The 1861-1865 Civil War Naval Battles ClipArt gallery includes 89 illustrations of naval battles that were fought between the Union and Confederacy during the American Civil War.

"The attack upon the batteries at the entrance of Acquia Creek, Potomac River, by the United States vessels <em>Pawnee</em>, <em>Yankee</em>, <em>Thomas Freeborn</em>, <em>Anacosta</em>, and <em>Resolute</em>, June 1st, 1861. On May 31st Captain Ward, in command on board of the <em>Thomas Freeborn</em>, and assisted by two more of his gunboats, the <em>Resolute</em> and the <em>Anacosta</em>, began the attack on the Confederate batteries, and after a two hours' fight, succeeded in silencing the batteries at the landing; but, for want of long-range ammunition, could not effectually respond to the heavy fire from the heights, and so had to withdraw. The following day, however, with aditional aid from the <em>Pawnee</em> and <em>Yankee</em>, the attack was resumed, and the batteries were at last silenced and the Confederates compelled to retreat."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Acquia Creek

"The attack upon the batteries at the entrance of Acquia Creek, Potomac River, by the United States…

"The sinking of the <em>Alabama</em>."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Alabama

"The sinking of the Alabama."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

The Alabama was a Confederate man-of-war built by the British. It served as a commerce raider attacking Union ships.

The Alabama

The Alabama was a Confederate man-of-war built by the British. It served as a commerce raider attacking…

William Barker Cushing was an officer in the United States Navy, best known for sinking the Confederate ironclad CSS Albemarle during a daring nighttime raid on October 27, 1864.

Destruction of the Albemarle

William Barker Cushing was an officer in the United States Navy, best known for sinking the Confederate…

"The anglo-Confederate steamer <em>Anglia</em>, captured off Bull's Bay, twenty-five miles north of Charleston, S. C., by the United States gunboats <em>Restless</em> and <em>Flag</em>, Sunday, October 19th, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Anglia

"The anglo-Confederate steamer Anglia, captured off Bull's Bay, twenty-five miles north of…

"Capture of the British steamer <em>Anne</em> laden with arms and munition of war for the Confederates, by the United States gunboat <em>Kanawha</em>, acting master partridge, from under the guns of Fort Morgan, Mobile, June 29th, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Anne

"Capture of the British steamer Anne laden with arms and munition of war for the Confederates,…

"Capture of the United States mail steamer <em>Ariel</em>, Captain Jones, off the east end of Cuba, by the pirate <em>Alabama</em> ('290'), Captain Semmes, December 7th, 1862. Report of the first officer of the <em>Ariel</em>: 'On the 7th of December, at 1:30 P.M., when rounding Cape Maysi, the eastern point of Cuba, we saw a vessel about four miles to the westward, close under the high land, bark-rigged and under canvas. As there was nothing in her appearance indicating her to be a steamer, her smokepipe being down, no suspicions were aroused until in a short time we saw she had furled her sails, raised her smokestack, and was rapidly nearing us under steam, the American flag flying at her peak. Such was her speed in comparison to ours that in about half an hour she had come up within half a mile of us, when she fired a lee gun, hauled down the American ensign and ran up the Confederate flag. No attention was paid to the summons, and the <em>Ariel</em> was pushed to her utmost speed. She then sailed across our wake, took a position on our port quarter, about four hundred yards distant, and fired two guns almost simultaneously, one shot passing over the hurricane deck, and the other hitting the foremast and cutting it half away. A body of United States marines, consisting of 126 men, passengers on board the <em>Ariel</em>, had been drawn up and armed, but the officers in command deemed it worse than folly to resist, as we could plainly see they were training a full broadside to bear upon us, and Captain Jones gave orders to stop the ship and haul down the ensign.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Ariel

"Capture of the United States mail steamer Ariel, Captain Jones, off the east end of Cuba,…

"Capture of the Anglo-Confederate steamer <em>Aries</em> off Bull's Bay, near Charleston, S. C., by the United States gunboat <em>Stettin</em>."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Aries

"Capture of the Anglo-Confederate steamer Aries off Bull's Bay, near Charleston, S. C., by…

Destruction of the <em>Arkansas</em> during the Battle of Baton Rouge naval battle.

