This ClipArt gallery offers 244 illustrations of ancient Roman architecture. Roman architecture adopted many styles from the Greek, and is most noted for their expert implementation and frequent use of the arch and dome.

An abacus is denoted primarily a square tablet of any description, and was hence employed in the following significations: 1. A table, or side-board, chiefly used for the display of gold and silver cups, and other kinds of caluable and ornamental utensils. The use of abaci was first introduced at Rome from Asia Minor after the victories of Cn. Manlius Vulso, B.C. 187, and their introduction was regarded as one of the marks of the growing luxury of the age; 2. A draught-board or chess-board; 3. A board used by mathematicians for drawing diagrams, and by arithmeticians for the purposes of calculation; 4. In architecture, the flat square stone which constituted the highest member of a column, being placed immediately under te architrave.

Abacus

An abacus is denoted primarily a square tablet of any description, and was hence employed in the following…

"A genus of small herbaceous plants of southern Europe and Africa; they have spinosely toothed leaves, and they are sometimes cultivated for the sake of their beautiful foliage."-Whitney, 1902

Acanthus

"A genus of small herbaceous plants of southern Europe and Africa; they have spinosely toothed leaves,…

The Roman acanthus constitutes a type, rather than a particular form of leaf. As compared with the Greek type, it is less massive, less pointed, more minutely modeled. It suggests a larger, thinner, more flexible and more complex leaf, with well-developed "eyes" at the bases of the lobes and "pipes" or ribs curving from these to the base of the leaf.

Acanthus Leaves

The Roman acanthus constitutes a type, rather than a particular form of leaf. As compared with the Greek…

Four types of acanthus leaves.

Acanthus Leaves

Four types of acanthus leaves.

"Roman amphitheater at Pola, Dalmatia." -Breasted, 1914

Amphitheater

"Roman amphitheater at Pola, Dalmatia." -Breasted, 1914

The Roman amphitheater in Arles built in the Middle Ages.

Amphitheater

The Roman amphitheater in Arles built in the Middle Ages.

"Amphitheatre at Rome." — Goodrich, 1844

Roman amphitheatre

"Amphitheatre at Rome." — Goodrich, 1844

"The remains of Ampitheater of Arles, France. "-Whitney, 1902

Ampitheater

"The remains of Ampitheater of Arles, France. "-Whitney, 1902

"The remains of Ampitheater of Nimes, France. "-Whitney, 1902

Ampitheater

"The remains of Ampitheater of Nimes, France. "-Whitney, 1902

"Antefixa representing Minerva superintending the construction of the Ship Argo. Antefixa are terra-cottas, which exhibited various ornamental designs, and were used in architecture to cover the frieze of the entablature. These terra-cottas do not appear to have been used among the Greeks, but were probabl Etruscan in their origin, and were thence taken for the decoration of Roman buildings. The name antefixa is evidently derived from the circumstance that they were fixed before the buildings which they adorned. Cato, the censor, complained that the Romans of his time began to despise ornaments of this description, and to prefer the marble friezes of Athens and Corinth. The rising taste which Cato deplored may account for the superior beauty of the antefixa preserved in the British Museum, which were discovered at Rome." — Smith, 1873

Antefixa

"Antefixa representing Minerva superintending the construction of the Ship Argo. Antefixa are terra-cottas,…

"The two imperfect antefixa, are amoung those found at Velletri, and described by Carloni. Antefixa are terra-cottas, which exhibited various ornamental designs, and were used in architecture to cover the frieze of the entablature. These terra-cottas do not appear to have been used among the Greeks, but were probabl Etruscan in their origin, and were thence taken for the decoration of Roman buildings. The name antefixa is evidently derived from the circumstance that they were fixed before the buildings which they adorned. Cato, the censor, complained that the Romans of his time began to despise ornaments of this description, and to prefer the marble friezes of Athens and Corinth. The rising taste which Cato deplored may account for the superior beauty of the antefixa preserved in the British Museum, which were discovered at Rome." — Smith, 1873

Antefixa

"The two imperfect antefixa, are amoung those found at Velletri, and described by Carloni. Antefixa…

"A street of tombs outside Rome, on the Appian Way." -Breasted, 1914

Appian Way Tombs

"A street of tombs outside Rome, on the Appian Way." -Breasted, 1914

A famous road with many branches which connected Rome with Southern Italy

Construction of a Portion of Appian Way

A famous road with many branches which connected Rome with Southern Italy

"Roman aqueduct near Nimes, in France."—Colby, 1899

Aqueduct

"Roman aqueduct near Nimes, in France."—Colby, 1899

"A conduit for conveying water more particularly applied to structures for conveying water from distant sources for the supply of large cities." — Williams, 1889

Aqueduct

"A conduit for conveying water more particularly applied to structures for conveying water from distant…

A Roman aqudect.

Roman aqueduct

A Roman aqudect.

