The Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks Station was fought on May 31 and June 1, 1862 in Henrico County, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the Civil War.

Battle of Fair Oaks

The Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks Station was fought on…

"Gettysburg Battlefield"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battlefield

"Gettysburg Battlefield"— Frank Leslie, 1896

"General Bayard, born in Seneca Falls, N. Y., December 18th 1835, died December 14th, 1862, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1856. He was assigned to the First Cavalry. Four years were passed in frontier and garrison duty. He was severely wounded in a fight with the Kiowa Indians. In 1861 he was promoted to first lieutenant in Third Cavalry; captain, Fourth Cavalry, August 20th; and was granted leave of absence to become colonel of the First Pennsylvania Cavalry Volunteers, September 14th, 1861. He became brigadier general of volunteers, April 28th, 1862, and served in the arduous campaigns of the Shenandoah, Northern Virginia, and on the Rappahannock, distinguishing himself by the dash and bravery of his reconnoissances. He was mortally wounded at Fredericksburg, December 13th, 1862, and died the following day. He was buried with military honors at Princeton, N. J." —Leslie, 1896

General George D. Bayard

"General Bayard, born in Seneca Falls, N. Y., December 18th 1835, died December 14th, 1862, was graduated…

"Engagement at Bealington, Va., between Ohio and Indiana regiments and a detachment of Georgia troops. On July 8th, 1861, from a high hill in the neighborhood of Bealington, two large bodies of troops were seen marching out of the Confederate camp. They advanced under cover of the wood, when the Federal skirmishers rushed at them. The confederate cavalry then appeared, and the skirmishers retreated, when the Federal regiments threw a couple of shells into the midst of the cavalry, who at once retired. The Ohio troops then sent another volley and several shells into the wood, which did so much execution among the Confederates that the officers could not rally them."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bealington

"Engagement at Bealington, Va., between Ohio and Indiana regiments and a detachment of Georgia troops.…

"General Beauregard, who opened the Civil War by bombarding Fort Sumter, made a brilliant record during the conflict between the States. He won the battle of Bull Run; distinguished himself at Shiloh; held General Halleck in check for two months; defended Charleston; and commanding at Petersburg, aided General Lee in the long and gallant defense of Richmond."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General P. G. T. Beauregard

"General Beauregard, who opened the Civil War by bombarding Fort Sumter, made a brilliant record during…

Pierre Gustave Toutan Beauregard (1818 - 1893) was a Louisiana-born author, civil servant, politician, inventor, and general for the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was the victor at the First Battle of Bull Run near Manassas, Virginia and commanded armies through the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi.

General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard

Pierre Gustave Toutan Beauregard (1818 - 1893) was a Louisiana-born author, civil servant, politician,…

"General Beaver served in the Civil War."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General James A. Beaver

"General Beaver served in the Civil War."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in the James River, a little above the bridge which connects the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. It is about an acre and a half, and in this small space there were on an average ten thousand Federal soldiers imprisoned and slowly tortured. The Confederate capital has been so often described that we shall confine ourselves to the special view before us. The prominent building is the Capitol; the five churches on the left are St. Paul's, First Baptist, St. James's, Second Baptist and Grace Street Methodist; the large building at the end of the bridge is Haxall's flouring mill, the largest one of the kind in the world, being thirteen stories high."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Belle Isle

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in…

"Battle of Belmont, Mo., opposite Columbus, Ky, November 7th, 1861- Federal forces commanded by U. S. Grant; Confederate forces, by Leonidas Polk. Explanation: 1. Brigadier General Grant and staff directing the movements of the troops. 2. Brigadier General McClernand leading the charge at the head of the Thirty-first Illinois. 3. Thirty-first Illinois, Colonel Logan. 4. Body of Lieutenant Colonel Wendtz, Seventh Ohio. 5. Body of Captain Pulaski, aid-de-camp to McClernand, killed while leading the charge. 6. Caisson ordered to the field from the rear. 7. Twenty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Buford, taking the camp colors of the Confederates. 8. Thirtieth illinois, colonel Fouke. 8A. Twenty-second Illinois, Colonel Dougherty. 9. Light artillery, Captain Taylor. 10. Seventh Ohio, Colonel 11. Captain Schwartz, acting chief of artillery, taking the Confederate battery. 12. Watson's Louisiana field battery. 13. Confederate artillery horses. 14. Battery of heavy ordinance at Columbus. 15. Encampment near Columbus. 16. Confederate ferryboat. 17. Columbus"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Belmont

