The United Kingdom Churches and Cathedrals ClipArt gallery offers 131 images of UK places of worship.

In the center of Bury St. Edmunds lies the remains of an abbey, surrounded by the Abbey Gardens, a park. The abbey is a shrine to Saint Edmund, the Saxon King of the East Angles, who was killed by the Danes in AD 869. The town grew around Bury St. Edmunds Abbey, a site of pilgrimage, and developed into a flourishing cloth-making town by the 14th century.

Abbey Gate, Bury St. Edmunds

In the center of Bury St. Edmunds lies the remains of an abbey, surrounded by the Abbey Gardens, a park.…

"As the ruins of Fountains Abbey are a memorial of the iconoclasm of the Reformation movement in England, so are the remains of Melrose Abbey a like monument of the iconoclastic phase of the Reformation in Scotland With the change in doctrines there, the monks of the historic abbey - it was founded in the thirteenth century - were driven out and the beautiful sculptures of the abbey church defaced."—Myers, 1905

Melrose Abbey

"As the ruins of Fountains Abbey are a memorial of the iconoclasm of the Reformation movement in England,…

A large church in Westminster, London, England, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminister. Traditionally, English and British monarchs are coronated and buried here.

Westminster Abbey

A large church in Westminster, London, England, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminister.…

The Westminster Abbey is a Gothic church located in Westminster, London. The church has a pointed style of architecture which signifies the Gothic style.

Westminster Abbey

The Westminster Abbey is a Gothic church located in Westminster, London. The church has a pointed style…

All Saints Church in Wilden, Worcestershire about one mile to the north east of Stourport. It was designed by W J Hopkins with funds provided by Alfred Baldwin very close to his own home, Wilden House and one of his large iron works. It served the Baldwin family and their employees and was consecrated in 1880.

Church of All Saints, Wilden, Worcestershire

All Saints Church in Wilden, Worcestershire about one mile to the north east of Stourport. It was designed…

All Saints' Church, Brixworth, is an outstanding example of early Anglo-Saxon architecture located in central England, and has been called "perhaps the most imposing architectural memorial of the seventh century yet surviving north of the Alps"

All Saints' Church, Brixworth

All Saints' Church, Brixworth, is an outstanding example of early Anglo-Saxon architecture located in…

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the 6th century around c.525 on land given by the king of Gwynedd, Maelgwn Gwynedd. Deiniol is said to have been consecrated as a bishop by Saint David, making him the first Bishop of Bangor. This monastery was sacked in 634 and again in 1073. Nothing of the original building survives.

Bangor Cathedral, Caernarvonshire

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the…

"Tower of Earl's Barton Church, Northhamptonshire." —D'Anvers, 1895

Tower of Barton Church

"Tower of Earl's Barton Church, Northhamptonshire." —D'Anvers, 1895

The Abbey Church of Saint Peter, Bath, commonly known as Bath Abbey, is an Anglican parish church and a former Benedictine monastery in Bath, Somerset, England. Founded in the 7th century, reorganized in the 10th century and rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries, it is one of the largest examples of Perpendicular Gothic architecture in the West Country.

Bath Abbey (Cathedral) Church

The Abbey Church of Saint Peter, Bath, commonly known as Bath Abbey, is an Anglican parish church and…

In 1070 Pope Alexander II ordered the Normans to do penance for killing so many people during their conquest of England. So William the Conqueror vowed to build an abbey where the Battle of Hastings had taken place, with the high altar of its church on the very spot where King Harold fell in that battle on Saturday, 14 October 1066. He did start building it and named it Battle Abbey, though he died before it was completed. Its church was finished in about 1094 and consecrated during the reign of his son William Rufus. It was remodelled in the late 13th century but virtually destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII.

Battle Abbey Gateway

In 1070 Pope Alexander II ordered the Normans to do penance for killing so many people during their…

It was roughly here that the Battle of Shrewsbury of 1403 took place. A church, commonly known as "Battlefield Church", but officially St. Mary Magdalene Church, was built in memory of the thousands who died.

Battlefield Church, Shrewsbury

It was roughly here that the Battle of Shrewsbury of 1403 took place. A church, commonly known as "Battlefield…

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. Architecturally, the choir (alt. spelling quire) is the area of a church or cathedral, usually in the western part of the chancel between the nave and the sanctuary (which houses the altar). A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault or the unit of an opening and its framing on a façade.

