The 1861-1865 Civil War Land Battles ClipArt gallery offers 262 illustrations of land battles that were fought between the Union and the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"The army of the Potomac- Battle of Hatcher's Creek, Va., October 27th, 1864- the Second Corps, under Major General Hancock, flanking the Confederate works at Armstrong's Mill."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Hatcher's Creek

"The army of the Potomac- Battle of Hatcher's Creek, Va., October 27th, 1864- the Second Corps, under…

"The war in Tennessee. Hooker's Battle above the clouds, and capture of the Confederate position on Lookout Mountain, November 24th, 1863. The wild mountains of Tennessee, where nature reveals in producing the most fantastic forms, and piling rocks upon rocks, forms one of the mightiest ridges on the land, have been the scene of one of the most extraordinary battles in history; a battle fought with the mists and clouds rolling beneath the combatants, the flash and the roar of the guns appearing to the spectators in the plain below like the lightning and the thunder of heaven. By eight o'clock on Tuesday, November 24th, Hooker's column was moving up Lookout Valley, and, to the surprise of the enemy, disappeared in the woods south of Wauhatchie. But here, filing his troop to the left, General Hooker began the difficult task of the ascent of the mountain. The head of the column, having reached the palisades, went into line of battle facing to the north, and with the right resting against the palisades stretched down the mountain. Geary's division formed the front, with Greene's brigade of New York troops on the right. General Hooker then formed a second line of the two brigades of the Fourth Corps which had been sent him, placing Whittaker on the right and Grose on the left. General Osterhaus formed a third line, and held himself in readiness to aid any part of the line which might need it. Thus arranged, the corps was ordered forward, with a heavy line of skirmishers thrown out, and marching along the slope of the ridge, soon came upon the rear of the enemy, who were taken completely by surprise. Before those at the foot of the hill could comprehend the situation Colonel Ireland's skirmishers had penetrated far toward the point of the mountain, and got in a heavy fire upon the enemy, who were now trying to escape up the hill, while the Federals assaulted them from above. At the same time the Federal batteries on the Moccasin Point and those of the Confederates on Lookout Mountain opened a heavy fire upon each other, and soon the whole mountain was hid from the view in Chattanooga by the cloud of smoke which rose above and around it. The enemy made but little organized resistance, yet their skirmishers for a long time kept up a heavy fire from behind jutting rocks and from trees. Holding Ireland's right well against the palisades, Geary threw Kennedy forward on the left, and he, after being re-enforced by Grose, the enemy on the point of the mountain gradually gave way and fell back in some disorder to the line of breastworks on the east slope of the mountain, at Craven's House. General Geary swung around until his line was parallel with that of the enemy, and again advanced, but being met by organized and well-directed resistance, for a time recoiled. The enemy were now in strong position, Craven's House being the centre of a line of heavy breastworks; but they lacked numbers to man them, having lost severely. They were compelled to expose their right flank. Hooker then sent the Eighty-fourth and Seventy-fifth Illinois to hold the road across the mountain, and advanced on the enemy, with Geary on the right, Osterhaus on the left. Whittaker and Grose in the centre. Geary turned their left, as Osterhaus did the enemy's right, and then, with one charge of the whole line, Hooker carried the position."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Hooker's Battle

"The war in Tennessee. Hooker's Battle above the clouds, and capture of the Confederate position on…

"Assault of the Second Louisiana [African American] Regiment on the Confederate works at Fort Hudson, May 27th, 1863. The Battle of Fort Hudson was a severe and well-fought action. The Federal troops displayed their usual bravery, and were well handled by General Banks, driving the enemy to his second line of works. Of the [African American] regiments General Banks, in his official report, says: 'They answered every expectation. Their conduct was heroic. No troops could be more determined or more daring. They made during the day three charges upon the batteries of the enemy, suffering very heavy losses, and holding their position at nightfall with the other troops on the right of our line. The highest commendation is bestowed upon them by all officers in command on the right. Whatever doubt may have existed heretofore as to the efficiency of organizations of this character, the history of this day proves conclusively to those who were in a condition to observe the conduct of these regiments that the Government will find in this class of troops effective supporters and defenders. The severe test to which they were subjected, and the determined manner with which they encountered the enemy leave upon my mind no doubt of their ultimate success. They require only good officers, commands of limited numbers, and careful discipline to make them excellent soldiers.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hudson

"Assault of the Second Louisiana [African American] Regiment on the Confederate works at Fort Hudson,…

Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson's men rush into the Federal camp at Chancellorsville

Jackson's men rush into the Federal camp

Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson's men rush into the Federal camp at Chancellorsville

"Repulse of the Confederates at James Island, near Charleston, S. C., June 10th, 1862, in the attempt to capture the pickets of General Wright's division. Our correspondent wrote: "General Benham conceived the design of making a dash across James Island and taking Fort Johnson by surprise. After due deliberation General Hunter agreed to his plan, and troops were transported from Port Royal and taken up Stono River, which was occupied by our gunboats. Two camps were formed on the shore of James Island, about two miles apart, one commanded by General Stevens, and the other by General Wright. Between these camps and Charleston a large force of Confederates, said to be eight thousand men, under command of Colonel Lamar, was stationed to check the advance of the Federals. The advance of this force held possession of a powerful earthwork, about two miles from the Federal camp. The first collision between the hostile forces took place on the 4th of June, in which the Confederates captured about twenty of our men. Later in the day we drove them from their position, and captured a battery of four guns. Things remained quiet until the 10th, when a reconnoissance in force was made for the purpose of advancing our picket lines and taking an earthern fort the Confederates had erected at a place called Secessionville, whose guns threw their shells into our camps, and even into the river where the gunboats were lying, while they were beyond our range. On the afternoon of the 10th the Confederates attacked General Wright's pickets, and were repulsed with heavy loss, our loss being very slight."" —Leslie, 1896

James Island

"Repulse of the Confederates at James Island, near Charleston, S. C., June 10th, 1862, in the attempt…

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal troops and the Morgan Confederate Guerrillas. Cynthiana, the scene of the fight between the Cincinnati volunteers and Morgan's Confederate cavalry, is the capital of Harrison County, Ky. When Morgan with his guerrilas arrived on the south side of the Licking River, on Thursday, July 17th, 1862, he found Lieutenant Colonel Landrum, of the Eighteenth Kentucky Regiment, with a hastily gathered force, ready to oppose him. The splendidly mounted Confederates were, however, too much for him, and after making a gallant defense the Confederates forced their way over the bridge, killed a number of the Federals and captured one cannon. Landrum and about forty of his troops made good their retreat to Lexington, which was in a perfect panic at the proximity of the Confederate chief." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal…

"The raid in Kentucky- the Confederate Morgan with his guerillas bivouacking in Courthouse Square, Paris, Bourbon County, after levying contributions on the inhabitants. The Confederate Morgan reached Paris and Cynthiana, both of which places he occupied, levying large contributions on its unfortunate inhabitants. Our artist reported that it was a most animated and interesting sight to see the blank dismay of the 'Parisians' when Morgan and his men dismounted and bivouacked in their fine square. Beyond some robberies there were no outrages committed. The Courthouse is a very imposing building, and, standing on the highest spot in the town, is visible for miles around."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid

"The raid in Kentucky- the Confederate Morgan with his guerillas bivouacking in Courthouse Square, Paris,…

"Battle near Kinston, N. C., March 8th, 1865."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kinston

"Battle near Kinston, N. C., March 8th, 1865."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Captain Knapp's Battery engaging the Confederates at the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862- this battery fired the first and last shot. Captain Knapp's battery deserved great credit; it's firing was admirable; and although the first to fire a shot, it was also the last. Several times did this skillful soldier and his well-trained men check the advance of the enemy, and finally compelled him to retire. The skill with which Captain Knapp chose his position was very consipicuous, and was much commended by General banks." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Captain Knapp

"Captain Knapp's Battery engaging the Confederates at the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862-…

Little Round Top is the smaller of two rocky hills south of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was the site of an unsuccessful assault by Confederate troops against the Union left flank on July 2, 1863, the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Battleground of Little Round Top

Little Round Top is the smaller of two rocky hills south of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was the site…

Battle of Lookout Mountain

Lookout Mountain

Battle of Lookout Mountain

Confederate and Union forces clash at Lookout Mountain.

Battle of Lookout Mountain

Confederate and Union forces clash at Lookout Mountain.

