important Civil War battle was fought in 1862.

The burning of the arsenal in Harper's Ferry during the American Civil War

Burning of the Arsenal at Harper's Ferry

The burning of the arsenal in Harper's Ferry during the American Civil War

"The old Harrison Mansion, Harrison's Landing, Va., the birthplace of President William Henry Harrison, used as a hospital and the headquarters of the signal corps. This old-fashioned residence was situated at Berkeley, on the banks of the James River, only a few hundred yards from the water. It was constructed of brick and surrounded by a grove of poplar and other trees. Here, on February 9th, 1773, William Henry Harrison, ninth President of the United States, was born, and for this it remained famous till it became of still higher historical interest by being selected as the <em>point d'appui</em> of General McClellan's army, and the chief landing place of all its stores. It was at once chosen for hospital purposes, and upon its roof the Signal Corps erected a tower for the survey of the surrounding country."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Harrison Mansion

"The old Harrison Mansion, Harrison's Landing, Va., the birthplace of President William Henry Harrison,…

"Harrison's Landing, James River, Va. The commissariat depot and base of operations of General McClellan occupied by the Federal Army, July 1st, 1862. Our correspondent wrote: 'The Army of the Potomac has been compelled to fall back from before Richmond to a place of safety under the armament of the gunboats on the James River. The advance of our army, which ten days ago, was within sight of the steeples of the Confederate Capital, is now twenty-five miles distant. General McClellan has transferred his base of operations from the Pamunky River to a more advantageous position on the James River, and his camps from the pestilent swamps of the Chickahominy to the higher and healthier grounds of Harrison's Landing.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Harrison's Landing

"Harrison's Landing, James River, Va. The commissariat depot and base of operations of General McClellan…

View of the camp of the twentieth Indiana Regiment; also of Fort Hatteras and the anchorage at Hatteras inlet, N.C. This camp, was formed when Federal troops occupied the island. It first recieved Colonel Bendix and his German regiment. On their return to Newport News it was taken possession of by the Ninth Zouaves; who vacated it upon the arrival of the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, October 5, 1861, the Ninth removing to Camp Wool.

Fort Hatteras

View of the camp of the twentieth Indiana Regiment; also of Fort Hatteras and the anchorage at Hatteras…

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces under General Sherman, 1861-2. Our illustration of the Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., embrace the following points of interest: Signal Station for telegraphing to beaufort, Bay Point, etc; post office, formerly old confederate barn; Captan Hascell's office and storehouses; old Confederate building; storehouse for ammunition; unfinished dwelling; boxes filled with shot and shell; heavy shot; temporary wharf; siege gun-carriages; building permanent wharf; heavy columbiads; armories department, and part of the stone fleet. This sketch cannot fail to be generally interesting, more especially to those who had friends or relatives in this expedition, or participated in it themselves. The buildings were unpleasantly significant to the secessionists that the Federal troops had come to stay." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Hilton Head

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces…

"Exterior view of fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Hilton Head, Port Royal. S. C. Hilton Head is from five to seven miles in width, and about fifteen miles long. The fortifications which we illustrate were built under the direction of Captain Gilmore of the engineers. A correspondent observes of them: 'According to the lay of the land here, there is a space of about half a mile between the woods on the outskirts of our camp, which runs all along the beach to within five hundred yards of the fort, before you come to the bayou or creek, and extends about one mile distant inland from the beach. Here Captain Gilmore has dug an entrenchment reaching over and filling the entire space between the woods and the bayou, which makes us completely shaded from any enemy who might try to surprise us or retake the fort.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Hilton Head

"Exterior view of fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Hilton Head, Port Royal. S. C. Hilton…

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces under General Sherman, 1861-2. Our illustration of the Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., embrace the following points of interest: Commissary's Quarters, built by the Confederates; Post Sutler's, built by the Confederates; Camp of the Eighth Main Regiment; butcher's yard; Camp of the Third New Hampshire regiment; Camp of the Forty-eighth New York regiment; Camp of the Forty-seventh New York regiment; Provost Marshal Major Beard's quarters and Provost Marshal's guard; General Viele's headquarter's; General Sherman's headquarters; Captain Pothouse's (Assistant Adjutant-general) headquarters; lodging house, built by the Confederates; bakery; unfinished building; Captain Saxton's office, and other Government offices, formerly Generals Drayton and Wright's headquarters." —Leslie, 1896