One Bay of Choir, Lichfield Cathedral

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English…

Early English style. Northwest transept of Beverly Minster.

Beverly Minster

Early English style. Northwest transept of Beverly Minster.

It is generally regarded as the most impressive (architecturally speaking) church in England that is not a cathedral. Originally a collegiate church, it was not selected as a bishop's seat during the Dissolution of the Monasteries; nevertheless it survived as a parish church, and the chapter house was the only major part of the building to be lost.

Beverly Minster

It is generally regarded as the most impressive (architecturally speaking) church in England that is…

The Church of England parish church of St Michael was built in 1293, supposedly to replace a Saxon church at Water Oakley. It has a number of sculptures which may have come from th earlier church, including a damaged Sheela na Gig. It is best known to brass rubbers for housing the superb memorial brass of 1378 to Sir John Foxley, the Constable of Southampton Castle, and his two wives. One of the local cottages has a tunnel which it is believed leads to the church and served as an escape route for clergymen.

Bray Church, Near Maidenhead, Berks

The Church of England parish church of St Michael was built in 1293, supposedly to replace a Saxon church…

The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the city of Bristol, England, and is commonly known as Bristol Cathedral. Founded in 1140, it became the seat of the bishop and cathedral of the new Diocese of Bristol in 1542. The cathedral has much of interest including unique architectural features, unusual memorials and a large historic organ.Bristol Cathedral was founded as St Augustine's Abbey in 1140 by Robert Fitzharding, a wealthy local landowner and royal official. As the name suggests, the monastic precinct housed Augustinian canons.

Bristol Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the city of Bristol,…

The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry (1129–1148). The abbey's location near the border of Wales meant it was destined to have a turbulent history. The abbey was closed in 1536 by the order of Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, whereupon the estate was granted to Lord Powis.

Buildwas Abbey (Cistercian)

The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry…

Site of the Shrine of St. Thomas, Canterbury Cathedral.

St. Thomas Shrine

Site of the Shrine of St. Thomas, Canterbury Cathedral.

Baptistry at Canterbury Cathedral.

Baptistry

Baptistry at Canterbury Cathedral.

Transept of the Martyrdom at Canterbury Cathedral.

Transept of the Martyrdom

Transept of the Martyrdom at Canterbury Cathedral.

Tomb of the Black Prince at Canterbury Cathedral.

Tomb of the Black Prince

Tomb of the Black Prince at Canterbury Cathedral.

Chapter House and Angel Tower, Canterbury Cathedral

Canterbury Cathedral

Chapter House and Angel Tower, Canterbury Cathedral

The cathedral was founded by Augustine in 602 AD and dedicated to St. Saviour. The Cathedral's first Archbishop was St. Augustine of Canterbury, previously abbot of St. Andrew's Benedictine Abbey in Rome. He was sent by Pope Gregory the Great in AD 597 as a missionary to the Anglo-Saxons.

Canterbury Cathedral

The cathedral was founded by Augustine in 602 AD and dedicated to St. Saviour. The Cathedral's first…

Canterbury Cathedral.

Norman Crypt

Canterbury Cathedral.

"Canterbury Cathedral, which was a key place during the contest with King John. In the quarrel with John of England the issue was not a matter of personal morality, but of Church authority. There was a dispute about the election to the Archbishopric of Canterbury, the most important church office in England. The monks of Canterbury chose one candidate and the king another, and then both parties appealed to the pope. Innocent rejected both candidates and proposed one of his own, Stephen Langton, a man in every way suitable for the office. John refused to submit, and the pope used against him the same means that had been employed to coerce Philip Augustus. He laid England under an interdict, and, though its effect was not so immediate as in France, it finally brought John to terms. Not only was John obliged to accept the pope's candidate, but he went so far as to surrender the kingdom of England to the pope and receive it back as the pope's vassal, paying in token of vassalage a sum of money each year."—Colby, 1899

Canterbury Cathedral

"Canterbury Cathedral, which was a key place during the contest with King John. In the quarrel with…

Canterbury Cathedral.

Christ Gate

Canterbury Cathedral.

Towers of the West Gate at Canterbury Cathedral.

Towers of the West Gate

Towers of the West Gate at Canterbury Cathedral.

The Chair of St. Augustine at Canterbury Cathedral.

The Chair of St. Augustine

The Chair of St. Augustine at Canterbury Cathedral.

