"Burnside Expedition- the fleet and transports off Hatteras during the storm- the general giving orders. Never had any expedition in the history of the world to pass through a severer ordeal; everything seemed to conspire against it- nature with her storms, and human nature with her villainy. In addition to the warring elements there was the subtle treachery of Northern traitors who deliberately periled the lives of thousands for the sake of gain. Compared to such men as the New York contractors whom the gallant Burnside anathematized in the bitterness of his heart even Judas Isacriot becomes human. Our correspondent wrote that one of the most exciting scenes during this trying crisis was when, off Hatteras, General Burnside sprang up the rigging of the vessel to give his directions." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burnside Expedition

"Burnside Expedition- the fleet and transports off Hatteras during the storm- the general giving orders.…

A seal representing the country of Canada.

Canada

A seal representing the country of Canada.

An illustration of one of the cannons salvaged from the wreck of the USS Oneida.

Cannon

An illustration of one of the cannons salvaged from the wreck of the USS Oneida.

"The capstan, in universal use, on board of ships, is an axle placed upright, with a head, or drum, A, pierced with holes for the levers B, C, D. The weight is drawn by the rope E, passing two or three times round the axle to prevent its slipping. This is a very powerful and convenient machine. When not in use, the levers are taken out of their places and laid aside, and when great force is required two or three men can push at each lever." —Comstock, 1850

Capstan

"The capstan, in universal use, on board of ships, is an axle placed upright, with a head, or drum,…

Captain of a ship

Captain

Captain of a ship

A captain on his ship. "At high noon every day he makes an observation, telling by the sun just where we are." -Carpenter, 1912

Captain of a Ship

A captain on his ship. "At high noon every day he makes an observation, telling by the sun just where…

An illustration of a captain standing on a cannon with his foot on the railing of the ship.

Captain Standing on Cannon with Foot on Railing of Ship

An illustration of a captain standing on a cannon with his foot on the railing of the ship.

An illustration of a captain of a ship looking at a man sitting on the deck.

Captain with Crossed Arms Looking at Man Sitting

An illustration of a captain of a ship looking at a man sitting on the deck.

The seal of Carolina above two ships.

Carolina

The seal of Carolina above two ships.

A longitudual cross-section showing the interior of the Caronia.

Longitudinal section of the Caronia

A longitudual cross-section showing the interior of the Caronia.

A plank of considerable thickness bolted edgewise to a vessels's side, nearly abreast of a mast, and serving to extend the shrouds of the lower rigging and keeping them clear of the gunwale.

Channel

A plank of considerable thickness bolted edgewise to a vessels's side, nearly abreast of a mast, and…

The first steamship to be used successfully in a commercial business.

The Clermont

The first steamship to be used successfully in a commercial business.

A type of boat made from many pieces of boards or plates which overlap one another.

Clincher

A type of boat made from many pieces of boards or plates which overlap one another.

A Baltimore clipper.

Clipper

A Baltimore clipper.

The colonial flags from 1775.

Colonial Flags

The colonial flags from 1775.

The colonial seal of Georgia, with a ship underneath.

Colonial Georgia

The colonial seal of Georgia, with a ship underneath.

Departure of Christopher Columbus from Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain

Departure of Columbus from Spain

Departure of Christopher Columbus from Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Commodore Perry at the Battle of Lake Erie

Compass card, part of ship's compass.

Compass Card

Compass card, part of ship's compass.

Diagram of a ship's compass.

Compass, Ship's

Diagram of a ship's compass.

The Annual Excursion of the Congo Fishing Club.Chorus of members :— "Hey, there, in the stern! Trim the boat!"

Congo Fishing Club Annual Excursion 1

The Annual Excursion of the Congo Fishing Club. Chorus of members :— "Hey, there, in the stern!…

The Annual Excursion of the Congo Fishing Club.The thick-skinned member :— "Beg pardon, were you speaking to me?"

Congo Fishing Club Annual Excursion 2

The Annual Excursion of the Congo Fishing Club. The thick-skinned member :— "Beg pardon, were…

The Constitution engaging two British ships, the Cyane and Levant.

The Consititution Capturing the Cyane and Levant

The Constitution engaging two British ships, the Cyane and Levant.

The USS Constitution in 1876.

The Constitution in 1876

The USS Constitution in 1876.

The Seal of the Council of New England.

Council of New England

The Seal of the Council of New England.

A crest and seal below two ships.

Crest and Sea

A crest and seal below two ships.

Two ships at sea with a crest and lions between them.

Crest and Ships

Two ships at sea with a crest and lions between them.

A vessel rigged nearly like a sloop, with one mast and a straight running bowspirit, which may be run in upon deck.

Cutter

A vessel rigged nearly like a sloop, with one mast and a straight running bowspirit, which may be run…

When used in a nautical sense, a cutter is a small single-masted vessel, fore-and-aft rigged, with two or more headsails, a bowsprit, and a mast set further back than in a sloop.