Hilton Head

"Expedition to Port Royal- Government buildings erected on Hilton Head, S. C., by the Federal forces…

"General Hooker's headquarters at Chancellorville, May 1st."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Hooker's Headquarters

"General Hooker's headquarters at Chancellorville, May 1st."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The war in Virginia- hospital scene after the Battle of Bristoe Station."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

hospital

"The war in Virginia- hospital scene after the Battle of Bristoe Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special artist sent us some sketches which belond more to the romance of war than its struggle. While, as though to show the folly and vanity of the whole gigantic struggle, the dead horse, the vultures, and the last two of the army cavalcade as it travels over that magnificent sollitude, the Hundred Mile Prairie of Missouri, close the melancholy series."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Hundred Mile Prairie

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special…

Island Number Ten was a former island in the Mississippi River near Tiptonville, Tennessee and the site of a major eponymous battle in the American Civil War.

Island Number Ten

Island Number Ten was a former island in the Mississippi River near Tiptonville, Tennessee and the site…

Island Number Ten was a former island in the Mississippi River near Tiptonville, Tennessee and the site of a major eponymous battle in the American Civil War.

Bombardment of Island Number Ten

Island Number Ten was a former island in the Mississippi River near Tiptonville, Tennessee and the site…

"Tybee Island, Savannah River, Ga.- Views of the lighthouse and barracks- destruction of the lighthouse by the Confederates. Among the numerous structures erected by the United States on the long line of the stormy Atlantic coast for the benefit of the commerce of the world and the safety of the mariners of all nations, none were finer or more useful than the lighthouse on Tybee Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River, familiarly known to sailors as Tybee Light. It was a fixed light, one hundred and eight feet high, and could be seen at a distance of twelve miles. In common with all the other lights on the Confederate coast, it was extinguished by the Georgians soon after the secession of their State. The day after the Federal fleet made its appearance off the mouth of the Savannah River, the Confederates set fire to the interior of the lighthouse, which was burnt, and the costly reflectors destroyed. A similar vandalic measure was resorted to by the Confederates of Charleston, when the Stone Fleet appeared off that harbor. They blew up the celebrated 'Charleston Light.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Tybee Island

"Tybee Island, Savannah River, Ga.- Views of the lighthouse and barracks- destruction of the lighthouse…

The Battle of Iuka was an American Civil War battle fought on September 19, 1862, in Iuka, Mississippi.

Iuka Springs, 1862

The Battle of Iuka was an American Civil War battle fought on September 19, 1862, in Iuka, Mississippi.

"Sheridan's campaign in the valley of the Shenandoah- view of the front from the Federal lines on Jackson Hill, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Jackson Hill

"Sheridan's campaign in the valley of the Shenandoah- view of the front from the Federal lines on Jackson…

"Jefferson City, capital of Missouri. The arrival of General Fremont's division, September 26th, 1861. Our sketch of Jefferson City was taken from the southern side of Missouri, and shows the Capitol in bold relief. The railroad runs along the side of the river to Tipton and Sedalia, at both of which places General Fremont established camps and concentrated a large force preparatory to crossing the Osage in pursuit of General Sterling Price." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Jefferson City

"Jefferson City, capital of Missouri. The arrival of General Fremont's division, September 26th, 1861.…

"Jefferson City, capital of Missouri. The arrival of General Fremont's division, September 26th, 1861. Our sketch of Jefferson City was taken from the southern side of Missouri, and shows the Capitol in bold relief. The railroad runs along the side of the river to Tipton and Sedalia, at both of which places General Fremont established camps and concentrated a large force preparatory to crossing the Osage in pursuit of General Sterling Price." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Jefferson City

"Jefferson City, capital of Missouri. The arrival of General Fremont's division, September 26th, 1861.…