"Battle of Belmont, Mo., opposite Columbus, Ky, November 7th, 1861- Federal forces commanded by U. S.…

The Battle of Belmont was fought on November 7, 1861 in Mississippi County, Missouri. This battle was the first combat test in the Civil War for General Ulysses S. Grant, the future Union Army general in chief and eventual U.S. president. The sketch shows the Confederate batteries on the bluff and at its base. The steamboats are drawn up against the western shore.

Battle of Belmont

The Battle of Belmont was fought on November 7, 1861 in Mississippi County, Missouri. This battle was…

"General Benham, born in Connecticut in 1817, died in New York June 1st, 1884, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837, and assigned to the Corps of Engineers. Served in the Mexican War, 1847-'8, and was brevetted captain for gallant and meritorious services in the battle of Buena Vista. At the beginning of the Civil War, in 1861, Captain Benham entered upon active service; was on General Morris's staff as engineer of the Department of the Ohio; was brevetted colonel for gallantry at the battle of Carrick's Ford, July 13th, 1861; in August was made brigadier general of volunteers, and was engaged in the Virginia campaigns. In 1862 he was present at the capture of Fort Pulaski and James Island; later in the year he superintended fortifications in Boston and Portsmouth harbors, and was in command of the Northern District of the Department of the South. He proved very efficient in throwing pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock, the Potomac and the James Rivers, and was in command of the Pontoon Department at Washington in 1864. In March, 1865, he was brevetted brigadier general and major general, United States Army, and major general, United States Volunteers, for gallant services during the Rebellion."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General Henry W. Benham

"General Benham, born in Connecticut in 1817, died in New York June 1st, 1884, was graduated from the…

Judah Philip Benjamin (1811 - 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. Benjamin was the first Attorney General of the Confederacy on February 25, 1861. He is often referred to as "the brains of the Confederacy."

Judah Philip Benjamin

Judah Philip Benjamin (1811 - 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. Benjamin was the first Attorney…

"The Battle of Bentonville, N. C.- Major General Mower, commanding First Division, Seventeenth Corps, turning the Confederate left, half a mile from Bentonville, March 20th, 1865. This pretty and thriving little town, in Johnston County, N. C., was the scene of a desperate struggle between a portion of General Sherman's army and the rear of the Confederate army on the 20th of March, 1865. Our artist has given a spirited sketch of a brilliant dash upon the Confederate forces by a division of the Seventeenth Corps, commanded by General Mower, and spoke with great admiration of the dogged valor of a Confederate captain who refused to surrender his gun. A sharp encounter ensued between him and one of the Federal soldiers, in which the unfortunate Confederate got his brains dashed out with the butt-end of a musket. The defeat of the Confederates was very much attributed to the brilliant charge made upon their lines by which their right was flanked. When the Federal troops entered, it was found that the retreating Confederates had fired a large quantity of rosin and turpentine. The flames were, however, subdued, before all was destroyed."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Bentonville

"The Battle of Bentonville, N. C.- Major General Mower, commanding First Division, Seventeenth Corps,…