Destruction of the Arkansas

Destruction of the Arkansas during the Battle of Baton Rouge naval battle.

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the hurricane deck of the United States transport <em>North Star</em>- the soldiers of the Forty-first Massachusetts Regiment writing home to their friends, upon their arrival at ship island, Gulf of Mexico. We publish a sketch taken on the evening of the arrival of the Forty-first Massachusetts Regiment at Ship Island. The thoughts of the dear ones at home were uppermost in every soldier's mind, and in a very short time the hurricane deck of the steamer <em>North Star</em> was occupied by a regiment of letterwriters, all hard at work in the service of Cadmus. It is only those separated from all they hold dear who can realize the luxury of that invention which wafts a sigh from Indus to the Pole."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Banks Expedition

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the hurricane deck of the United States transport North Star-…

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the levee, Baton Rouge, La. Contrabands unloading military stores from the United States transport <em>North Star</em>, over the Mississippi steamer <em>Iberville</em>. The <em>Iberville</em> had quite a history in connection with the military operations on the Mississippi. She was taken possession of by the United States authorities on the surrender of New Orleans, and was engaged as a transport during the expedition. She several times ran the gantlet of Confederate batteries and guerrillas. On one occasion she sustained a running fire from a battery of six guns for at least twenty minutes, while passing Donaldsonville, having four men killed and four wounded, one of her engines disabled and her upper works riddled."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Banks Expedition

"The Banks Expedition- scene on the levee, Baton Rouge, La. Contrabands unloading military stores from…

"Banks's Expedition- Executive Officer Parker, of the United States gunboat <em>Essex</em>, hoisting the national standard on the state capitol, Baton Rouge, La., on its occupation by the Federal forces commanded by General Grover, December 17th, 1863."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Banks's Expedition

"Banks's Expedition- Executive Officer Parker, of the United States gunboat Essex, hoisting…

"Banks's Expedition- burning of the state capitol of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, Tuesday night, December 30th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Baton Rouge

"Banks's Expedition- burning of the state capitol of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, Tuesday night, December…

"Burning of the American merchantman "Harvey Birch," of New York, Captain Nelson, in the British Channel, by the Confederate Steamer "Nashville," Captain Peagrim, November 17th, 1861. On the 17th of November, 1861, the "Harvey Birch," a splendid New York vessel of 1,480 tons and valued at $150,000, was on her way from Havre to New York in ballast, commanded by Captain Nelson, with officers and crew, all told, twenty-nine men. In latitude 49.6 north, longitude 9.52 west, she was brought to by the Confederate steamer "Nashville," and boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who took the crew of the "Birch" on board the "Nashville," robbed the vessel of everything valuable, and then set fire to it, the commander, Peagrim, watching her destruction from his own deck." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Harvey Birch

"Burning of the American merchantman "Harvey Birch," of New York, Captain Nelson, in the British Channel,…

"The Banks Expedition- a Confederate Schooner running into the United States transport <em>Che-Kiang</em>, off the Florida reefs, on the night of December 11th, 1862, with the intention of sinking her. On the night of December 11th, 1862, as the United States transport <em>Che-Kiang</em>, laden with troops, was off the Florida Reefs, a schooner supposed to be a Confederate one, ran at full sail against the <em>Che-Kiang</em>. As the latter vessel was painted white and had no lights burning, there can be little doubt it was a daring and desperate attempt to wreck the transport, more especially as the schooner's crew, immediately after the collision, put off into a boat and rowed away with all expedition. After disengaging herself from the sinking schooner the <em>Che-Kiang</em> pursued her way, and reached Ship Island in such a leaky condition that the troops had to be landed."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Che-Kiang

"The Banks Expedition- a Confederate Schooner running into the United States transport Che-Kiang,…

"The naval victory off Cherbourg, France, June 19th, 1864- the pirate <em>Alabama</em> Captain Semmes, sunk after an engagement of one hour by the United States steamer <em>Kearsarge</em>, Captain Winslow."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Victory off Cherbourg