Cutter

When used in a nautical sense, a cutter is a small single-masted vessel, fore-and-aft rigged, with two…

An illustration of a deck hand falling down and spilling a pot.

Deck Hand Falling Down

An illustration of a deck hand falling down and spilling a pot.

An arab vessel, generally with one mast. Mainly used for trading goods and sometimes transporting slaves.

Dhow

An arab vessel, generally with one mast. Mainly used for trading goods and sometimes transporting slaves.

"Longitudinal section of hopper dredger, employed on the River Clyde. The vessel steams to place of working and is moored by the Steam Winches A A at bow and stern to buoys, the Bucket Ladder B is then lowered by steam power, and thereafter Buckets set in motion by gearing C C. The depth of water at which the Bucket Ladder dredges is regulated by the Hoisting Shears and Chain Barrel D D, driven by shafting E E from the Engines. The Buckets discharge the material by the shoot F into the Hopper G. The dredged material is discharged by the doors of the Hopper being opened by the Lifting Chains H H. These doors are hinged on to the side of Vessel, and suspended at centre by the Lifting Chains, which are connected to geared Crab Winches I I." -Hill, 1921

Hopper Dredger

"Longitudinal section of hopper dredger, employed on the River Clyde. The vessel steams to place of…

Dry docks are two kinds, the stationary dock and the floating dock. They are used in order to get at that part of the ships which is under water, in order to mend them.

Dry Dock

Dry docks are two kinds, the stationary dock and the floating dock. They are used in order to get at…

"When one is at sea, or standing on the sea-shore, the first part of a ship seen at a distance, is its mast. As the bessel advances, te mast rises higher and higher above the horizon, and finally the hull, and whole ship, become visible. Now, were the Earth's surface an exact plane, no such appearance would take place, for we should then see the hull long before the mast or rigging, because it is much the largest object." -Comstock 1850

Spheroidal Form of the Earth

"When one is at sea, or standing on the sea-shore, the first part of a ship seen at a distance, is its…

An illustration of an Egyptian royal boat from a sculptured tomb.

Egyptian Royal Boat

An illustration of an Egyptian royal boat from a sculptured tomb.

"The following cut, taken from a very curious intaglio, represents Aeneas embarking with Anchisces and Ascanius. Anchises bears a small shapel, in which are the Penatea." — Anthon, 1891

Embarking

"The following cut, taken from a very curious intaglio, represents Aeneas embarking with Anchisces and…

The inner workings of the Carmania. A description of how the ship gets power in order to move on the ocean.

Turbine Engine

The inner workings of the Carmania. A description of how the ship gets power in order to move on the…

English ship of the sixteenth century.

English Ship

English ship of the sixteenth century.

A drawing of the locks, used for raising and lowering boats, on the Erie Canal.

Locks on the Erie Canal

A drawing of the locks, used for raising and lowering boats, on the Erie Canal.

"Naut.: A strip of board with holes in it for running rigging to pass through and be kept clear, so as to be easily distinguished at night." -Whitney, 1911

Fair-Leader

"Naut.: A strip of board with holes in it for running rigging to pass through and be kept clear, so…

The felucca is a sailing vessel used to protect the Red Sea and the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea.

Felucca

The felucca is a sailing vessel used to protect the Red Sea and the eastern part of the Mediterranean…

A poster of facts and illustrations of the age of feudalism and chivalry.

Feudalism and Chivalry

A poster of facts and illustrations of the age of feudalism and chivalry.

"An ornamental figure, as a statue or bust, on the projecting part of the head of a ship, over the cutwater and immediately under the bowsprit." -Whitney, 1911

Figurehead of Ship

"An ornamental figure, as a statue or bust, on the projecting part of the head of a ship, over the cutwater…

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, and the Federal wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>- sinking of the <em>Cumberland</em> by a blow from the <em>Merrimac</em>, March 8th, 1862- sketched by our special artist. About noon on the 8th, a suspicious-looking vessel, looking like a submerged house, with the roof only above water, was discovered, moving down from Norfolk, by the channel in front of Sewall's Point batteries. There was nothing protruding above the water but a flagstaff flying the Confederate flag and a short smokestack. She moved along slowly, and turned into the channel leading to Newport News, and steamed direct for the wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which were lying at the mouth of James River. As soon as she came within range of the <em>Cumberland</em>, the latter opened on her with her heavy guns; but the balls struck and glanced off without effect. In the meantime, as the <em>Merrimac</em> was approaching the two frigates on one side, the Confederate ironclad steamers <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> came down James River, and engaged the frigates on the other side. The batteries at Newport News also opened on the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em>, and did all in their power to assist the <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which, being sailing vessels, were at the mercy of the approaching steamers. The <em>Merrimac</em>, in the meantime, kept steadily on her course, and slowly approached the <em>Cumberland</em>, when she and the <em>Congress</em>, at a distance of one hundred yards, rained full broadsides on the ironclad monters without effect. After receiving the first broadside of the two frigates, she ran on to the <em>Cumberland</em>, striking her about midship, and literally laying open her bow, left her to sink, while she engaged the <em>Congress</em>, which lay about a quarter of a mile distant. The <em>Congress</em>, having no regular crew on board of her, and seeing the hopelessness of resisting the ironclad steamer, at once struck her colors." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First naval battle

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers Merrimac, Yorktown,…

Fishermen on a boat with a small boy. A sailboat can be seen in the background as well.