"General Berry, born in Thomaston (now Rockland), Me., August 27th, 1824, died at Chancellorsville, Va., May 2nd, 1863. He originated and commanded for several years the Rockland Guard, a volunteer company, which attained a very high reputation for drill and discipline. At the beginning of the Civil War he entered the service as colonel of the Fourth Maine Infantry. He took part in the battle of Bull Run and the siege of Yorktown, was made a brigadier general, April 4th, 1862, and was given command of the Third Brigade of the Third Division of Heintzelman's Third Army Corps. He was present at the battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, bore a conspicuous part in the Seven Days' fight, and was in the second Bull Run campaign and Chantilly. In January, 1863, he was nominated by the President as major general of volunteers, with rank dating from November 29th, 1862, confirmed by the Senate on March 9th, 1863, and placed in command of the Second Division of the Third Army Corps, succeeding General Sickles. At the battle of Chancellorsville he headed one of his brigades in several successful bayonet charges, and in one of them was killed by a shot from the enemy." —Leslie, 1896

General Hiram G. Berry

"General Berry, born in Thomaston (now Rockland), Me., August 27th, 1824, died at Chancellorsville,…

Group of soldiers escorting a corpse on a wagon.

Duryea's Zouaves at Big Bethel Brining Off Grebel's Body

Group of soldiers escorting a corpse on a wagon.

"Burning of the American merchantman "Harvey Birch," of New York, Captain Nelson, in the British Channel, by the Confederate Steamer "Nashville," Captain Peagrim, November 17th, 1861. On the 17th of November, 1861, the "Harvey Birch," a splendid New York vessel of 1,480 tons and valued at $150,000, was on her way from Havre to New York in ballast, commanded by Captain Nelson, with officers and crew, all told, twenty-nine men. In latitude 49.6 north, longitude 9.52 west, she was brought to by the Confederate steamer "Nashville," and boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who took the crew of the "Birch" on board the "Nashville," robbed the vessel of everything valuable, and then set fire to it, the commander, Peagrim, watching her destruction from his own deck." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Harvey Birch

"Burning of the American merchantman "Harvey Birch," of New York, Captain Nelson, in the British Channel,…

"View of the fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Bird's Point, MO., opposite Cairo, Ill."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bird's Point

"View of the fortifications erected by the Federal troops at Bird's Point, MO., opposite Cairo, Ill."—…

"Birney's Division Third Corps"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Birney's Division

"Birney's Division Third Corps"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana Zouaves in their bivouac at Cumberland, Maryland. Great interest was attached to this regiment after its brilliant attack at Romney; and as we have presented them in the midst of the action, we have pleasure in showing them to our readers roughing it in their distant camps. The members of this regiment were magnificent specimens of the physical man, and under the Colonel Wallace and his officers, who marched on foot, leading their men, accomplished feats of endurance and daring that had been considered impossible in warfare.

Bivouac of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana…

Black was a general in the 37th Illinois regiment and was wounded in the battles of Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove.

General John C. Black

Black was a general in the 37th Illinois regiment and was wounded in the battles of Pea Ridge and Prairie…

(1810-1883) Judge that struggled to maintain the Union during the Civil War.

Jeremiah Black

(1810-1883) Judge that struggled to maintain the Union during the Civil War.

"Scene in camp near Falmouth, Va. Army blacksmith shoeing a refractory mule."— Frank Leslie, 1896

blacksmith

"Scene in camp near Falmouth, Va. Army blacksmith shoeing a refractory mule."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Francis Preston Blair Jr. (1821 - 1875) was an American politician and Union Army general during the American Civil War. He served as a U.S. Senator and Representative for the state of Missouri and was the Democratic Party's nominee for Vice President in 1868.

Francis Preston Blair Jr.

Francis Preston Blair Jr. (1821 - 1875) was an American politician and Union Army general during the…

"Cavalry skirmishers advancing on the Confederate position in the pass of the Blue Ridge."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Blue Ridge

"Cavalry skirmishers advancing on the Confederate position in the pass of the Blue Ridge."— Frank…

"The victory at Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- infantry charge, and rout of the Confederates. On Sunday, September 14th, 1862, having previously evacuated Frederick City, the rear of the Confederate army had reached the Blue Ridge Pass, on the line of the Federal road leading from Frederick City to Hagerstown and the fords of the Upper Potomac. Here it was overtaken by the Federal advance under Generals Hooker and Reno. The position was a strong one, and strongly guarded, but was carried after a severe action by the Federal forces, the Confederates falling back in disorder. In this engagement General Reno was killed on the Federal side, and General Garland on that of the Confederates." —Leslie, 1896