"The naval victory off Cherbourg, France, June 19th, 1864- the pirate Alabama Captain Semmes,…

"The war in Virginia. Explosion of a torpedo under the <em>Commodore Barney</em>, on James River, August 4th, 1863. A reconnoissance was made up James River, on the 4th of August, 1863, by the gunboats <em>Commodore Barney</em>, <em>Sangamon</em> and <em>Cohasset</em>, nearly up to Drury's Bluff. General H. M. Naglee, commander of the Seventh Army Corps, was on board the <em>John Faron</em> and obtained much important information. Near Aiken's Landing they were annoyed by sharpshooters, but when within six miles of Fort Darling a torpedo exploded under the bow of the <em>Commodore Barney</em>. It must have been of immense force, as the steamer was lifted ten feet out of the water, and swept by a jet of water which was hurled fifty feet in the air, and then fell with deluging effect on the deck, carrying thirty men overboard. These were all saved except two, but the <em>Barney</em> was too much disabled to proceed, and, being taken in tow, the fleet dropped down. At Turkey Island they were joined by the <em>General Jasap</em> and compelled to run the gantlet of a severe artillery fire from the shore. Our sketch of the accident to the <em>Barney</em> may seem an exaggeration, but is attested by persons who were present as being literally and really accurate."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Commodore Barney

"The war in Virginia. Explosion of a torpedo under the Commodore Barney, on James River, August…

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the Federal fleet." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Confederate gunboats

"Burning of the Confederate gunboats, rams, etc., at New Orleans and Algiers, on the approach of the…

"The sinking of the frigate <em>Cumberland</em> by the <em>Merrimac</em> in Hampton Roads, March 8, 1862."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Cumberland

"The sinking of the frigate Cumberland by the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, March 8,…

Destruction of the Confederate cruiser Alabama at Cherbourg, France.

Destruction of the Alabama

Destruction of the Confederate cruiser Alabama at Cherbourg, France.

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, and the Federal wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>- sinking of the <em>Cumberland</em> by a blow from the <em>Merrimac</em>, March 8th, 1862- sketched by our special artist. About noon on the 8th, a suspicious-looking vessel, looking like a submerged house, with the roof only above water, was discovered, moving down from Norfolk, by the channel in front of Sewall's Point batteries. There was nothing protruding above the water but a flagstaff flying the Confederate flag and a short smokestack. She moved along slowly, and turned into the channel leading to Newport News, and steamed direct for the wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which were lying at the mouth of James River. As soon as she came within range of the <em>Cumberland</em>, the latter opened on her with her heavy guns; but the balls struck and glanced off without effect. In the meantime, as the <em>Merrimac</em> was approaching the two frigates on one side, the Confederate ironclad steamers <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> came down James River, and engaged the frigates on the other side. The batteries at Newport News also opened on the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em>, and did all in their power to assist the <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which, being sailing vessels, were at the mercy of the approaching steamers. The <em>Merrimac</em>, in the meantime, kept steadily on her course, and slowly approached the <em>Cumberland</em>, when she and the <em>Congress</em>, at a distance of one hundred yards, rained full broadsides on the ironclad monters without effect. After receiving the first broadside of the two frigates, she ran on to the <em>Cumberland</em>, striking her about midship, and literally laying open her bow, left her to sink, while she engaged the <em>Congress</em>, which lay about a quarter of a mile distant. The <em>Congress</em>, having no regular crew on board of her, and seeing the hopelessness of resisting the ironclad steamer, at once struck her colors." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First naval battle

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers Merrimac, Yorktown,…

The landing of troops at Fort Fisher during the American Civil War.

Landing Troops at Fort Fisher

The landing of troops at Fort Fisher during the American Civil War.