"The Battle of Lookout Mountain, also known as the Battle Above the Clouds."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Battle of Lookout Mountain

"The Battle of Lookout Mountain, also known as the Battle Above the Clouds."—E. Benjamin Andrews…

"The war in Georgia. Capture of Lost Mountain by General Hooker, June 16th, 1864. On June 14th General Hooker pushed forward, with Geary in the advance, and soon came up with the enemy. Having driven the Confederates from two hills, Geary, being without support upon his right, was forced to halt. Butterfield and Williams having arrived and formed in open fields on the right of Geary's position, about three o'clock P. M., General Hooker ordered an advance of the corps. The lines moved forward, driving the enemy's pickets rapidly before them, halting now and then a moment to dislodge some of the more stubborn of the Confederates, who maintained their fire until almost under the feet of the advancing troops. General Geary's division was the first to encounter the enemy in strong force, with whom one or two sharp volleys were exchanged, and they then fell back to their strongly intrenched lines, from which they opened a terrible fire. This was the commencement of a fierce struggle, which lasted until after dark. Under the cover of darkness the enemy threw out a strong line of skirmishers. The morning of the 15th opened with heavy firing, resulting in repelling an attack of the Confederates to break the picket lines of Geary's Second and Third Brigades. Artillery was placed along the lines, and took a prominent part in the struggle, which continued with varying intensity till after nightfall. Early on the morning of the 16th the skirmishers of Geary's First Brigade discovered that the enemy had evacuated, and they immediately pushed into the works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Capture of Lost Mountain

"The war in Georgia. Capture of Lost Mountain by General Hooker, June 16th, 1864. On June 14th General…

"The war in Louisiana. General Banks's army, in the advance on Shreveport, crossing Cane River, March 31st, 1864. Our sketch represents the Army of the gulf, under General Franklin, crossing Cane River by bridge and pontoons, on March 31st, 1864. The point sketched is about fifty-four miles above Alexandria. The battle at Cramps' Hill which followed is thus described by our correspondent: 'On the 2nd of April our cavalry advancing on Shreveport came upon the Confederates in force at Cramp's Hill, twenty-two miles from Nachitoches, where the roads to Manny and Pleasant Hill branch off. Major Bassford, being in the advance of Lucas's brigade, skirmished with the Confederates, who made a stand eight times, but could not hold their ground. The first line of our skirmishers was dismounted and the second mounted. After their repulse here the Confederates retired up the Manny road, pursued by Major Bassford. They made a stand and opened with artillery, but Rawles's battery silenced their guns and routed De Bray's Texas cavalry in confusion."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana. General Banks's army, in the advance on Shreveport, crossing Cane River, March…

"The war in Louisiana. The army of General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou, October 10th, 1863. Our artist presents a view of the Federal army under General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou on October 10th, 1863. He reached it on the 9th, and finding the bridge destroyed, shelled the shores, and meeting no response, ordered his engineers to lay the pontoon bridges, on which the forces crossed, as shown in our engraving."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana. The army of General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou, October 10th, 1863. Our artist…

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Mansfield, between General Banks and General Dick Taylor, April 8th, 1864."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Mansfield, between General Banks and General Dick Taylor, April 8th,…

Scene from a Civil War Battle,.

Battle of Malvern Hill

Scene from a Civil War Battle,.

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle of Malvern Hill commenced with the advance of a large body of Confederates, extending quite across the country, with cavalry on each flank. The Federals at once jumped up wearily, and waited their appraoch, while all the signal officers, on their several stations, waved their cabalistic muslin. The Federal column was formed with General Couch, of General Keyes's corps, on the extreme left; Franklin and Heintzelman took up the centre, and on the right were the remnants of Porter and Sumner. Burns's brigade, being ordered to charge, advanced with the sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Regiment (Irish), Colonel Owen, and being gallantly seconded by Dana's, Meagher's and French's brigades, they dashed within fifty yards of the enemy and opened a splendid fire of musketry. The left of the line was now advanced, and the troops of General Couch really behaved wonderfully, facing the enemy wherever he appeared, and pouring volleys into him all the time. After fighting two hours, with a loss of about 400, the night fell, and having moved across Turkey Island Creek, they broke up the bridge, and soon the whole army closed up at and near Harrison's Bar, twenty-seven miles from Richmond." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Malvern Hill

"Battle of Malvern Hill, near Turkey Bend, James River, Va., fought Tuesday, July 1st, 1862. The battle…

The Battle of Malvern Hill, also known as the Battle of Poindexter's Farm took place on July 1, 1862, in Henrico County, Virginia was the sixth and last of the Seven Days Battles of the Civil War.