Blue Ridge Pass

"The victory at Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- infantry charge, and rout of the Confederates.…

"Battle of Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the first Federal victory in Maryland. On Sunday, the 14th day of September, having previously evacuated Frederick City, the rear of the Confederate army had reached the Blue Ridge Pass on the line of the national road leading from Frederick toward Hagerstown and the fords of the upper Potomac. Here it was overtaken by the Federal advance under Generals Hooker and Reno. The position was a strong one and strongly guarded, but was carried, after a severe action, by the Federal forces, the Confederates falling back in disorder. In this engagement General Reno was killed on the Federal side, and General Garland on that of the Confederates. The Federal loss was four hundred and forty-three killed, one thousand eight hundred and six wounded, and seventy-six missing; that of the Confederates, five hundred killed, two thousand three hundred and forty-three wounded, and one thousand five hundred prisoners."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Blue Ridge Pass

"Battle of Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the first Federal victory in Maryland. On…

"Drury's Bluff, a Confederate position on the James River, near Richmond, Va. The principal Confederate defense of Richmond was Fort Darling, a heavy work on a high bank called Drury's Bluff, eight miles below Richmond. Here the river was closed with heavy piling and vessels loaded with stone sunk in the channel. The work was casemated and mounted with heavy guns. It will be remembered that the Federal ironclads, the <em>Galena</em> and the <em>Monitor</em>, were repulsed here during the progress of the Peninsular campaign. The <em>Monitor</em> was unable to elevate her guns sufficiently to reach the works, and the sides of the <em>Galena</em> were not thick enough to resist the plunging shot from the fort, which struck its sides at right angles. The <em>Naugatuck</em>, the only other vessel engaged in the assault, burst her single gun on the second discharge."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Drury's Bluff

"Drury's Bluff, a Confederate position on the James River, near Richmond, Va. The principal Confederate…

"The Federal siege works on Bogue Island, N. C., erected for the reduction of Fort Macon. Our sketch represents the covering of the working parties while constructing Captain Morris's Parrot-gun siege batteries on Bogue Island. Our correspondent said: 'Colonel White sometimes beguiles his leisure moments by throwing shells promiscuously about the sand spit upon which our works are located, doubtless to ascertain the exact position of the batteries and to annoy the working parties. The proceedings on such occasions are of the serio-comic order. At the word 'drop,' given by the sentinel in the 'rat hole' at the top of the sand hill upon seeing the flash from the gun at the fort, every man makes a bee-line at the double quick for the nearest cover, assuming a position as near the horizontal as possible. This gives comparative immunity from danger, and up to this time nobody has been hurt, except by falling pieces of shells which have exploded overhead.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bogue Island

"The Federal siege works on Bogue Island, N. C., erected for the reduction of Fort Macon. Our sketch…

Lawyer and congressman who served during the Civil War for the Union.

General E. S. Bragg

Lawyer and congressman who served during the Civil War for the Union.

"General Brannan, born in the District of Columbia in 1819, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1841, and stationed at Plattsburg, N. Y., in 1841-'42. During the Mexican War he was first lieutenant in the First Artillery. He took part in the battles of Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, La Hoya, Contreras and Churubusco, and for gallant and meritorious conduct was brevetted captain on August 28th, 1847. During the next fourteen years he performed much arduous service on the frontier, and from 1856 till 1858 took a gallant part in the campaign against the Seminoles. On September 28th, 1861, he was promoted to be brigadier general of volunteers, serving in the far South until January 24th, 1863. On October 10th, 1863, he became chief of artillery of the Department of the Cumberland, and held that position till June 25th, 1865. On March 13th, 1865, he was brevetted brigadier general in the regular army for his part in the capture of Atlanta, and major general for gallant and meritorious services during the war." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

General John M. Brannan

"General Brannan, born in the District of Columbia in 1819, was graduated from the United States Military…

General John C. Breckinridge (1821 - 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative and Senator from Kentucky, the 14th Vice President of the United States, Southern Democratic candidate for President in 1860, a Confederate general in the Civil War and the last Confederate Secretary of War.