"Part of a Roman Aqueduct. Aqueducts form one of the most characteristic features of Roman architecture. Although these simple successions of gigantic arches, which stretch for miles, have no pretensions to artistic beauty, yet their wonderful size and extent bear witness to the vast conceptions of Roman genius."

Roman Aqueduct

"Part of a Roman Aqueduct. Aqueducts form one of the most characteristic features of Roman architecture.…

"The ruined aqueducts in the Campagna." — Young, 1901

Ruined aqueducts

"The ruined aqueducts in the Campagna." — Young, 1901

"Ambo in the Ara Coeli." — Young, 1901

Ambo in the Ara Coeli

"Ambo in the Ara Coeli." — Young, 1901

An arcade is a passage or walkway covered over by a succession of arches or vaults supported by columns. An engaged column is a column embedded in a wall and partly projecting from the surface of the wall, sometimes defined as semi or three-quarter detached. In Roman architecture they exist in profusion, most commonly embedded in the cella walls of pseudoperipteral buildings. Engaged columns are distinct from pilasters, which by definition are ornamental and not structural.

Roman Arcade with Engaged Columns

An arcade is a passage or walkway covered over by a succession of arches or vaults supported by columns.…

The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill.

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill.

"Triumphal arches from a class apart among the monuments of Roman architecture. It was an early custom for victorious generals to make a triumphal entry into the city, during which were displayed the spoils of war in the shape of arms, temple vessels, jewels and more. Larger triumphal arches had a smaller passage on each side, besides the main entrance."

Arch of Constantine

"Triumphal arches from a class apart among the monuments of Roman architecture. It was an early custom…

Arch of Titus (Rome)

Arch of Titus

Arch of Titus (Rome)

"Arches of S. Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

Arches

"Arches of S. Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

The amphitheater of Arles is a roman amphitheater in the southern French town of Arles. It is still in use today.

The Amphitheater of Arles

The amphitheater of Arles is a roman amphitheater in the southern French town of Arles. It is still…

"Roman Ovolo Molding, with Pearl Beading. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman architecture, and consequently became more massive and more copious itself."

Roman Astragal

"Roman Ovolo Molding, with Pearl Beading. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character…

"Ornamented Roman Astragal. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman architecture, and consequently became more massive and more copious itself."

Roman Astragal

"Ornamented Roman Astragal. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman…

"The town clock of Athens in the Hellenistic Age." -Breasted, 1914

Athenian Town Clock

"The town clock of Athens in the Hellenistic Age." -Breasted, 1914

The so-called Attic base is the form which most frequently occurs; and consists of two tori separated by a cavetto, the whole having a plinth as basis; the upper torus being less high and projecting than the lower.

Attic Base in the Temple of Minerva Polias

The so-called Attic base is the form which most frequently occurs; and consists of two tori separated…

Simple water leaf molding.

Band Molding

Simple water leaf molding.

Enriched water leaf molding.

Band Molding

Enriched water leaf molding.

Acannthus leaf enriched molding.

Band Molding

Acannthus leaf enriched molding.

"The Roman people reclined at their meals. On each couch there were commonly three persons. They lay with the upper part of the body reclined on the left arm, the head a little raised, the back supported by cushions and the limbs stretched out at full length, or a little bent; the feet of the first behind the back of the second, and his feet behind the back of the third, with a pillow between each. When they ate, they raised themselves on their elbow, and made use of the right hand. A banqueting-room generally contained three couches, holding nine guests, and, from the number of couches, was called <em>riclinium</em>. The following representation of such a room is from one at Pomopeii. In the centre is a pedestal to receive the table." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Banqueting room

"The Roman people reclined at their meals. On each couch there were commonly three persons. They lay…

"Section of the Basilica of Constantine or Maxentius (Temple of Peace)." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Basilica

"Section of the Basilica of Constantine or Maxentius (Temple of Peace)." — Encyclopedia Britanica,…

"Sectional view of the old Basilica of St. Peter, before its destruction in the 15th century." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Basilica

"Sectional view of the old Basilica of St. Peter, before its destruction in the 15th century." —…

"Interior view of trajan's Basilica (Basilica Ulpia), as restored by Canina." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Basilica

"Interior view of trajan's Basilica (Basilica Ulpia), as restored by Canina." — The Encyclopedia…

"Section of the Basilica of Maxentius or Constantine (Temple of Peace)." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Basilica

"Section of the Basilica of Maxentius or Constantine (Temple of Peace)." — The Encyclopedia Britannica,…

"Sectional view of the old Basilica of St. Peter, before its destruction in the 16th century." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Basilica

"Sectional view of the old Basilica of St. Peter, before its destruction in the 16th century." —…

"Section of Basilica of S. Agnese at Rome." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Basilica

"Section of Basilica of S. Agnese at Rome." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"A building which served as a court of law and an exchange, or place of meeting for merchants and men of business. The word was adopted from the Athenians, whose second archon was styled, and the tribunal where he adjudicated the substantive aula or porticus in Latin being omitted for convenience, and the distinctive epithet coverted into a substantive. The first edifice of this description at Rome was not erected until B.C. 182, it was situated in the forum adjoining the curia, and was denominated Bascilica Aemilia, from a medal of Lepidus." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Basilica

"A building which served as a court of law and an exchange, or place of meeting for merchants and men…

"Section of the Basilica of Maxentius or Constantine (Temple of Peace)." &mdash; Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

Basilica of Constantine

"Section of the Basilica of Maxentius or Constantine (Temple of Peace)." — Encyclopediia Britannica,…

This illustration shows the transverse section of the Basilica of Maxentius.