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote, February 6th, 1862. Flag Officer Foote's official report- United States Flagship Cincinatti, off Fort Henry, Tennessee River, February 6th, 1862: 'The gunboats under my command- the <em>Essex</em>, Commander Porter; the <em>Carondelet</em>, Commander Walker; the <em>Cincinnati</em>, Commander Stembel; the <em>St. Louis</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Paulding; the <em>Conestoga</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Phelps; the <em>Taylor</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Gwin; and the <em>Lexington</em>, Lieutenant Commanding Shirk. After a severe and rapid fire of one hour and a quarter, have captured Fort Henry and have taken General Lloyd Tilghman and his staff as prisoners. The surrender to the gunboats was unconditional, as we kept an open fire upon the enemy until their flag was struck. In half an hour after the surrender I handed the fort and the prisoners over to General Grant, commanding the army, on his arrival at the fort in force. The <em>Essex</em> had a shot in her boiler, after fighting most effectually for two thirds of the action, and was obliged to drop down the river. She, with the other gunboats, officers and men, fought with the greatest gallantry. The <em>Cincinnati</em> received thirty-one shots and had one man killed and eight wounded, two seriously. The fort, with twenty guns and seventeen mortars, was defended by General Tilghman with the most determined gallantry.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Fort Henry

"Bombardment of Fort Henry, Tennessee River, Tenn., by the Mississippi Flotilla, Flag Officer Foote,…

"The investment of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, Ark., by the Federal troops under General McClernand, and its bombardment by the Federal gunboats commanded by Rear Admiral D. D. Porter, January 11th, 1863. Fort Hindman was what is known in military parlance as a star fort, with four angles- two on the river and two extending nearly to the morass in the rear. In front of the southwestern angle was a cluster of small houses, into which the enemy had thrown their sharpshooters, and from which a most galling fire was poured upon Burbridge's brigade, which stormed them and carried them by assault. At the given signal, on went the splendid brigade with a shout and a yell, now floundering like bemired horses in the morass, then pausing to dress their lines as if on parade, and anon charging again, regardless of the storm of grape and shell, shot and canister that pelted pitilessly around them. For three long hours they fought ere the houses were carried and made to screen the Federal troops. All that while sharpshooters were picking off, from their secure hiding places, officers and men; 10-pound Parrotts were sending their hissing messengers of death through the lines of the devoted brigade, crushing its bones, spattering its brains, and strewing its path with mangeled corpses and dying men. At last the houses were gained and occupied by the Eighty-third Ohio, which, with the Ninety-sixth Ohio, the Sixteenth, the Sixtieth and Sixty-seventh Indiana and the Twenty-third Wisconsin, had fought for them so gallantly."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hindman

"The investment of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, Ark., by the Federal troops under General McClernand,…

An illustration of the defense at Fort Sumter.

Defense at Fort Sumter

An illustration of the defense at Fort Sumter.

Depiction of the battle on the Mississippi between Confederate and Union forces at Forts Jackson and St. Philip.

Passage of Forts Jackson and St. Phillip

Depiction of the battle on the Mississippi between Confederate and Union forces at Forts Jackson and…

"Shelling of the batteries at Galveston by the United States war steamer <em>South Carolina</em>, on Monday afternoon, August 5th, 1861." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Galveston

"Shelling of the batteries at Galveston by the United States war steamer South Carolina, on…

"Desperate engagement, april 24th, 1862, between the United States gunboat "Varuna," Commander Boggs, and the Confederate steam ram "J. C. Breckinridge," and the gunboat "Governor Moore." Captain Boggs of the "Varuna," finding that the Confederate ram "J. C. Breckinridge" was about to run into him, put the vessel in such a position that in being damaged he could repay it with interest. On came the ram, all clad with iron about the bow, and hit the "Varuna" in the port waist, cutting and crushing in her side. she dropped alongside and cleared out to butt again. She hit the "Varuna" a second time, and while in a sinking condition the "Varuna" poured her 8-inch shells into her so fast that the Confederate was set on fire and driven on shore." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Gunboat collision

"Desperate engagement, april 24th, 1862, between the United States gunboat "Varuna," Commander Boggs,…

