"The Battle of the Rams at Memphis, June 6, 1862."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Battle of the Rams

"The Battle of the Rams at Memphis, June 6, 1862."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

An illustration of two men sewing sails for a sailboat.

Sail-Making

An illustration of two men sewing sails for a sailboat.

One who follows the business of navigating ships or other vessels.

Sailor

One who follows the business of navigating ships or other vessels.

A piece of cloth or tissue of some kind spread to the wind to impel or assist in impelling a vessel through the water.

Ship Sails

A piece of cloth or tissue of some kind spread to the wind to impel or assist in impelling a vessel…

The Santa Maria, a ship that came to America with Columbus

Santa Maria

The Santa Maria, a ship that came to America with Columbus

A small sharp-built vessel, usually having two masts, with fore-and-aft sails.

Schooner

A small sharp-built vessel, usually having two masts, with fore-and-aft sails.

This painting by Claude Gelle Le Lorrain happens to be one of the oldest etchings in oil. This painting is also know as 'The Ancient Port of Messina'.

Seaport

This painting by Claude Gelle Le Lorrain happens to be one of the oldest etchings in oil. This painting…

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad <em>Monitor</em>, of two guns, and the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, carrying twenty-four guns, March 9th, 1862. But the gloom that had begun to settle on the fort was greatly dispelled when, toward midnight, an iron marine monster, unlike anything that had ever before been seen on the ocean, made its appearance off the forts. It proved to be the Ericsson iron floating battery of two guns, just from new York. The state of affairs was hastily explained to her commander, and she steamed off to the rescue of the deserted <em>Minnesota</em>. When day dawned the Confederate flotilla, flushed with the success of the previous day, bored down on what was supposed to be an easy prey. the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> drawing least water (The <em>Merrimac</em> evidently afraid of grounding) were ahead, when their course was suddenly stopped by the strange craft, which seemed to have dropped from the clouds. They thought to overcome her easily, and opened fire confidently; but a few of the heavy shot of the <em>Monitor</em>, which battered through and through their iron sides, drove them back in panic behind the gigantic <em>Merrimac</em>, against which the <em>Monitor</em> advanced in turn. And then commenced the most extraordinary naval contest known to history- the first battle between ironclad steamers every fought, and one in which all the appliances of modern skill were brought in conflict. The fight lasted for nearly five hours, when the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> fled up the James River, and the <em>Merrimac</em>, disabled, and in a sinking condition, retreated into Norfolk. The <em>Minnesota</em>, having grounded, was then got off, and the <em>Mintor</em>, a proud proof of the designer's genius and skill, rode undisputed monarch of Hampton waters." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Second naval battle

"Second naval battle in Hampton Roads- fight between the Federal ironclad Monitor, of two guns,…

"A semicylindrical piece of wood, fitted with a handle...used for convenience in serving ropes...to prevent chafing. a, serving-mallet; b, 'wormed' rope 'parceled' with canvas; c, serving-yarn." -Whitney, 1911

Serving Mallet

"A semicylindrical piece of wood, fitted with a handle...used for convenience in serving ropes...to…

The Shannon and Chesapeake entering the harbor of Halifax in 1813.

Shannon and Chesapeake Entering Halifax

The Shannon and Chesapeake entering the harbor of Halifax in 1813.

A ship on the water.

Ship

A ship on the water.

A ship on the water.

Ship

A ship on the water.

A ship

Ship

A ship

Any large sea-going vessel.

Ship

Any large sea-going vessel.

A ship in the water.

Ship

A ship in the water.

A ship with its sailors at the maintop.

Ship

A ship with its sailors at the maintop.

The name applied in a restricted sense to a large vessel with bowsprit and three masts, each of which carries square sails, but in an extended sense to vessels adapted for navigation, including all kinds except boats.

Ship

The name applied in a restricted sense to a large vessel with bowsprit and three masts, each of which…

An image of a ship being built in Spain during the 1400's before Columbus' exploration.

Ship Building

An image of a ship being built in Spain during the 1400's before Columbus' exploration.

"Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi- United States war steamer "Mississippi" firing on a Confederate steamer." —Leslie, 1896

Ship Island

"Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi- United States war steamer "Mississippi" firing on a…

A war ship with a high poop deck.

War Ship

A war ship with a high poop deck.

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ship

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ship

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Two ships on the horizon in the ocean.

Ships

Two ships on the horizon in the ocean.

Three ships sailing on the ocean.

Ships

Three ships sailing on the ocean.

An illustration of ships caught in a hurricane.

Ships in Hurricane

An illustration of ships caught in a hurricane.

An illustration of Spanish and English ships with sails at war.

Spanish & English Ships with Sails at War

An illustration of Spanish and English ships with sails at war.

Ships of the 15th century.

Ancient Ships

Ships of the 15th century.

An illustration of a king looking over ships.

King Looking Over Ships

An illustration of a king looking over ships.

Spanish Ships

Spanish Ships

Spanish Ships

A typical slave Dhow.

Slave Dhow

A typical slave Dhow.

Spanish vessels during the exploration of Florida.

Spanish

Spanish vessels during the exploration of Florida.

A Spanish caravel. The vessels furnished by Isabella were only <em>caravels</em>, light coasting ships, without decks, and furnished with cars like the ancient gallys.

spanish caravel

A Spanish caravel. The vessels furnished by Isabella were only caravels, light coasting ships,…

This representation of the vessels of the early Spanish navigators is a fac-simile of a cut in Medina's <em>Arte de navegar</em>, Vallodolid, 1545, which was re-engraved in the Venice edition of 1555. In the variety of changes in methods of measurement it is not easy to find the equivalent in tonnage of the present day for the ships of Columbus' time. Those constituting his little fleet seem to have been liht and swift vessels of the class called caravels. One had a deck amidships, with high forecastle and two were without this deck, though high, and covered at the ends. Captaing G. V. Fox has given what he supposes were the dimensions of the larger one,- a heavier craft and duller sailer than the others. He calculates for a hundred tons, -makes her sixty-three feet over all, fifty-one feet keel, twenty feet beam, and ten and a half feet draft of water. She carried the kind of gun termed lombards, and a crew of fifty men.