Basilica of Maxentius

This illustration shows the transverse section of the Basilica of Maxentius.

"The Basilica of Maxentius has great intersecting vaults, vaulted aisles and buttresses." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Basilica of Maxentius

"The Basilica of Maxentius has great intersecting vaults, vaulted aisles and buttresses." — Chambers,…

"Sectional view of the old Basilica of St. Peter, before its destruction in the 16th century." &mdash; Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

Basilica of Old St Peter

"Sectional view of the old Basilica of St. Peter, before its destruction in the 16th century." —…

"Section of Basilica of S. Agnese at Rome." &mdash; Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

Basilica of St Agnese

"Section of Basilica of S. Agnese at Rome." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

"Apse of the Basilica, Torcello, with Bishop's throne and seats for the clergy."

Apse of the Basilica

"Apse of the Basilica, Torcello, with Bishop's throne and seats for the clergy."

A roman moulding, called a <em>Bead.</em> It is a molding consisting of a semi-circle on a flat surface. This is also called a <em>Half Round</em>.

Bead

A roman moulding, called a Bead. It is a molding consisting of a semi-circle on a flat surface.…

"Roman bridge at St. Chamas in Southern France." -Breasted, 1914

Bridge

"Roman bridge at St. Chamas in Southern France." -Breasted, 1914

"The usual form of independent monumental tombs was a ponderous tower-shaped block, sometimes square, and sometimes round, with a quadrangular substructure; as, for instance, the tomb of Cæcilia Metella at Rome, which belongs to the time of Julius Cæsar, and which was used in the Middle Ages as a fortress, with battlements added to it.

Tomb of Cæcilia Metella

"The usual form of independent monumental tombs was a ponderous tower-shaped block, sometimes square,…

A bridge built by Julius Caesar and his legionaries to aid in crossing the Rhine River. They are considered masterpieces of military engineering

Caesar's Bridge Over the Rhine

A bridge built by Julius Caesar and his legionaries to aid in crossing the Rhine River. They are considered…

"S. Sominic's Orange Tree, with Campanile of S. Alessio." &mdash; Young, 1901

Campanile

"S. Sominic's Orange Tree, with Campanile of S. Alessio." — Young, 1901

"Campanile and Facade of SS Giovanni E Paolo." — Young, 1901

Campanile

"Campanile and Facade of SS Giovanni E Paolo." — Young, 1901

"Candelabrum in S. Paolo Fuori." &mdash; Young, 1901

Candelabrum

"Candelabrum in S. Paolo Fuori." — Young, 1901

"The Composite or Roman order was the outcome of the attempt to improve the Corinthian, of which it was in fact a somewhat free version." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Composite capital

"The Composite or Roman order was the outcome of the attempt to improve the Corinthian, of which it…

The Roman composite capital is a fusion of the ionic and corinthian capitals.

Roman Composite Capital

The Roman composite capital is a fusion of the ionic and corinthian capitals.

The Roman Corinthian capital is found in the palaces of the emperors in Rome. It is a design of spiral curves that rise from the rows of leaves and unite in pairs. The center of each sides of the abacus is decorated with palmettes or rosettes.

Roman Corinthian Capital

The Roman Corinthian capital is found in the palaces of the emperors in Rome. It is a design of spiral…

"The favorite order was the richly-decorated Corinthian, the beauty of which the Romans strove to increase by adding to it a fulness and strength such as the Greeks never succeeded in attaining." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Roman-Corinthian Capital

"The favorite order was the richly-decorated Corinthian, the beauty of which the Romans strove to increase…

The Roman-Doric capital is an antique design. It is found on the upper termination of a column.

Roman-Doric Capital

The Roman-Doric capital is an antique design. It is found on the upper termination of a column.

The Roman-ionic capital is a design of a scroll rolled on both sides with spiral curves. It has an added neck that is decorated with a palmette ornament.

Roman-Ionic Capital

The Roman-ionic capital is a design of a scroll rolled on both sides with spiral curves. It has an added…

The Capitoline Hill, between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the seven hills of Rome. By the 16th century, Capitolinus had become Campidoglio in the Roman dialect. The English word capitol derives from Capitoline. The Capitoline contains few ancient ground-level ruins, as they are almost entirely covered up by Medieval and Renaissance palaces (now housing the Capitoline Museums) that surround a piazza, a significant urban plan designed by Michelangelo.

Capitoline Hill in Rome

The Capitoline Hill, between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the seven hills of Rome. By…