John C. Breckinridge

General John C. Breckinridge (1821 - 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative and Senator from Kentucky,…

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road to Yorktown." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Howard's Bridge and Mill

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road…

American opponent of slavery.

John Brown

American opponent of slavery.

(1791-1868) James Buchanan, fifteenth president of the United States, largely remembered for his failure to avert the Civil War. President, Ambassador to the UK, Secretary of State, Senator from Pennsylvania

James Buchanan

(1791-1868) James Buchanan, fifteenth president of the United States, largely remembered for his failure…

(1823-1914) Simon Bolivar Buckner, Confederate Soldier

Simon B. Buckner

(1823-1914) Simon Bolivar Buckner, Confederate Soldier

(1823-1914) U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

Simon B. Buckner

(1823-1914) U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil…

Confederate general during the Civil War.

Simon Bolivar Buckner

Confederate general during the Civil War.

"Recruiting in Philadelphia, Pa., for the Bucktail Pennsylvania Regiment, August, 1862. This famous regiment suffered so much that recruiting became necessary. As it was a Pennsylvania pet regiment, Philadelphia was all alive with the resounding music of the horns, calling upon all who had killed a buck in fair combat to accept an invitation to their supper of glory. Our artist has, however, told more with a few dashes of his pencil than we can in a column. The Bucktails were a splendid set of fellows, and deserved the reputation they achieved. The fight at Dranesville, the Valley of the Shenandoah and the battle of Cross Keys have been consecrated by their valor. It will be remembered that when Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham of the First New Jersey Cavalry fell into an ambuscade the gallant Bucktails volunteered to his rescue, and were terribly cut up."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bucktail Recruit

"Recruiting in Philadelphia, Pa., for the Bucktail Pennsylvania Regiment, August, 1862. This famous…

(1818-1898) General that helped organize Union troops in the Civil War.

General Buell

(1818-1898) General that helped organize Union troops in the Civil War.

"General Buford, born in Kentucky in 1825, died in Washington, D. C., December 16th, 1863, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1848; was appointed brevet second lieutenant in the First Dragoons, and served on the plains until the Civil War began. He was made a major in the inspector general's corps on November 12th, 1861. On June 6th, 1862, he was attached to the staff of General Pope in the Army of Virginia; and on July 27th he was made a brigadier general, and assigned to the command of a brigade of cavalry under General Hooker in the Northern Virginia campaign. He engaged in the skirmish at Madison Courthouse; the passage of the Rapidan in pursuit of Jackson's force; Kelly's Ford, Thoroughfare Gap, and Manassas, where he was wounded. He commanded the cavalry division of the Army of the Potomac in the Pennsylvania campaign, and at Gettysburg he began the attack on the enemy before the arrival of Reynolds, on July 1st, 1863. His last sickness was the result of toil and exposure. His commission as major general reached him on the day of his death."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General John Buford

"General Buford, born in Kentucky in 1825, died in Washington, D. C., December 16th, 1863, was graduated…

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

The First Battle of Bull Run is also known as the First Battle of Manassas and was the first major land battle of the Civil War fought on July 21, 1861 near Manassas, Virginia. Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell advanced his Union Army troops across Bull Run against the Confederate Army under Brig. Gens. Joseph E. Johnston and P.G.T. Buearegard. The Union was forced to retreat back to Washington, D.C.