Battle of Malvern Hill

The Battle of Malvern Hill, also known as the Battle of Poindexter's Farm took place on July 1, 1862,…

"The invasion of Maryland- General Kilpatrick repulsing the Confederate Stuart at Boonsborough, July 8th, 1863. The Civil War showed many affairs quite confusing old ideas. We had colonels commanding fleets and marines serving ashore, mounted infantry and dismounted cavalry. On the 8th of July, 1863, General Kilpatrick, who was endeavoring to cut off the Confederate trains from Gettysburg, was attacked by Stuart, and both these fine cavalry officers fought with their men dismounted, Kilpatrick repulsing his antagonist and subsequently capturing a large number of prisoners and wagons."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Invasion of Maryland

"The invasion of Maryland- General Kilpatrick repulsing the Confederate Stuart at Boonsborough, July…

Martin's Massachusetts Battery C opening fire on the Confederate fortifications commanding the approaches to Yorktown, April 5th, 1862.

Massachusetts Battery

Martin's Massachusetts Battery C opening fire on the Confederate fortifications commanding the approaches…

George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general during the American Civil War. He organized the famous Army of the Potomac and served briefly (November 1861 to March 1862) as the general-in-chief of the Union Army.

George McClellan at Battle of Antietam

George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general during the…

George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general during the American Civil War. He organized the famous Army of the Potomac and served briefly (November 1861 to March 1862) as the general-in-chief of the Union Army.

George McClellan

George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general during the…

The Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, also known as the Battle of Mechanicsville or Ellerson's Mill took place on June 26, 1862 in Hanover County, Virginia. The Battle of Mechanicsville was the first major engagement of the Seven Days Battles of the Civil War.

Battle of Mechanicsville

The Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, also known as the Battle of Mechanicsville or Ellerson's Mill took place…

"Battle of Middletown, on the afternoon of the 19th of October, 1864. Great victory won by Major General Sheridan. Our sketch represents the gallant charge of the Sixth Corps, commanded by General Getty, which was made at about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th. It was this which decided the battle. The charge was made in face of a deadly and terrible fire from the Confederate batteries, under which the Federal troops only slightly wavered, though they never for an instant gave way. The battle ground is depicted in our sketch, lying at the foot of the Blue Ridge. The Confederate position is on the right, sheltered by a stone fence. That of the Sixth Corps is similarly protected on the left."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Middletown

"Battle of Middletown, on the afternoon of the 19th of October, 1864. Great victory won by Major General…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000 strong, under General Zollicoffer, and the Federal troops, 4,000 strong, commanded by General Thomas, fought Sunday, January 19th, 1862- flight of the Confederate Army. One of the most dashing, desperate and decisive battles of the war took place on Sunday, January 19th, 1862, when a Confederate army of 8,000 men, led by Generals Zollicoffer and Crittenden, were totally routed by General Thomas, at the head of about 4,000 Federal troops. The cannonading began at four o'clock in the morning, and the engagement soon became general. Zollicoffer found, however, that instead of surprising General Thomas, that able and vigilant officer was ready for him. The Confederates fought gallantly throughout that dismal Sabbath day, and owing to their decided superiority in numbers the result was doubtful till near the conclusion of the conflict. The death of Colonel Peyton, who fell gallantly at the head of his regiment, had materially damped the spirits of the Confederates, but the fall of their commander, Zollicoffer, about ten minutes past three in the afternoon, completed their rout. At that hour, as the Fourth Kentucky regiment was deploying on the flank of the Confederate army, Zollicoffer, attended by several of his aids, mistook his way in the underwood, and suddenly emerged before Colonel Fry, who was also with several officers. At first they mistook each other for friends, but upon the mistake being discovered one of the Confederate officers fired at Fry and shot his horse. Almost at the same instant Colonel Fry drew his revolver and shot General Zollicoffer through the heart. His aids, seeing their commander slain, deserted the body, which was taken charge of by the Federal troops, and carried to Somerset. The news spread like wildfire through the Confederate army, which fled with precipitation, and at half-past three not a confederate stood his ground." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Mill Spring

"Battle of Mill Spring, on the Cumberland River, near Jamestown, between a confederate force, 8,000…

The Battle of Missionary Ridge included in the Third Battle of Chattanooga was fought November 23–25, 1863, in the American Civil War.

