The 1789-1860 American Republic ClipArt gallery provides 109 images of the time in United States history between the American Revolutionary War and the Civil War, marked by establishment and evolution of the government, and rapid growth and expansion.

Andrew Jackson's reception by the citizens of New Orleans following his defeat of the British in the Battle of New Orleans.

Jackson's Reception by the Citizens of New Orleans

Andrew Jackson's reception by the citizens of New Orleans following his defeat of the British in the…

The tomb of Andrew Jackson, in The Hermitage in Nashville, Tennessee.

Jackson's Tomb

The tomb of Andrew Jackson, in The Hermitage in Nashville, Tennessee.

The grave of Thomas Jefferson in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Thomas Jefferson's Grave

The grave of Thomas Jefferson in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 or 1781 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. He was the only vice-president ever elected by the United States Senate under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment. Johnson also represented Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate and began and ended his political career in the Kentucky House of Representatives.

Richard Mentor Johnson's Monument

Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 or 1781 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President…

A depiction of the commission given to the American spy William Johnston in the War of 1812.

Facsimile from Johnston's commission

A depiction of the commission given to the American spy William Johnston in the War of 1812.

The Second Battle of Lacolle Mills was fought on March 30, 1814 during the War of 1812. The small garrison of a British outpost position, aided by reinforcements, fought off a strong but poorly executed American attack.

La Colle Mill and Blockhouse

The Second Battle of Lacolle Mills was fought on March 30, 1814 during the War of 1812. The small garrison…

The monument dedicated to James Lawrence and Ludlow who fought in the War of 1812.

The Lawrence and Ludlow Monument

The monument dedicated to James Lawrence and Ludlow who fought in the War of 1812.

Lincoln's birthplace in Hardin County, Kentucky.

Lincoln's birthplace

Lincoln's birthplace in Hardin County, Kentucky.

The Battle of Lundy's Lane was a battle of the War of 1812 on July 25, 1814, fought in present-day Niagara Falls, Ontario. It was one of the bloodiest battles ever fought in Canada.

Site of British battery at Lundy's Lane

The Battle of Lundy's Lane was a battle of the War of 1812 on July 25, 1814, fought in present-day Niagara…

Fort Michilimackinac or Fort Mackinaw was an 18th century French, and later British, fort and trading post in the Great Lakes of North America.

Mackinaw from Round Island

Fort Michilimackinac or Fort Mackinaw was an 18th century French, and later British, fort and trading…

The monument of Alexander Macomb in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

Macomb's Monument

The monument of Alexander Macomb in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

The Battle of Maguaga (also known as the Battle of Monguagon or the Battle of the Oakwoods was a small battle between British troops, Canadian militia and Tecumseh's natives and a larger force of American troops during the War of 1812.

Maguaga Battleground

The Battle of Maguaga (also known as the Battle of Monguagon or the Battle of the Oakwoods was a small…

Malden, on the Detroit River, was a place of great importance during the War of 1812. It is where the British ships were built.

View of Malden in 1861, where the British ships were built

Malden, on the Detroit River, was a place of great importance during the War of 1812. It is where the…

Harmar's Defeat was a battle of the Northwest Indian War. The Maumee Ford is the place of Harmar's Defeat.

The Maumee Ford, place of Harmar's Defeat

Harmar's Defeat was a battle of the Northwest Indian War. The Maumee Ford is the place of Harmar's Defeat.

The American army in Mexico City.

American Army in Mexico City

The American army in Mexico City.

Inhabitants of the Mexican coast.

Inhabitants of the Coast, Mexico

Inhabitants of the Mexican coast.

Man by river, being chased by wolves or dogs.

Escape from Native Americans During the Miami War

Man by river, being chased by wolves or dogs.

"In June of 1817 President Monroe took a very extensive journey through the States, visiting all the fortifications ... He was conveyed up the Delaware from Wilminton to the navy-yard in Philadelphia in a barge of the Franklin. The barge was lined and trimmed with crimson velvet, and rowed by sixteen oarsmen, dressed in scarlet vests, white sleeves and trousers." -Abbot, 1902

Monroe's Barge

"In June of 1817 President Monroe took a very extensive journey through the States, visiting all the…

During the War of 1812, there was a Massacre at Frenchtown. Winchester sent troops to Monroe to protect the inhabitants there.