"Engagement between the United States gunboats, commanded by Commodore Davis, and the Confederate Mosquito Fleet, under Commodore Tatnall, near Fort Pulaski, Savannah River, January 28th, 1862. Our artist described this spirited sketch as follows: 'On Monday night Lieutenant Barnes was dispatched in the <em>Ottawa's</em> gig to scout up the creek and report. Passing the piles with ease, he pulled silently up the stream with muffled oars, and with no opposition succeeded in reaching the mouth of the creek where it enters the Savannah River. He came upon the fleet of Tatnall lying there, and approached near enough to see the watch on deck. As he was too near them in case they discovered him, and as he had accomplished the object of reconnoisance, he returned and reported the facts to Captain Davis. On Tuesday forenoon Tatnall's fleet was again discovered standing down the Savannah. We beat to quarters, and when the flagship had got within range we opened on her with an eleven-inch gun from the <em>Ottawa</em>. The signal for action having been given, the gunboats opened fire. The Confederates returned a few shots, which fell short. The engagement lasted nearly two hours, during which time the Confederate Flagship was struck three times, seriously damaging her. One eleven-inch shell struck her on her wheelhouse, and so much disabled her as to compel the commander to signal for assistance, and one steamer turned round and went to her aid. The other three steamed down toward Fort Pulaski faster than they ever went before.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Gunboat engagement

"Engagement between the United States gunboats, commanded by Commodore Davis, and the Confederate Mosquito…

Gunboat fight during the Civil War.

Gunboat Fight

Gunboat fight during the Civil War.

A gunboat of the Mississippi. Gunboats <I>Essex, Carondelete, Cincinnati, St. Louis, </I> and <I>Benton</I> steamed up to the levee at Cairo during the Civil War.

Gunboat of the Mississippi

A gunboat of the Mississippi. Gunboats Essex, Carondelete, Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Benton steamed…

The Yazoo River was of major importance during the American Civil War. The first electrically detonated underwater mine was used on the river in 1862 near Vicksburg to sink the Union ironclad USS Cairo. The last section of the Cairo was raised on December 12, 1964. It has been restored and is now on permanent display to the public at the Vicksburg National Military Park. There are 29 sunken ships from the Civil War beneath the waters of the river.

Gunboats Ascending the Yazoo River

The Yazoo River was of major importance during the American Civil War. The first electrically detonated…

The gunboats shooting at Fort Henry in western Tennessee.

Gunboats at Fort Henry

The gunboats shooting at Fort Henry in western Tennessee.

"Daring and desperate attack- surprise and capture of the United States gunboat <em>Harriet Lane</em> by the Confederates under General Magruder, and destruction of the flagship <em>Westfield</em>, in Galveston Harbor, Tex., January 1st, 1863. About two o'clock in the morning of January 1st, 1863, the Federal gunboats were attacked by five Confederate steamers, protected by double rows of bales of cotton, and loaded with troops armed with rifles, muskets, etc. The <em>Harriet Lane</em> was captured by boarding, after about all her officers, including Captain Wainwright and Lieutenant Commander Lee, and a crew of 130, all told, had been killed by muskettry from the Confederate steamers. The gunboats <em>Clifton</em> and <em>Owasco</em> were engaged and escaped, the former losing no men and but one wounded. The <em>Owasco</em> lost one killed and fifteen wounded. Two barks, loaded with coal, fell into the hands of the Confederates. The <em>Westfield</em> (flagship, Commodore Renshaw) was not engaged, being ashore in another channel. Her crew were transferred to transports, and Commodore Renshaw, fearing she would fall into the hands of the Confederates, blew her up. By some mismanagement or accident the exploion took place before a boat containing Commodore Renshaw, First Lieutenant Zimmerman and the boat's crew got away, and they were blown up with the ship. The Confederate force was estimated at 5,000, under the command of General Magruder. The Federal land force, under the command of Colonel Burrill, of Masschusetts, did not exceed 300, the residue not having disembarked at the time of the fight. The Federal loss was 160 killed and 200 taken prisoners. The navy suffered the most. The Confederate loss was much greater, as the Federal guns were firing grape and canister continually in their midst."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Harriet Lane

"Daring and desperate attack- surprise and capture of the United States gunboat Harriet Lane