"Jefferson City, capital of Missouri. The arrival of General Fremont's division, September 26th, 1861. Our sketch of Jefferson City was taken from the southern side of Missouri, and shows the Capitol in bold relief. The railroad runs along the side of the river to Tipton and Sedalia, at both of which places General Fremont established camps and concentrated a large force preparatory to crossing the Osage in pursuit of General Sterling Price." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Jefferson City

"Jefferson City, capital of Missouri. The arrival of General Fremont's division, September 26th, 1861.…

The place where Johnston surrendered to Sherman in the American Civil War.

Place of Johnston's Surrender to Sherman

The place where Johnston surrendered to Sherman in the American Civil War.

"Kelley's Ford, on the Rappahannock, the scene of the Battle of the 17th of March, and of General Stoneman's reconnoissance of the 21st of April, 1863."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Kelley's Ford

"Kelley's Ford, on the Rappahannock, the scene of the Battle of the 17th of March, and of General Stoneman's…

Kennesaw Mountain was the site of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain during the 1864 Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War.

View of Kenesaw from Pine Mountain

Kennesaw Mountain was the site of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain during the 1864 Atlanta Campaign of…

"Killing's Cave, on the banks of the Potomac, near Sharpsburg, the place of refuge of many citizens during the battle of Antietam. A glance at the map of the battle of Antietam will enable our readers to perceive how terribly exposed the little town of Sharpsburg was during the conflict, situated as it was almost between two fires; for, however anxious the Federal generals might be to spare the town, it was impossible to prevent many of the shot and shell from falling into its midst. In the cellar of the Kretzer mansion were congregated men, women and children, all spellbound as they listened to the terrible thunder of the battle. They could tell by the whiz and the awful explosions every now and then how near to them was the work of destruction; and their terror rose to perfect agony whe a shell exploded before one of the opening which gave them a dim light and was the chief means of ventiliation in this chamber of horrors. Of a similar character is our sketch of the cave of refuge near Sharpsburg, and situated on the banks of the Potomac."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Killing's Cave

"Killing's Cave, on the banks of the Potomac, near Sharpsburg, the place of refuge of many citizens…

"The war in Louisiana- General Franklin's army crossing the prairie in Lafayette Parish, November 16th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Lafayette Parish

"The war in Louisiana- General Franklin's army crossing the prairie in Lafayette Parish, November 16th,…

"Lake Providence, La., headquarters of General McPherson and the Federal division under his command. Our artist wrote: 'The Seventeenth Army Corps, under General McPherson, have been exceedingly fortunate in being ordered to Lake Providence, La. Their tents are pitched in pleasant places. I have not seen a position anywhere along the Mississippi River, or anywhere else, which offers such inducements for any army 'to stay awhile' as the banks of this beautiful lake. There is a little town on the landing, which is only fit for, and therefore only occupied by, negro quarters and sutler shops. The lake is immediately back of the village, and not more than a quarter of a mile from the river. Immense cotton fields stretch away on both sides of it, and beautiful residences, surrounded by elaborate gardens full of Southern shrubbery, adorn its banks.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Lake Providence

"Lake Providence, La., headquarters of General McPherson and the Federal division under his command.…

"The headquarters of General Lee at Gettysburg."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Lee headquarters

"The headquarters of General Lee at Gettysburg."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The solitary hydrant in Libby prison."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Libby prison

"The solitary hydrant in Libby prison."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Libby Prison, Richmond, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Libby prison

"Libby Prison, Richmond, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Interior of Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., with prisoners from General Lee's army confined after the surrender. Our sketch represents the interior of Libby Prison filled with Confederate prisoners, among whom were over one hundred of the most desperate criminals in the South, being convicts who were released from jail on condition of serving in the Confederate ranks."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Interior of Libby Prison

"Interior of Libby Prison, Richmond, Va., with prisoners from General Lee's army confined after the…

Libby Prison was a Confederate Prison at Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War.

Libby Prison, Richmond

Libby Prison was a Confederate Prison at Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War.