Monroe, Michigan

During the War of 1812, there was a Massacre at Frenchtown. Winchester sent troops to Monroe to protect…

The tomb of the fifth President of the United States, James Monroe. His grave is at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.

Tomb of Monroe

The tomb of the fifth President of the United States, James Monroe. His grave is at Hollywood Cemetery…

American soldiers fighting in Monterey, Mexico.

Capture of Monterey

American soldiers fighting in Monterey, Mexico.

Commodore Charles Morris, USN (1784 – 1856) was a U.S. naval administrator and officer whose service extended through the first half of the 19th century.

Charles Morris's Monument

Commodore Charles Morris, USN (1784 – 1856) was a U.S. naval administrator and officer whose service…

Fight between the <em>Chesapeake</em> and <em>Shannon</em>.

Naval Battle

Fight between the Chesapeake and Shannon.

New London is a seaport city and a port of entry on the northeast coast of the United States. It is located at the mouth of the Thames River in New London County, southeastern Connecticut.

New London in 1813

New London is a seaport city and a port of entry on the northeast coast of the United States. It is…

Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans

Battle of New Orleans

Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans

The Old State House in Hartford, Connecticut where the Hartford Convention met in 1814.

Old State House

The Old State House in Hartford, Connecticut where the Hartford Convention met in 1814.

The monument in honor of Thomas Paine, the author, revolutionary, and intellectual of the American Revolution.

Paine's Monument

The monument in honor of Thomas Paine, the author, revolutionary, and intellectual of the American Revolution.

In honor of the forty percent of South Carolina's palmetto regiment an iron palmetto was erected. This monument which now stands on the state grounds which honors the forty percent of the regiment who died of disease and wounds.

Iron Palmetto

In honor of the forty percent of South Carolina's palmetto regiment an iron palmetto was erected. This…

The Battle of Plattsburgh, also known as the Battle of Lake Champlain, ended the final invasion of the northern states during the War of 1812.

Battle of Plattsburg

The Battle of Plattsburgh, also known as the Battle of Lake Champlain, ended the final invasion of the…

The tomb of President Polk in Nashville, Tennessee.

Polk's Tomb

The tomb of President Polk in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Battle of Rodriguez's Canal was a prelude to the Battle of New Orleans that occurred near New Orleans on January 1st 1815.

Remains of Rodriguez's Canal in 1861

The Battle of Rodriguez's Canal was a prelude to the Battle of New Orleans that occurred near New Orleans…

The Battle of Sackett's Harbor took place on May 29, 1813, during the Anglo-American War of 1812.

Sackett's Harbor in 1812

The Battle of Sackett's Harbor took place on May 29, 1813, during the Anglo-American War of 1812.

The Battle of Big Sandy Creek was fought in northwestern New York on May 29 &ndash; May 30, 1814, during the War of 1812.

Place of Battle at Sandy Creek

The Battle of Big Sandy Creek was fought in northwestern New York on May 29 – May 30, 1814, during…

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Slave Auction in New Orleans

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The monument dedicated to Colonel Melanchton Smith (1780-1818) who fought in the War of 1812.

Melanchton Smith's Monument

The monument dedicated to Colonel Melanchton Smith (1780-1818) who fought in the War of 1812.

During the War of 1812 Sodus Bay was mostly burned during an attack by the British.

Destruction at Sodus Bay

During the War of 1812 Sodus Bay was mostly burned during an attack by the British.

Construction began in 1772 and was not completed until 1779 due to the ongoing Revolutionary War. From November 26, 1783 to June 3, 1784, Annapolis served as the United States capital. The Congress of the Confederation met in the Maryland State House. Subsequently, Annapolis was a candidate to become the new permanent national capital before Washington, D.C. was built.