First Battle of Bull Run

The First Battle of Bull Run is also known as the First Battle of Manassas and was the first major land…

"Second battle of Bull Run, fought Saturday, August 30th, 1862, between the Federal forces commanded by Major General Pope, and the Confederate forces by Generals Lee, Jackson and Longstreet. The battle began about twelve o'clock noon, and was waged with unwavering success for the Federal forces until about four o'clock in the afternoon. The fighting on both sides was desperate and destructive, either party frequently firing shrapnel and grape from the artillery. At about four o'clock the whole of General Pope's troops, save those under General Banks, were engaged at close quarters with the Confederate forces. The conflict was a desperate one. The firing on both sides was terrific, and the whole line of General Pope's command, from generals commanding army corps down to enlisted men, behaved with wonderful coolness, courage and determination, and fought with the most heroic valor from the beginning to the end. The tide of battle turned adversely for the Federals about half-past five o'clock, overwhelming numbers of re-enforcements being precipitated against the left wing under General McDowell, who was compelled to fall back."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Second Battle of Bull Run

"Second battle of Bull Run, fought Saturday, August 30th, 1862, between the Federal forces commanded…

"Sherman's 'Bummers' foraging in South Carolina. Our artist sent us with this sketch of 'Bummers Foraging' a graphic account of their <em>modus operandi</em>. He wrote: 'These active and unscrupulous fellows generally started out every morning mounted on very mean horseflesh, and, as a general rule, they always came back very well mounted, with the animals they rode in the morning laden, even to breaking down, with all the good things of this world. In one place in South Carolina they came to a large plantation owned by a leading Confederate named Fitzgerald. Here the Federal soldiers found, buried in various out-of-the-way places, an immense quantity of gold and silver plate, of the aggregate value of over $70,000; here they also found a large quantity of the finest Madeira wine, which had been stowed away in the old gentleman's wine cellar for nearly thirty years. Indeed, as a general thing, it may be said that the brave fellows had plenty of good wine to drink on their memorable march through Georgia and South Carolina.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bummers

"Sherman's 'Bummers' foraging in South Carolina. Our artist sent us with this sketch of 'Bummers Foraging'…

"Soldiers participating in a burlesque dress parade. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burlesque Dress Parade

"Soldiers participating in a burlesque dress parade. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga.,…

Alfred Burnard's house stood two miles below Fredericksburg, near the river. The Englishman's estate was known as Mansfield, which General Franklin used as his headquarters.

Burnard's House

Alfred Burnard's house stood two miles below Fredericksburg, near the river. The Englishman's estate…

"Burnside Expedition- the fleet and transports off Hatteras during the storm- the general giving orders. Never had any expedition in the history of the world to pass through a severer ordeal; everything seemed to conspire against it- nature with her storms, and human nature with her villainy. In addition to the warring elements there was the subtle treachery of Northern traitors who deliberately periled the lives of thousands for the sake of gain. Compared to such men as the New York contractors whom the gallant Burnside anathematized in the bitterness of his heart even Judas Isacriot becomes human. Our correspondent wrote that one of the most exciting scenes during this trying crisis was when, off Hatteras, General Burnside sprang up the rigging of the vessel to give his directions." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burnside Expedition

"Burnside Expedition- the fleet and transports off Hatteras during the storm- the general giving orders.…

"The Burnside Expedition- melancholy deaths of Colonel J. W. Allen, Surgeon Waller and the Second Mate of the <em>Ann E. Thompson</em>, on January 15th, 1862, near Hatteras Inlet." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Burnside Expedition

"The Burnside Expedition- melancholy deaths of Colonel J. W. Allen, Surgeon Waller and the Second Mate…

Burnside's Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. During the Battle of Antietam of the Civil War, the bridge played a key role in September of 1862 when a small number of Confederate soldiers from Georgia for several hours held off repeated attempts by elements of the Union Army to take the bridge by force. The Federals seized it but not before the attack was delayed for several hours beyond what Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside had expected. The bridge now bears Burnside's name.

