The Alamo in San Antonio, Texas where the battle occurred during the war for Texan independence.

Alamo

The Alamo in San Antonio, Texas where the battle occurred during the war for Texan independence.

The Battle of the Alamo was fought in February and March 1836 in San Antonio, Texas. The conflict, a part of the Texas Revolution, was the first step in Mexican President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's attempt to retake the province of Texas after an insurgent army of Texian settlers and adventurers from the United States had driven out all Mexican troops the previous year. Mexican forces began a siege of the Texian forces garrisoned at the Alamo Mission on Tuesday, February 23. For the next twelve days, Mexican cannons advanced slowly to positions nearer the Alamo walls, while Texian soldiers worked to improve their defenses.

The Alamo

The Battle of the Alamo was fought in February and March 1836 in San Antonio, Texas. The conflict, a…

Naval battle between an American ship and an Algerine corsair.

Capture of an Algerine Corsair

Naval battle between an American ship and an Algerine corsair.

Bas-relief of early amusements at the amphitheatre.

Amphitheatrical Amusements

Bas-relief of early amusements at the amphitheatre.

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming the Confederate position, after a desperate conflict of four hours, Wednesday, September 17th, 1862. On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge, after an obstinate contest of four hours' duration and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed, and finding the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, advanced in line of battle on their new position, about half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on the advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hillin front of the enemy's batteries they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. The Federals, though terribly decimated, gave them a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming…

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South), fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and Antietam Creek, as part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South), fought on…

An illustration of the Spanish Armanda. The Spanish Armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England under the command of the Duke of Medina Sidonia in 1588, leading to the Drake-Norris Expedition of 1589, also known as the English Armada.

Spanish Armada

An illustration of the Spanish Armanda. The Spanish Armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against…

A depiction of two soldiers fighting for Assyria, using bow and arrows against their enemies.

Assyrian Soldiers Fighting

A depiction of two soldiers fighting for Assyria, using bow and arrows against their enemies.

Showing the Battle for Atlanta, which Sherman won for the Union during the Civil War.

Battle of Atlanta

Showing the Battle for Atlanta, which Sherman won for the Union during the Civil War.

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant. On the 12th General Grant overtook General Gregg at Raymond, and after a stubborn fight defeated him, Gregg retreating with a loss of 7,000 men. Having been joined by reinforcements under General Walker, Gregg made a stand the next day at Mississippi Springs, but Grant again defeated him. On the 14th, in a still warmer engagement, he utterly defeated Gregg, who lost 400 men and 17 cannon, and fled through Jackson, firing the Capitol and many depots, storehouses and dwellings. On the 16th he met General Pemberton, with the whole garrison of Vicksburg, at Baker's Creek, and defeated him, driving him back toward Vicksburg, with a loss of 29 pieces of artillery and 4,000 men, and cutting him off from all hopes of relief. Pressing rapidly on, Grant, on the 17th, overtook Pemberton at Big Black River Bridge, and again defeated him, with a loss of 2,600 men and 17 guns. Pemberton then retired into the city, which Grant invested."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Baker's Creek

"Battle of Baker's Creek, May 16th, 1862- Defeat of the Confederates under Pemberton, by General Grant.…

A modern battle scene

Battle

A modern battle scene

An illustration of a battle in 1861.

Battle

An illustration of a battle in 1861.

The Battle of Agincourt was an English victory against a larger French army in the Hundred Years' War. The battle occurred on Friday 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), in northern France. Henry V's victory started a new period in the war, in which he came very close to capturing the throne of France for himself and his heirs.

Battle of Azincourt

The Battle of Agincourt was an English victory against a larger French army in the Hundred Years' War.…

"The Battle of Fontenoy. From the painting by Horace Vernet, at Versailles." -Rees, 1894

The Battle of Fontenoy

"The Battle of Fontenoy. From the painting by Horace Vernet, at Versailles." -Rees, 1894

An illustration of men pillaging a city.