State House, Annapolis, MD

Construction began in 1772 and was not completed until 1779 due to the ongoing Revolutionary War. From…

"Sutter's Mill, where gold was first found in California." -Gordy, 1916

Sutter's Mill

"Sutter's Mill, where gold was first found in California." -Gordy, 1916

The Battle of the Thames, also known as the Battle of Moraviantown, was a decisive American victory in the War of 1812. It took place on October 5, 1813, near present-day Chatham, Ontario in Upper Canada. It resulted in the death of the Shawnee chief Tecumseh, and the destruction of the Native American coalition that he led. The American victory led to the re-establishment of American control over the Northwest frontier

Appearance of the Thames Battle Ground in 1860

The Battle of the Thames, also known as the Battle of Moraviantown, was a decisive American victory…

The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought in 1811 between United States forces led by Governor William Henry Harrison of the Indiana Territory and forces of Tecumseh's growing American Indian confederation. The battle took place outside Prophetstown, near present-day Battle Ground, Indiana, and was part of what is sometimes known as Tecumseh's War, which continued into the War of 1812. The battle was an important political and symbolic victory for the American forces.

Tippecanoe Battle Ground in 1860

The Battle of Tippecanoe was fought in 1811 between United States forces led by Governor William Henry…

Turkey Foot Rock was the location where Me-sa-sa, an Ottawa Indian chief, died during the Battle of Fallen Timbers.

Turkey Foot Rock

Turkey Foot Rock was the location where Me-sa-sa, an Ottawa Indian chief, died during the Battle of…

The anti-slavery novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe was published in 1852 and had an effect on the view of slavery.

Uncle Tom's Cabin

The anti-slavery novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe was published in 1852 and had an effect on the view…

The Battle of Veracruz was a 20-day siege of the key Mexican seaport of Veracruz, during the Mexican-American War. Lasting from March 9 to March 29, 1847, it began with the first large-scale amphibious assault conducted by United States military forces, and ended with the surrender and occupation of the city. U.S. forces then marched inland to Mexico City.

Vera Cruz during the Mexican War

The Battle of Veracruz was a 20-day siege of the key Mexican seaport of Veracruz, during the Mexican-American…

American troops bombarding the city of Vera Cruz during the Mexican-American war.

Bombardment of Vera Cruz

American troops bombarding the city of Vera Cruz during the Mexican-American war.

Washington's grave, Mount Vernon.

Washington's Grave

Washington's grave, Mount Vernon.

"A western emigrant train. The occupation of the west. With every year the line of settlements was pushed farther westward. Along the great highways, and by trails across the prairies, one might see long emigrant trains. Covered wagons contained the family goods and carried the women and children; the men marched behind or rode on horseback; they drove the sheep and cattle which they were taking to the new homes. These emigrants often formed large parties for better protection against Indians and wild beasts. They camped at night by streams of water when they could. They built their camp fires and kept guard all night, for they could hear the howling of wolves and sometimes see Indians stealing toward them. As they moved on, they would meet men and wagons coming from the opposite direction. Already the great West was sending back produce and droves of cattle and pigs to the Eastern markets."&mdash;Scudder, 1897

Western Train

"A western emigrant train. The occupation of the west. With every year the line of settlements was pushed…

People traveling westward on the overland route to California in covered wagons.

Westward Expansion

People traveling westward on the overland route to California in covered wagons.

The Burning of Washington took place in 1814, during the Anglo-American War of 1812. British forces occupied Washington, D.C. and set fire to many public buildings. The facilities of the U.S. government, including the White House, were largely destroyed.

Remains of the White House After the Fire of 1814

The Burning of Washington took place in 1814, during the Anglo-American War of 1812. British forces…

Eleazer Derby Wood (1783 &ndash; September 17, 1814) was an American Army officer in the War of 1812. He was distinguished at Fort Erie, where he lost his life in a sortie. Colonel Wood was much beloved by General Brown, who caused a handsome marble monument to be erected to his memory at West Point. Also, he was the namesake of Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island in New York Harbor on which the Statue of Liberty was built. He is also the namesake of Wood County, Ohio.

Colonel Eleazer Derby Wood's Monument at West Point

Eleazer Derby Wood (1783 – September 17, 1814) was an American Army officer in the War of 1812.…