Spanish Vessels

This representation of the vessels of the early Spanish navigators is a fac-simile of a cut in Medina's…

"United States troops landing at Baiquiri, Cuba." -Gordy, 1916

Spanish-American War

"United States troops landing at Baiquiri, Cuba." -Gordy, 1916

"The American Line Steamship <em>St. Louis</em>, launched from the Cramps Docks, November 12, 1894."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

St. Louis

"The American Line Steamship St. Louis, launched from the Cramps Docks, November 12, 1894."—E.…

"A steamboat is a boat or vessel propelled by steam acting either on paddles or on a screw. The term especially belongs to steam river craft; ocean-going craft being called steamers, steamships, etc. The first steam-boat was built by Denis Papin, who navigated it down the Fulda as long ago as 1707. Unfortunately this pioneer craft was destroyed by jealous sailors, and even the very memory of it was lost for three-quarters of a century."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Steamboat of 1736

"A steamboat is a boat or vessel propelled by steam acting either on paddles or on a screw. The term…

Outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented by the Chinese, are used to develop geometric thinking and spatial sense. 7 figures consisting of triangles, squares, and parallelograms are used to construct the given shapes.

Boats Outline Tangram Card

Outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented by the Chinese,…

Solutions for outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented by the Chinese, are used to develop geometric thinking and spatial sense. 7 figures consisting of triangles, squares, and parallelograms are used to construct the given shapes.

Boats Outline Solution Tangram Card

Solutions for outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented…

Silhouette outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented by the Chinese, are used to develop geometric thinking and spatial sense. 7 figures consisting of triangles, squares, and parallelograms are used to construct the given shapes.

Boats Silhouette Tangram Card

Silhouette outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented by…

Solutions for silhouette outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams, invented by the Chinese, are used to develop geometric thinking and spatial sense. 7 figures consisting of triangles, squares, and parallelograms are used to construct the given shapes.

Boats Silhouette Solution Tangram Card

Solutions for silhouette outlines of boats (sailboat, ship, yacht) made from tangram pieces. Tangrams,…

A distinguished party aboard.

USS Despatch

A distinguished party aboard.

"The <em>Vandalia</em>, the pioneer propeller on the lakes."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Vandalia

"The Vandalia, the pioneer propeller on the lakes."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

The sinking Varuna, a Union ship.

The Last Broadside of the Varuna

The sinking Varuna, a Union ship.

A ship of the Vikings

Vikings

A ship of the Vikings

American steamship being chased by Spanish man-of-war.

The Spanish Man-of-War Tornado Chasing the American Steamer "Virginius"

American steamship being chased by Spanish man-of-war.

A Roman war ship.

War Ship

A Roman war ship.

War-Ships on the time of Charles II

War-Ships on the time of Charles II

War-Ships on the time of Charles II

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Desperate naval combat between the Confederate iron-plated ram <em>Arkansas</em> and the Federal gunboat <em>Carondelet</em>, at the mouth of the Yazoo River, Tuesday, July 15th, 1862. Next to the ever-memorable combat between the <em>Merrimac</em> and the <em>Monitor</em>, that of the <em>Carondelet</em> and the <em>Arkansas</em> was the most exciting. Like the former engagement, it ended in a drawn battle. On July 14th, 1862, the gunboats <em>Carondelet</em> and <em>Tyler</em> were sent by Commodore Farragut to survey the Yazoo River and ascertain the exact condition of the Confederate iron-plated ram <em>Arkansas</em>, about which there were various reports. They arrived at the mouth of the Yazoo, fifteen miles above Vicksburg, at seven o'clock in the evening, and anchored for the night. Next morning at daylight they tipped anchor and slowly steamed up the Yazoo, the <em>Tyler</em> considerably in advance. About two miles up the river smoke was seen across a little point of land, which, as Captain Gwin of the <em>Tyler</em> surmised, proceeded from the Confederate ram, now rapidly steaming toward the <em>Tyler</em>. In another moment a heavy report was heard from the enigmatical gunboat, and a huge round shot went howling over the deck of the <em>Tyler</em>. Captain Walke of the <em>Carondelet</em> ordered the <em>Tyler</em> to proceed with all speed to alarm the fleet and advise it to prepare for her approach while he engaged the Confederate monster. In ten minutes afterward the <em>Carondelet</em> and <em>Arkansas</em> were alongside each other, and the conflict commenced in earnest. The <em>Carondelet</em> commenced with her bow guns, striking her opponent with a rapidity and precision which the enormous strength of the iron plating alone prevented taking immediate effect. The <em>Arkansas</em> used in return her rifled and guns with terrible effect, some of the shots going right through the <em>Carondelet</em>. Seeing her inability to cope with her antagonist, Captain Walke ran the <em>Carondelet</em> alongside the <em>Arkansas</em> and grappled her. The order "Boarders away!" was instantly passed, and the crew of the Federal gunboat speedily mounted the deck of its adversary. When there they found no foe to engage. The crew of the Arkansas had retired below, and the iron hatches were closed, so that it was uttlerly impossible to go down and continue the action." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Combat at Yazoo River

"Desperate naval combat between the Confederate iron-plated ram Arkansas and the Federal gunboat…