Battle Scene

An illustration of men pillaging a city.

"The Battle by the Ships" — Gayley, 1893

Battle Ships

"The Battle by the Ships" — Gayley, 1893

"In the Brave Days of Old." —Bulfinch, 1897

Roman battle

"In the Brave Days of Old." —Bulfinch, 1897

The crew of a naval ship in the Revolutionary War praying before they head in to battle.

Before Battle Prayer

The crew of a naval ship in the Revolutionary War praying before they head in to battle.

"After a successful summer campaign, [Caesar] made his way to the coast and cross over into Britain. He then withdrew into his winter-quarters in Gaul, but in the following year returned into the island, defeated the British Celts under their king Cassivellaunus, and reduced the country to a dependency, compelling the Britons to pay tribute and give hostages."

Landing of the Romans in Britain

"After a successful summer campaign, [Caesar] made his way to the coast and cross over into Britain.…

The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major land battle of the American Civil War, fought on July 21, 1861, near Manassas, Virginia.

Battle of Bull Run

The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major land battle…

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." —Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

"Raising a large army [Kudur-Lagamer] advanced up the Euphrates, and thence westward against the Caanitish tribes, who under their kings gathered in the valley of the eastern invader. Here was fought one of the first greatest battles recorded in history. Kudur-Lagamer was victorious, and the kings of Canaan were for a period of twelve years brought into subjection."—Ridpath, 1885

Kudur-Lagamer Storming a Town in Canaan

"Raising a large army [Kudur-Lagamer] advanced up the Euphrates, and thence westward against the Caanitish…

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862. As soon as the order to advance was given the brigade moved forward, until it came to the open field, in perfect silence. As soon as it was clear from the woods, with a cheer that could have been heard all over the battle ground, it took the double-quick, and though at every step its ranks grew thinner from the murderous fire through which it passed, yet there was no faltering, no hesitancy; onward, across the field, up the slope and into and through the woods it went, until it met the second line of the enemy's overpowering forces. Forced at last to yield to overwhelming odds, it retired over the ground gained at such a frightful cost until it reached the cover from which it started. Here what remained held their position until the third brigade could come to its support. When exhausted, cut to pieces, its officers all gone, with no one to direct it, those who survived gathered as fast as thy could, and in the morning all that was left of that brigade was less than seven hundred men." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar…

The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War, fought near the village of Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, from April 30 to May 6, 1863.

Ruins of Chancellorsville

The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War, fought near the village…

Assyrian war-chariot.

Chariot

Assyrian war-chariot.

Egyptian War-chariot

Chariot

Egyptian War-chariot

"The stalwart character and aggressive bearing of the Assyrians were particularly shown in war. The same ferocity which they manifested in the pursuit and destruction of beasts they also exhibited in hunting men. The sculptures show that the feeling of the Assyrians towards the foe was one, not of hostility only, but of hatred and contempt."—Ridpath, 1885

Assyrian War Chariot

"The stalwart character and aggressive bearing of the Assyrians were particularly shown in war. The…

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler, detaching itself from General Slocum's division and rushing to the support of the General Kearny's division, which had been driven back, thus turning the fortunes of the day, June 30th, 1862, six o'clock p.m." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Charles City

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler,…

Depiction of a Civil War battle.

Civil War Battle

Depiction of a Civil War battle.

In 1189, Colchester was granted its first Royal Charter by King Richard I (Richard the Lionheart.) In 1648, during the Second English Civil War, a Royalist army led by Sir Charles Lucas and Sir George Lisle entered the town. A pursuing Parliamentary army led by Sir Thomas Fairfax and Henry Ireton surrounded the town for eleven and a half weeks, a period known as the Siege of Colchester. The Royalists surrendered in the late summer and their leaders Lucas and Lisle were executed in the grounds of Colchester Castle. A small obelisk marks the spot where they fell.