Burnside's Bridge

Burnside's Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. During…

"The war in Virginia. Burnside's corps charging the Confederate position on the right of the enemy's line in front of Petersburg. The first line of Confederate works on the right shown in our sketch were carried by Burnside's Corps. The artillery in the foreground is pouring its steady shower of shot and shell on the enemy's line from the breastworks, while the troops are charging through the brush and fallen trees in double line of battle. The fight was in an open, rolling space of ground, skirted by a belt of timber toward the city. Said an officer: 'It was now about five o'clock P.M. We opened our battery at once and commenced shelling the Confederate fort. We kept on firing for about half an hour, when our infantry, Griffin's brigade, made a charge and captured the fort, taking five guns and about two hundred prisoners. We had, we found, dismounted the Confederate gun by our shells.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burnside's Corps

"The war in Virginia. Burnside's corps charging the Confederate position on the right of the enemy's…

Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824 - 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. Burnside was a Union Army general in the Civil War and conducted campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee but was defeated in the Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater. The term "sideburns" is derived from his last name and his distinctive style of facial hair.

General Ambrose Everett Burnside

Ambrose Everett Burnside (1824 - 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist,…

"Traveling in state"- General Burnside on the road from New Berne to Beaufort, N. C.

General Burnside

"Traveling in state"- General Burnside on the road from New Berne to Beaufort, N. C.

"Major General Burnside assuming command of the Army of the Potomac- issuing orders to his staff. 'Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, November 10th, 1862. In accordance with General Orders, No. 182, issued by the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. Patriotism, and the exercise of my every energy in the direction of this army, aided by the full and hearty co-operation of its officers and men, will I hope, under the blessing of God, insure its success. Having been a sharer of the privations, and a witness of the bravery of the old Army of the Potomac in the Maryland campaign, and fully identified with them in their feelings of respect and esteem for General McClellan, entertained through a long and most friendly association with him, I feel that it is not as a stranger I assume command. To the Ninth Army Corps, so long and intimately associated with me, I need say nothing; our histories are identical. With diffidence for myself, but with a proud confidence in the unswerving loyalty and determination of the gallant army now intrusted to my care, I accept its control, with the steadfast assurance that the just cause must prevail. A. E. Burnside, Major General Commanding.' Our illustration represents the general issuing orders to his staff immediately after assuming command." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Burnside

"Major General Burnside assuming command of the Army of the Potomac- issuing orders to his staff. 'Headquarters,…

"Major General Burnside assuming command of the Army of the Potomac- issuing orders to his staff. 'Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, November 10th, 1862. In accordance with General Orders, No. 182, issued by the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. Patriotism, and the exercise of my every energy in the direction of this army, aided by the full and hearty co-operation of its officers and men, will I hope, under the blessing of God, insure its success. Having been a sharer of the privations, and a witness of the bravery of the old Army of the Potomac in the Maryland campaign, and fully identified with them in their feelings of respect and esteem for General McClellan, entertained through a long and most friendly association with him, I feel that it is not as a stranger I assume command. To the Ninth Army Corps, so long and intimately associated with me, I need say nothing; our histories are identical. With diffidence for myself, but with a proud confidence in the unswerving loyalty and determination of the gallant army now intrusted to my care, I accept its control, with the steadfast assurance that the just cause must prevail. A. E. Burnside, Major General Commanding.' Our illustration represents the general issuing orders to his staff immediately after assuming command." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Burnside

"Major General Burnside assuming command of the Army of the Potomac- issuing orders to his staff. 'Headquarters,…

"General Burnside served in the Civil War."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

General Ambrose E. Burnside

"General Burnside served in the Civil War."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Butchering and dressing cattle for distribution to the Federal Army. The romance and reality of life were never so strikingly displayed as in the Civil War. Fact and fiction never seemed more apart than the soldier waving his sword when leading the forlorn hope and when sitting before his tent cooking rations; for, despite all the commissariat arrangements, there was much room for improvement in these particulars. We give a couple of sketches which will enable our readers to see how matter-of-fact and mechanically base were some of the soldier's employments when in camp. Men who would shrink from turning butcher in New York, boston or Philadelphia were forced by the resistless tide of circumstances to lend a hand to the killing a beeve and afterward to the dressing and cooking it."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Butchering Cattle

"Butchering and dressing cattle for distribution to the Federal Army. The romance and reality of life…