It was begun during the reign of King Henry I by the first Bishop of Carlisle, the Englishman Athelwold (1133-1155), who built a moderate-sized Norman minster of which the transepts and part of the nave still exist. The present cathedral has fine examples of stone tracery, mediæval stained glass, paintings and carvings. The building is made of red sandstone, which due to local weather at some places appears black.

Carlisle Cathedral

It was begun during the reign of King Henry I by the first Bishop of Carlisle, the Englishman Athelwold…

"The choir of Canterbury Cathedral was destroyed by fire four years after Thomas Becket was murdered there." -Breasted, 1914. The image is of the choir rebuilt by Henry II.

Cathedral Choir

"The choir of Canterbury Cathedral was destroyed by fire four years after Thomas Becket was murdered…

Norwich Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Norwich in Norfolk, England dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity.

The Cathedral of East Anglia (Norwich)

Norwich Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Norwich in Norfolk, England dedicated to the Holy…

Built between 1175 and 1490, Wells Cathedral has been described as "the most poetic of the English Cathedrals". Much of the structure is in the Early English style and is greatly enriched by the deeply sculptural nature of the mouldings and the vitality of the carved capitals in a foliate style known as "stiff leaf". The eastern end has retained much original glass, which is rare in England. The exterior has a splendid Early English façade and a large central tower.

Wells Cathedral, Somerset

Built between 1175 and 1490, Wells Cathedral has been described as "the most poetic of the English Cathedrals".…

An illustration of the floor plan of Canterbury Cathedral. Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion. Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury.

Canterbury Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Canterbury Cathedral. Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent,…

The Canterbury Cathedral viewe from the front.

Canterbury Cathedral

The Canterbury Cathedral viewe from the front.

An illustration of the floor plan of Durham Cathedral. The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city of Durham, England, was founded in AD 1093 and remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral and has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Durham Cathedral. The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary…

An illustration of the floor plan of Ely Cathedral. Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the Diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Bishop of Ely. It is known locally as "the ship of the Fens", because of its prominent shape that towers above the surrounding flat and watery landscape.

Ely Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Ely Cathedral. Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of…

The Lincoln Cathedral in England is an example of early English Gothic architecture during medieval times.

Lincoln Cathedral

The Lincoln Cathedral in England is an example of early English Gothic architecture during medieval…

An illustration of the floor plan of Salisbury Cathedral.

Salisbury Cathedral

An illustration of the floor plan of Salisbury Cathedral.

An Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill in London, England.

St. Paul's Cathedral

An Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill in London, England.

The place where King Henry VII was laid to rest.

Chapel and Throne of Henry VII

The place where King Henry VII was laid to rest.

Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, West Sussex, England is an Anglican Cathedral. The Cathedral was founded in 1075, after the seat of the bishop was transferred to the town from nearby Selsey. It was consecrated in 1108.

Chichester Cathedral

Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, West Sussex, England is an Anglican Cathedral. The Cathedral was…

Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London. The building originally consisted of a 13th century chancel with chapels to the north and south (c.1325) and a nave and tower built in 1670.

Old Church at Chelsea

Formerly it was the parish church of Chelsea when it was a village, before it was engulfed by London.…

"Doorway of Barfestron Church, Kent." —D'Anvers, 1895

Barfeston Church

"Doorway of Barfestron Church, Kent." —D'Anvers, 1895

Tower of Barton-on-Humber church, Lincolnshire. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture, its period being from the conversion of England to Christianity till the conquest or near it, when Norman architecture began to prevail.

Barton-on-Humber Church

Tower of Barton-on-Humber church, Lincolnshire. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English…

The tower is the only remaining piece of the Earls Barton Church in Northamptonshire, England. It is one of the best examples of Saxon architecture.

Earls Barton Church

The tower is the only remaining piece of the Earls Barton Church in Northamptonshire, England. It is…

Monkwearmouth is an area of Sunderland located at the north side of the mouth of the River Wear. It was one of the three original settlements on the banks of the River Wear along with Bishopwearmouth and Sunderland, the area now known as the East End. It includes the area around St. Peter's Church and was once the main centre of Wearside shipbuilding and coalmining in the town. It is now host to a campus of the University of Sunderland and the National Glass Centre. It is served by the three Church of England churches of the Parish of Monkwearmouth. The locals of the area were called "Barbary Coasters". The borough stretches from Wearmouth Bridge to the harbour mouth on the north side of the river and is one of the oldest parts of Sunderland.