Fairfax Taking Possession of Cochester

In 1189, Colchester was granted its first Royal Charter by King Richard I (Richard the Lionheart.) In…

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

The Arch of Constantine was erected to celebrate Constantine's victory of Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge. It is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill.

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine was erected to celebrate Constantine's victory of Maxentius at the Battle of…

An illustration of the fortification around Constantinople and soldiers firing cannons.

Constantinople

An illustration of the fortification around Constantinople and soldiers firing cannons.

The Constitution engaging two British ships, the Cyane and Levant.

The Consititution Capturing the Cyane and Levant

The Constitution engaging two British ships, the Cyane and Levant.

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement. We illustrated the opening of this battle on page 159, and now add a sketch of the centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement, described by our correspondent, as follows: "General Melroy had the centre, and pressed steadily forward from the ground where he first took position, planting his guns each time nearer the enemy's batteries. His artillery delivered its fire with a precision truly remarkable. The ground where the enemy's guns were planted was furrowed with our shot and shell as with a plow, and where one battery stood I counted twelve dead horses. General Melroy's infantry deployed through the woods, taking advantage of a deep gully to cross a wheatfield, where they were exposed, and charged gallantly up the hill, where one of the opposing batteries was planted, cutting down the gunners with their fire. Had they been supported they would have captured a battery. They made the crest of the hill too hot to hold on the part of the enemy, and held their position until recalled." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"Battle of Cross Keys, Sunday June 8th, 1862- centre and front of the Federal army in the engagement.…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing to attack the Confederate army under General Jackson, June 8th, 1862. By one of those singular chances which have made the conventional day of rest the day of famous battles, on the morning of Sunday, June 8th, 1862, the advance of General Fremont's army came up with the Confederate forces at cross Keys, about six miles to the south of Harrisonburg." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cross Keys

"The Battle of Cross Keys- opening of the fight- the federal troops, under General Fremont, advancing…

An illustration of a crowd fighting.

Crowd Fighting

An illustration of a crowd fighting.

Battle fought between two brothers, Cyrus the Younger and Arsaces. Cyrus managed to collect eleven thousand Greek soldiers, and went into battle for the Persian throne his elder brother had recently occupied.

Battle of Cunaxa

Battle fought between two brothers, Cyrus the Younger and Arsaces. Cyrus managed to collect eleven thousand…

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

Dacian Stronghold

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A desperate and disastrous action occurred on the banks of the Potomac, at Dam No. 4. General Butterfield's brigade, consisting of the Forty-fourth New York, Seventeenth New York, Eighteenth Massachusetts and One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania, were ordered to make a reconnoissance on the Virginia side. Crossing over at Dam No. 4, which is about six miles northwest in a straight line from Sharpsburg, and eight south from Williamsport, they had hardly landed when a most murderous fire was opened upon them from an entire division of the Confederate army, every volley of which told, as they had the Federals completely under range. The Federals made a desperate resistance, but they were compelled to retire before superior numbers, and retreated in moderate order across the river." —Leslie, 1896

Battle at Dam No. 4

"Battle at Dam No. 4, Potomac River, between Butterfield's brigade and a large Confederate force. A…

"Here [Darius] was assassinated by Bessus, the satrap of Bactria. He was discovered by Alexander in a dying condition by the roadside. He asked for a cup of water, thanked the giver, and died. And with him died the Empire of the Persians."—Ridpath, 1885

Alexander Discovers the Body of Darius

"Here [Darius] was assassinated by Bessus, the satrap of Bactria. He was discovered by Alexander in…

"The Death of Poniatowski. From the painting by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

The Death of Poniatowski

"The Death of Poniatowski. From the painting by Horace Vernet." -Rees, 1894

Destruction of the Confederate cruiser Alabama at Cherbourg, France.

Destruction of the Alabama

Destruction of the Confederate cruiser Alabama at Cherbourg, France.