"Bombardment of Port Hudsonby Admiral Farragut's fleet."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Port Hudsonby

"Bombardment of Port Hudsonby Admiral Farragut's fleet."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Terrible effect of a discharge of grape from Fort Jackson on the Federal gunboat <em>Iroquois</em>, Captain de Camp, April 24th, 1862, which killed eight and wounded seven seamen, out of a dahlgren gun's crew of twenty-five men, under Lieutenant McNair. One of the most terrible events of this desperate battle was the slaughter on board the gunboat <em>Iroquois</em>. In the midst of the engagement of the 24th of April, 1862, a discharge of grape from Fort Jackson killed eight and wounded seven, out of a gun's crew of twenty-five men, at the same minute. A spectator of the horrible scene told our artist it was one of the most appalling things he had ever seen, but it only nerved the survivors to renewed exertions. Lieutenant McNair fought his gun with great gallantry, and was one of those who escaped."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Iroquois

"Terrible effect of a discharge of grape from Fort Jackson on the Federal gunboat Iroquois,…

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal mortar boats and gunboats, March 17th, 1862. From a sketch by our special artist Mr. H. Lovie, on board the gunboat "Conestoga." On the 16th of March, 1862, the mortar fleet and the gunboats, consisting of the <em>Cincinnati, Pittsburg, St. Louis, Silver Wave, Carondelet, Mount City, Conestoga, Louisville, Rob Roy, Alps, Wilson, Lake Erie, Great Western</em> and <em>Torrence</em>, and nine mortar boats, arrived near the Point. These were accompanied by several tugboats. On the same day they opened fire, which, after some hours' delay, was returned by the Confederate batteries. This continued for several days, with very small loss to the Federal side, owing to the iron casing of the vessels engaged, and a superior range." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Island No. 10

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal…

"Bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip- the United States squadron, under Farragut, engaging the Confederate forts and fleet on its way to New Orleans, April 24th, 1862. The enemy's losses: In addition to the loss of their forts- Jackson, St. Philip, Pike, Chalmette, etc.- eighteen of their gunboats were destroyed, three iron rams, several floating batteries, booms, torpedoes, etc. The famous Hollins's ram <em>Manassas</em> was riddled, and, floating down a disabled wreck, it was destroyed by Porter's mortar fleet."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Jackson

"Bombardment of Forts Jackson and St. Philip- the United States squadron, under Farragut, engaging the…

The sinking of the Alabama by the Union Kearsarge. Some Confederates aboard the Alabama escaped to England aboard the nearby British yacht Deerhound.

Kearsarge Sinking the Alabama

The sinking of the Alabama by the Union Kearsarge. Some Confederates aboard the Alabama escaped to England…

"Bombardment of Fort McAllister, Ogeechee River, Ga., by the union ironclads <em>Patapsco</em>, <em>Passaic</em> and <em>Nahant</em>, Tuesday, March 5th 1863."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort McAllister

"Bombardment of Fort McAllister, Ogeechee River, Ga., by the union ironclads Patapsco, Passaic

The Merrimac sinking the Cumberland.

Merrimac

The Merrimac sinking the Cumberland.

"Destruction of the Confederate ironclad steamer <em>Merrimac</em>, blown up by its commander, on the morning of May 11th, 1862. The abandonment of Norfolk compelled the evacuation of the Confederate positions at Sewell's Point and at Crany Island, and on May 11th, 1862, the <em>Merrimac</em> was blown up to prevent her falling into the hands of the Federals. The Federal officers who witnessed the burning and blowing up of the <em>Merrimac</em> described the scene as one of the grandest imaginable. For nearly an hour before the explosion the roof was red hot, and at short intervals the guns would discharge themselves, solemnly breking in upon the stillness of the night. Just at the first dawn of daylight the whole black mass heaved upward, then came the report, so terrific as to shake houses at a distance of eight miles. With a flash, an unearthly hissing sound, and the great monster, the <em>Merrimac</em>, ceased to exist." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Destruction of Merrimac

"Destruction of the Confederate ironclad steamer Merrimac, blown up by its commander, on the…

The Mississippi at Port Hudson, Louisiana.