Battle of Missionary Ridge

The Battle of Missionary Ridge included in the Third Battle of Chattanooga was fought November 23–25,…

"The war in Mississippi. General McPherson's army crossing the Big Black at messenger's Ferry, Thursday, October 15th, 1863. When the Confederates began to concentrate all their available forces before Rosecrans at Chattanooga a diversion was made by General McPherson, who led an expedition into Mississippi as far as Canton, and compelled them to sacrifice much or change their plans. The alarm caused was beneficial. General McPherson, whom the Confederates learned to respect at Vicksburg, moved rapidly and struck severely. Our sketch represents the army crossing by bridge and ford the Big Black, at a place called Messenger's Ferry, on Thursday, October 15th."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Mississippi

"The war in Mississippi. General McPherson's army crossing the Big Black at messenger's Ferry, Thursday,…

"The war in Mississippi- defeat of Wirt Adams's Confederate cavalry by the Second Wisconsin cavalry, Major Eastman, near Red Bone Church, Miss."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Mississippi

"The war in Mississippi- defeat of Wirt Adams's Confederate cavalry by the Second Wisconsin cavalry,…

"The siege of Mobile- explosion of Fort Powell, at Grant's Pass, July 5th, 1864."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Mobile

"The siege of Mobile- explosion of Fort Powell, at Grant's Pass, July 5th, 1864."— Frank Leslie,…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Skirmishing between the pickets of the two armies near Munson's Hill- the hill in the distance. Munson's Hill is about five miles from the Chain Bridge, on the northern side of the Leesburg Turnpike, about one mile from Bailey's Crossroads, where our pickets were stationed, and about three miles this side of Falls Church, which was in full possession of the enemy. In this neighborhood they had strong pickets, which frequently came into collision with those sent out upon the Federal side from Ball's Roads." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Munson's Hill

"Skirmishing between the pickets of the two armies near Munson's Hill- the hill in the distance. Munson's…

The Battle of Stones River or Second Battle of Murfreesboro (in the South, simply the Battle of Murfreesboro), was fought from December 31, 1862, to January 2, 1863 as the culmination of the Stones River Campaign in the Western Theater of the American Civil War.

Battle of Murfreesboro

The Battle of Stones River or Second Battle of Murfreesboro (in the South, simply the Battle of Murfreesboro),…

Battle at Nashville between Union and Confederate forces.

Siege of Nashville

Battle at Nashville between Union and Confederate forces.

Landing at the Battle of New Bern, also known as the Battle of New Berne or Battle of Newbern which was fought on March 14, 1862 near the city of New Bern, North Carolina. This battle was part of the Burnside Expedition of the Civil War.

Battle of New Bern

Landing at the Battle of New Bern, also known as the Battle of New Berne or Battle of Newbern which…

"Battle of New Berne- Lieutenant Hammond capturing Colonel Avery, of South Carolina, while he was endeavoring to rally the flying Confederates. Our illustration represents the moment when Lieutenant Hammond, of the gunboat <em>Hetzel</em>, who served one of the guns of McCook's naval battery at the battle of New Berne, hearing that a Confederate colonel was, flag in hand, endeavoring to rally a South Carolina regiment, resolved to capture him. Riding up to the Confederate, the gallant Hammond, pointing his pistol at his head, demanded his surrender. A glance at the flying Confederates convinced the colonel that the day was lost, and he gave up his sword to the lieutenant. Two flags were also taken- one made of blue and white silk, elegantly fringed, with this inscription, 'Then conquer we must, for our cause is just,' with 'Victory or death.' The name of the Confederate officer taken was Colonel Avery; three hundred of his regiment were also captured at the same time."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of New Berne

"Battle of New Berne- Lieutenant Hammond capturing Colonel Avery, of South Carolina, while he was endeavoring…

"The battle of Newberne- final and successful charge of the Federal troops under General Burnside, on the Confederate fortifications, their capture, and utter rout of the Confederate army, March 14th, 1862. Great courage, steadiness and military capacity was shown by the men who fought under Burnside in the attack on Newberne. Landing under the greatest disadvantages, in fog and rain, which deprived them of anticipated naval assistance, and after a night of greatest exposure and a weary march they were called on to encounter a superior force, strongly posted in an advantageous position, behind works equally extensive and formidable. They, nevertheless, although but imperfectly supported by artillery, carried every Confederate position, swept the enemy before them with the bayonet, captured every fortification, defended by an aggregate of the sixty-four guns, and swooped down irresistibly on the city of Newberne, the object of their assault."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of New Berne

"The battle of Newberne- final and successful charge of the Federal troops under General Burnside, on…

The Battle of New Bern was fought on 14 March 1862, near the city of New Bern, North Carolina, as part of the Burnside Expedition of the American Civil War.