Monkwearmouth Church

Monkwearmouth is an area of Sunderland located at the north side of the mouth of the River Wear. It…

King Edward's Chair, sometimes known as St. Edward's Chair or The Coronation Chair, is the throne on which the British monarch sits for the coronation. It was commissioned in 1296 by King Edward I to contain the coronation stone of Scotland — known as the Stone of Scone — which he had captured from the Scots who had kept it at Scone Abbey. The chair was named after England's only canonized king, Edward the Confessor, and was kept in his shrine of St. Edward's Chapel at Westminster Abbey.

Coronation Chair

King Edward's Chair, sometimes known as St. Edward's Chair or The Coronation Chair, is the throne on…

"Beneath the seat is the celebrated Scottish Stone of Scone, which was carried away from Scotland by Edward I."—Myers, 1905

Coronation Chair in Westminster Abbey

"Beneath the seat is the celebrated Scottish Stone of Scone, which was carried away from Scotland by…

Coronation chair of England in Westminster Abbey.

Coronation chair of England

Coronation chair of England in Westminster Abbey.

Crocket, as seen in Exeter Cathedral in England.

Crocket

Crocket, as seen in Exeter Cathedral in England.

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city of Durham, England, was founded in AD 1093 and remains a centre for Christian worship today. Durham Castle is a Norman castle in the city of Durham, England, which has been wholly occupied since 1840 by University College, Durham. The castle stands on top of a hill above the River Wear on Durham's peninsula, opposite Durham Cathedral.

Durham Cathedral and Castle

The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, commonly referred…

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one of the finest examples of a Norman cathedral in Europe and has been designated a <abbr title="United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization">UNESCO</abbr> World Heritage Site along with nearby Durham Castle, which faces it across Palace Green, high above the River Wear.

Durham Cathedral from the Wear

Founded in AD 1093, it remains a centre for Christian worship today. It is generally regarded as one…

Early English Style, Detached shafts in Lady Chapel, Salisbury Catherdral

Early English Style (Salisbury Cathedral)

Early English Style, Detached shafts in Lady Chapel, Salisbury Catherdral

Elstow Abbey was a monastery for Benedictine nuns in Bedfordshire, England. It was founded c.1075 by Judith, Countess of Huntingdon, a niece of William the Conqueror and therefore classed as a royal foundation. Following the dissolution, the majority of the church nave was blocked off and retained for parish use. The remainder of the church was demolished after 1580. In 1616 Sir Thomas Hillersdon purchased the remaining monastic buildings and incorporated them into a new house, which itself later became a ruin.

Elstow Church, Bedfordshire

Elstow Abbey was a monastery for Benedictine nuns in Bedfordshire, England. It was founded c.1075 by…

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Ely. It is known locally as "the ship of the Fens", because of its prominent shape that towers above the surrounding flat and watery landscape.

Ely Cathedral

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal…

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the Diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Bishop of Ely. It is known locally as "the ship of the Fens", because of its prominent shape that towers above the surrounding flat and watery landscape.

Ely Cathedral

Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal…

The founding of the cathedral at Exeter, dedicated to Saint Peter, dates from 1050, when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. In 1107, William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style. Its official foundation was in 1133.

Exeter Cathedral

The founding of the cathedral at Exeter, dedicated to Saint Peter, dates from 1050, when the seat of…

Eyam churchyard contains a Saxon cross dated to the 7th or 8th centuries. Initially, it was located at the side of a cart track near to Eyam. After the plague it was moved to its present location.

Eyam Churchyard Cross

Eyam churchyard contains a Saxon cross dated to the 7th or 8th centuries. Initially, it was located…

Founded in 1123 by Stephen, Count of Blois, it was built originally for the Order of Savigny. Located in the 'Valley of the Deadly Nightshade' between Dalton-in-Furness and Barrow-in-Furness, the abbey is built entirely out of local sandstone. It passed in 1147 to the Cistercians, who gradually enlarged and rebuilt the original ornate church. The majority of the current ruins date from the 12th and 13th centuries. By the 15th Century it had been completely re-modelled and had become the second richest and most powerful &ndash; as well as one of the grandest &ndash; Cistercian Abbeys in the UK, behind Fountains Abbey.

Furness Abbey

Founded in 1123 by Stephen, Count of Blois, it was built originally for the Order of Savigny. Located…