Mississippi at Port Hudson

The Mississippi at Port Hudson, Louisiana.

The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864, during the American Civil War.

Opening of the Battle of Mobile Bay

The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5, 1864, during the American Civil War.

The Siege of Fort Morgan occurred during the American Civil War as part of the battle for Mobile Bay in 1864.

Capture of Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay

The Siege of Fort Morgan occurred during the American Civil War as part of the battle for Mobile Bay…

"Farragut's naval victory in Mobile Harbor. The <em>Hartford</em> engaging the Confederate ram <em>Tennessee</em>. Official report of the engagement: 'The engagement with the enemy's fleet took place on the west side of Mobile Bay, in the direction of Fort Powell, and out of range of the guns of Fort Morgan. The <em>Tennessee</em> boldly steamed in the direction of our fleet, as if for the purpose of running down and destroying the wooden vessels, without paying attention to the monitors, except to keep out of their way; but they persevered in following her and cutting her off, when her whole attention was forced to be directed to them. The fighting did not last long between them, however, for the flagship and the <em>Monongahela</em> steamed in the direction of the <em>Tennessee</em>, the <em>Monongahela</em> striking her amidships with her terrible prow, causing the huge Confederate monster to reel like a drunken man. The <em>Hartford</em> then grappled the <em>Tennessee</em>, but further bloodshed was saved by the latter hoisting the white flag from the pilot-house. Captain Pierre Giraud led the party who boarded the ram, and the Confederate Admiral Buchanana delivered up his sword to him.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Mobile Harbor

"Farragut's naval victory in Mobile Harbor. The Hartford engaging the Confederate ram Tennessee.…

"The United States gunboat <em>Mohawk</em> chasing the Confederate steamer <em>Spray</em> into the St. Mark's River." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Mohawk

"The United States gunboat Mohawk chasing the Confederate steamer Spray into the St.…

"Loss of the <em>Monitor</em>- gallant attempt of the officers and crew of the United States steamer <em>Rhode Island</em>, to rescue the crew of the <em>Monitor</em>, off Cape Hatteras, at midnight, December 30th 1862. The closing day of 1862 will always be a dark one in our history, for just on the threshold of its birth the pet monster of our ironclads went down off Hatteras, with our flag flying on its tower, and in the midst of a furious storm. Its sudden and unlooked-for fate recalled to every mind that memorable Sunday in March when it signalized its advent to war by driving back to its Norfolk retreat the terrible <em>Merrimac</em>." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Monitor

"Loss of the Monitor- gallant attempt of the officers and crew of the United States steamer…

Navy soldiers on the deck of the Monitor, a warship famous for the battle with the Merrimac.

Monitor

Navy soldiers on the deck of the Monitor, a warship famous for the battle with the Merrimac.

Famous Stalemate between the Monitor and Merrimac.

Moniter and Merrimac

Famous Stalemate between the Monitor and Merrimac.

Battle between the ironclads Monitor and Merrimac.

Monitor and Merrimac

Battle between the ironclads Monitor and Merrimac.

"Siege of Charleston, S. C. Bombardment of Fort Moultrie and Batteries Bee and Beauregard by the monitors and <em>Ironsides</em>, September 7th-9th, 1863. The bombardment of Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island, on the 7th and 8th of September, was of the most determined and virgorous character, the <em>Ironsides</em> devoting herself to the fort, while the monitors paid their respects to Batteries Bee and Bearegard. Our artist gives a striking sketch as viewed from a favorable point. Moultrie House is seen on the extreme right, and next to it Moultrieville on fire, the dark smoke of the burning houses contrasting with the white puffs of smoke from the cannon thundering along the whole line. Behind the <em>Irondsides</em> is Fort Moultrie; the Confederate battery to the extreme left is Battery Bee; and nearly in front of it, the second in the line of monitors, is the stanch <em>Weehawken</em>, aground. A striking feature in this picture is the effect of the ricochet shot knocking up a series of <em>jets d'eau</em>."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Moultrie