Troops Landing at Newbern

The Battle of New Bern was fought on 14 March 1862, near the city of New Bern, North Carolina, as part…

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry and Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, June 13th, 1862- death of the Confederate Captain Latane. The Confederate cavalry raid was first to Old Church, where they had a skirmish with a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry, who gallantly cut their way through the greatly superior numbers of the enemy, killing a Confederate captain. The Confederates then proceeded to Garlick's Landing, on the Pamunkey River, and only four miles from the White House; thence to Baltimore Crossroads, near New Kent Courthouse, on their way to Richmond, which they reached by crossing the Chickahominy, between Bottom's Bridge and James River."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Old Church

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United…

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry and Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, June 13th, 1862- death of the Confederate Captain Latane. The Confederate cavalry raid was first to Old Church, where they had a skirmish with a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry, who gallantly cut their way through the greatly superior numbers of the enemy, killing a Confederate captain. The Confederates then proceeded to Garlick's Landing, on the Pamunkey River, and only four miles from the White House; thence to Baltimore Crossroads, near New Kent Courthouse, on their way to Richmond, which they reached by crossing the Chickahominy, between Bottom's Bridge and James River."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Old Church

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United…

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry and Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, June 13th, 1862- death of the Confederate Captain Latane. The Confederate cavalry raid was first to Old Church, where they had a skirmish with a squadron of the Fifth United States Cavalry, who gallantly cut their way through the greatly superior numbers of the enemy, killing a Confederate captain. The Confederates then proceeded to Garlick's Landing, on the Pamunkey River, and only four miles from the White House; thence to Baltimore Crossroads, near New Kent Courthouse, on their way to Richmond, which they reached by crossing the Chickahominy, between Bottom's Bridge and James River."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Old Church

"Desperate skirmish at Old Church, near Tunstall's Station, VA., between a squadron of the Fifth United…

"General Asboth and staff at the Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., March 6th-8th, 1862. The gallantry displayed by General Asboth in the victory of Pea Ridge gives great interest to the spirited sketch of himself and staff which we present to our readers. Among the officers in the sketch were Acting Brigadier General Albert, Brigade Quartermaster McKay, the young commander of the Fremont Hussars, Major George E. Waring, Jr., from New York city, formerly major of the Garibaldi Guards, and the general's aids-de-camp, Gillen and Kroll, etc. Among General Asboth's most constant attendants was his favorite dog, York, a splendid speciment of the St. Bernard species." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"General Asboth and staff at the Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., March 6th-8th, 1862. The gallantry displayed…

The Battle of Pea Ridge, also known as Elkhorn Tavern, was fought on March 7th and 8th in 1862 during the Civil War. This was one of the battles in which a Confederate army outnumbered a Union army.

Battle of Pea Ridge

The Battle of Pea Ridge, also known as Elkhorn Tavern, was fought on March 7th and 8th in 1862 during…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: "On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: 'On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber.'" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000 strong, under Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth, and the combined Confederate army of the Southwest, 25,000 strong, under Generals Van Dorn, Price and McCulloch- total defeat of the Confederates. The official report of this battle by General Curtis is as follows: 'On Thursday, March 6th, the enemy commenced an attack on my right wing, assailling and following the rear guard of a detachment under General Sigel to my main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but ceased firing when he met my re-enforcements about 4 P.M. Early on the 7th I ordered an immediate advance of the cavalry and light artillery, under Colonel Osterhaus, with orders to attack and break what I supposed would be the re-enforced line of the enemy. This movement was in progress when the enemy commenced an attack on my right. The fight continued mainly at these points during the day, the enemy having gained the point held by the command of Colonel Carr at Cross Timber Hollow, but was entirely repulsed, with the fall of the commander, McCulloch. At sunrise on the 8th my right and centre renewed the firing, which was immediately answered by the enemy with renewed energy. I immediately ordered the centre and right wing forward, the right turning the left of the enemy and cross firing on his centre. This final position of the enemy was in the arc of a circle. A charge of infantry extending throughout the whole line completely routed the entire Confederate force, which retired in great confusion, but rather safely through the deep, impassable defiles of cross timber.'" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Pea Ridge

"Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark., fought March 6th, 7th and 8th, 1862, between the Federal forces, 13,000…

The Battle of Perryville, also known as the Battle of Chaplin Hills, was fought on October 8, 1862, in the Chaplin Hills west of Perryville, Kentucky as the culmination of the Confederate Heartland Offensive during the Civil War.

Battle of Perryville

The Battle of Perryville, also known as the Battle of Chaplin Hills, was fought on October 8, 1862,…