A boy in battle with a ferocious dragon.

Dragon Slayer

A boy in battle with a ferocious dragon.

The Battle of El Molino del Rey was fought during the Mexican-American War in the city of Chapultepec in 1847.

Battle of El Molino del Rey

The Battle of El Molino del Rey was fought during the Mexican-American War in the city of Chapultepec…

"And Eleazar the son of Saura saw one of the beasts harnessed with the king's harness: and it was higher than the other beasts: and it seemed to him that the king was on it: And he exposed himself to deliver his people and to get himself an everlasting name. And he ran up to it boldly in the midst of the legion, killing on the right hand, and on the left, and they fell by him on this side and that side. And he went between the feet of the elephant, and put himself under it: and slew it, and it fell to the ground upon him, and he died there. Then they seeing the strength of the king and the fierceness of his army, turned away from them." 1 Maccabees 6:43-47 DRA
<p>Eleazar attacks an elephant he assumes to be carrying the king. The elephant falls and kills Eleazar.

Eleazar Attacks the Elephant

"And Eleazar the son of Saura saw one of the beasts harnessed with the king's harness: and it was higher…

Depicts a battle between Egyptians and Ethiopians, with a few slain men on the ground and other men fighting on horses.

Egyptians in Battle with the Ethiopians

Depicts a battle between Egyptians and Ethiopians, with a few slain men on the ground and other men…

"It was during the siege of Methone that Philip had the misfortune to lose on of his eyes. A random arrow discharged from the rampart fell square in the king's face and destroyed one-half of his sight. When the arrow-head was drawn away, it was found to contain the following label: "Astor to Philip's right eye." It appeared on inquiry that the unerring missile had been discharged by an offended archer who has recently offered his services to the king and been rejected. He hd represented to Philip that his skill with the bow was great that he could kill a small bird on the wing. The king not believing the story had put off the applicant with the remark, "Well, well, I shall make use of thee when I go to war with the starlings." Astor has then joined the Methoneans and now vindicated his skill in a way never to be forgotten."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Astor to Philip's Right Eye

"It was during the siege of Methone that Philip had the misfortune to lose on of his eyes. A random…

A cartoon image showing some soldiers on horses running to attack a castle.

The Fight

A cartoon image showing some soldiers on horses running to attack a castle.

As June wore on, Grant pressed the siege with vigor. Johnston tried to help Pemberton, but could not. Grant proceeded to mine under some of the Confederate works to blow them up. One of these, known as Fort Hill Bastion, was in front of McPherson, ad on the afternoon of June 25 it was exploded with terrible effect, making a great breach, at which a fierce struggle ensued.

Blowing Up Fort Hill Bastion

As June wore on, Grant pressed the siege with vigor. Johnston tried to help Pemberton, but could not.…

The attack on Fort Moultrie, South Carolina.

Attack on Fort Moultrie

The attack on Fort Moultrie, South Carolina.

"Interior of Fort Sumter after the bombardment in 1863." -Gordy, 1916

Fort Sumter

"Interior of Fort Sumter after the bombardment in 1863." -Gordy, 1916

Depiction of the battle on the Mississippi between Confederate and Union forces at Forts Jackson and St. Philip.

Passage of Forts Jackson and St. Phillip

Depiction of the battle on the Mississippi between Confederate and Union forces at Forts Jackson and…

A gabion is an open cylinder made of brushwood, canvas, wire-netting, or iron bands used in fortification. Filled with loose earth, gabions are placed on end, in tiers, to form a wall behind which earth can be piled. They are usually constructed on location and made up of whatever materials are on hand.

Gabion

A gabion is an open cylinder made of brushwood, canvas, wire-netting, or iron bands used in fortification.…

Mill, with a man standing and a man on horseback in the foreground.

Scene of the Battle of Gaines' Mill

Mill, with a man standing and a man on horseback in the foreground.