"Siege of Charleston, S. C. Bombardment of Fort Moultrie and Batteries Bee and Beauregard by the monitors…

"Destruction of the famous Confederate privateer <em>Nashville</em>, in the Ogeechee River, Ga., by the Federal ironclad <em>Montauk</em>, Captain Worden, February 28th, 1863. Captain Worden's report: 'The enemy's steamer <em>Nashville</em> was observed by me in motion above the battery known as for McAllister. A reconnoissance immediately made proved that in moving up the river she had grounded in that part known as Seven' Miles Reach. Believing that I could, by approaching close to the battery, reach and destroy her, I moved up at daylight this morning, accompanied by the blockading fleet in these waters. By moving up close to the obstructions I was enabled, although under a very heavy fire from the battery, to appraoch the <em>Nashville</em> still aground, within the distance of twelve hundred yards. A few well-directed shells determined the range, and I soon succeeded in striking her with 11-inch and 15-inch shells. The other gunboats maintained a fire from an enfilading position upon the battery and the <em>Nashville</em> at long range. I soon had the satisfaction of observing that the <em>Nashville</em> had caught fire from the shells xploding in her in several places, and in less than twenty minutes she was caught in flames forward, aft and amidships. At 9:20 A. M. a large pivot gun mounted abaft her foremast exploded from the heat; at 9:40 her smoke chimney went by the board, and at 9:55 her magazine exploded with terrific violence, shattering her in smoking ruins. nothing remains of her. The battery kept up a continuous fire upon this vessel, striking her but five times, and doing no damage whatever.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Destruction of Nashville

"Destruction of the famous Confederate privateer Nashville, in the Ogeechee River, Ga., by…

"Naval action between the United States war steamer <em>Mississippi</em> and the Confederate iron-cased floating battery ram and other steamers, off the mouth of the Pass A L'outre, New Orleans, January 1st, 1862."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Naval battle

"Naval action between the United States war steamer Mississippi and the Confederate iron-cased…

Passage of the second division of the Federal Squadron past Fort St. Philip. On April 24, 1862 at three o'clock in the morning, the greater part of Commodore Farragut's squadron passed the forts through one of the most terrible fires ever known. It consisted of five sloops of war and nine gunboats. The mortar flotilla and eight war steamers remained below, thus putting the forts between two fires, and cutting off all communication with New Orleans. General Duncan surrendered the forts unconditionally to Captain Porter, on Monday, April 28. There were found about seven hundred men in each fort.

The Great Naval Battle of the Mississippi

Passage of the second division of the Federal Squadron past Fort St. Philip. On April 24, 1862 at three…

First day's bombardment, Federal Schooners off Forts Jackson and St. Philip, commanding the passage of the river. The Federal offensive force consisted of six sloops of war, sixteen gunboats and twenty-one mortar vessels. These were accompanied by a large number of storeships, tenders, etc. On the 18th of April, they anchored three miles below Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and prepared for active operations. Captain Porter, commanding the mortar flotilla, wishing to ascertain their range before his actual attack, stationed the <em>Arietta, John Griffiths<em> and <em>Orvetta<em> about two and a half miles from the forts. The <em>Arietta<em> fired the first shot, to which Fort Jackson replied. The Confederate shots fell short more than fifty yards every time, while the effect of our shells on the fort was such that after two explosions the enemy retired from their barbette guns, and afterward only used those in the casemates.

The Great Naval Battle on the Mississippi

First day's bombardment, Federal Schooners off Forts Jackson and St. Philip, commanding the passage…

"Naval Practice Battery, navy yard, Washington, D. C. We present to our readers a sketch of what was called the Naval Practice Battery, where our young gunners rehearsed before they got into the terrible ordeal of battle. Simple as the loading and firing of a gun may sound, it is an operation which tries the nerves, and requires the utmost nicety of adjustment. It is really and truly as much an act of science, if properly done, as the most delicate surgical operation."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

naval practice

"Naval Practice Battery, navy yard, Washington, D. C. We present to our readers a sketch of what was…