Fishermen

Fishermen on a boat with a small boy. A sailboat can be seen in the background as well.

A seaside community with small boats on the shore and a large ship out to sea.

Fishing Community

A seaside community with small boats on the shore and a large ship out to sea.

A floating battery at Charleston, SC.

Floating Battery at Charleston

A floating battery at Charleston, SC.

A floating dock is a platform or ramp supported by pontoons. These are usually joined to the shore with a ramp that rests upon the dock on rollers, to adjust for the vertical movement of the dock. The dock is usually held in place by vertical poles embedded in the soil under the water or by anchored cables. Frequently used in marinas for small boats, this type of dock maintains a fixed vertical relationship to watercraft secured to it, independent of tidal, river, or lake elevation. It is less suited for larger craft as the docks cannot support large structures or cranes. In some regions of the world, a floating dock is called a pontoon.

Floating-dock

A floating dock is a platform or ramp supported by pontoons. These are usually joined to the shore with…

"1. A horn used on board a vessel to sound a warning signal to other vessels in foggy weather. 2. A sounding instrument for warning vessels off shore during a fog. The most powerful of these instruments is the siren, or siren fog-horn." -Whitney, 1911

Brown's Siren Foghorn

"1. A horn used on board a vessel to sound a warning signal to other vessels in foggy weather. 2. A…

The Seals of France, Spain, and England.

France, Spain and England

The Seals of France, Spain, and England.

Benjamin Franklin on a ship on his way to France.

Franklin on His Way to France

Benjamin Franklin on a ship on his way to France.

The original six frigates of the United States Navy were authorized by the Congress with the Naval Act of 1794. Seen here is one of those frigates in 1812.

United States Frigate of 1812

The original six frigates of the United States Navy were authorized by the Congress with the Naval Act…

Fulton's Clermont. Speed: five miles per hour

Fulton's Clermont

Fulton's Clermont. Speed: five miles per hour

Fulton destroyed a vessel of two hundred tons burden by using the torpedo, and he convinced the spectators that any ship might be so demolished.

Fulton's Torpedo

Fulton destroyed a vessel of two hundred tons burden by using the torpedo, and he convinced the spectators…

"Iron rods leading from the futtock-plates to an iron band round the topmast or lower mast." -Whitney, 1911

Futtock Shrouds

"Iron rods leading from the futtock-plates to an iron band round the topmast or lower mast." -Whitney,…

"Gaff. B, boom; CC, cheeks; G, gaff; M, mast; P, peak; T, throat or jaw. Nautical, a spar used to extend the upper edge of fore-and-aft sails which are not set on stays, as the mainsail of a sloop or spanker of a ship." -Whitney, 1911

Gaff Rig

"Gaff. B, boom; CC, cheeks; G, gaff; M, mast; P, peak; T, throat or jaw. Nautical, a spar used to extend…

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans, Genoese, Pisans, and Venetians.

The Venetian galley was generally three-masted, and was usually around 160 feet long, 32 feet broad, and supplied with sixty-four oars, to each of which were chained six or seven slaves. Such galleys were equipped with powerful rams used for boarding and sinking enemy ships. Criminals in France and elsewhere were frequently condemned to serve at the oars in these craft. In modern speech, the term "galley" refers the common kitchen of a ship.

Galley (ship)

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans,…

"Nautical, on men-of-war, a pair of strong frames of oak made in the form of a gallows, fixed between the fore and main hatchways, with concave cross-beams called gallows-tops tenoned on to the uprights, to support spare topmasts, yards, booms, boats, etc." -Whitney, 1911

Gallows-Bitts

"Nautical, on men-of-war, a pair of strong frames of oak made in the form of a gallows, fixed between…

"Shelling of the batteries at Galveston by the United States war steamer <em>South Carolina</em>, on Monday afternoon, August 5th, 1861." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Galveston

"Shelling of the batteries at Galveston by the United States war steamer South Carolina, on…

"Garland lashed on a lower mast. A large rope strap or grommet lashed to a spar when hoisting it on board." -Whitney, 1911

Nautical Garland

"Garland lashed on a lower mast. A large rope strap or grommet lashed to a spar when hoisting it on…