The spider monkey uses its tail in climbing. It uses its tail also to feel with, and to seize small things. The end of the tail is without hair and very sensitive.

Spider Monkey

The spider monkey uses its tail in climbing. It uses its tail also to feel with, and to seize small…

A Spider's spinning apparatus is peculiar. A reservoir inside contains gummy matter from which silk is made. It dries as fast as it is drawn out (Hooker, 1882).

Spider

A Spider's spinning apparatus is peculiar. A reservoir inside contains gummy matter from which silk…

Monkey, a word loosely applied to apes, baboons, Old and New World monkeys, marmosets and lemurs.

Spider Monkey

Monkey, a word loosely applied to apes, baboons, Old and New World monkeys, marmosets and lemurs.

Spider showing unusual shapes and patterns for purposes of camoflauge.

Spider

Spider showing unusual shapes and patterns for purposes of camoflauge.

Spider showing unusual shapes and patterns for purposes of camoflauge.

Spider

Spider showing unusual shapes and patterns for purposes of camoflauge.

The body of a spider consists of two parts, connected by a constricted waist, the unsegmented cephalpthorax and a large, soft, unsegmented abdomen.

Jumping Spider

The body of a spider consists of two parts, connected by a constricted waist, the unsegmented cephalpthorax…

the spinnerets of the common garden spider that are used to spin webs.

Spinnerets

the spinnerets of the common garden spider that are used to spin webs.

The mandibles of the common garden spider.

Mandible

The mandibles of the common garden spider.

Spider, with cocoon attached to spinnerets.

Spider

Spider, with cocoon attached to spinnerets.

Spiders come in many shapes and sizes. Some are poisonous, while others are not.

Spider

Spiders come in many shapes and sizes. Some are poisonous, while others are not.

Crabs are ten-footed crustaceans. The abdomen is tucked out of site, so that nothing is visible except the carapace.

Spider-Crab

Crabs are ten-footed crustaceans. The abdomen is tucked out of site, so that nothing is visible except…

The sea spiders are inhabitants of the sea, and they are very often referred to as crustaceans.

Sea-Spider

The sea spiders are inhabitants of the sea, and they are very often referred to as crustaceans.

Spiders are distinct from insects by having four pairs of legs.

Spider

Spiders are distinct from insects by having four pairs of legs.

Close view of a spiders foot.

Spider Foot

Close view of a spiders foot.

"<em>Genus</em> Eriodes. These have long prehensile tails, with a callosity under the extremity, as in the proceeding genus and that of the ateles. The species are intermediary between the owlers and spider monkeys, in size, form, and character. Three species are known: <em>E. hemidactylus, E. tuberifer,</em> and <em>E. arachnoides.</em>" &mdash;Goodrich, 1885

Miriki

"Genus Eriodes. These have long prehensile tails, with a callosity under the extremity, as…

"The Greek word ateles signifies imperfect, and is applied to this genus in allusion to the absence of the thumb on the hands, which characterizes them. The tail, however, by its extraodinary power, abundantly supplies this defect." &mdash;Goodrich, 1885

Spider Monkey

"The Greek word ateles signifies imperfect, and is applied to this genus in allusion to the absence…

Spider frightened Miss Muffett away.

Miss Muffett

Spider frightened Miss Muffett away.

"Mygale c&aelig;mentaria, typical of Araneida. A, female, natural size: At, chelicer&aelig;; IV', pedipalpi; V', VI' maxillary feet; VII', VIII', thoracic feet; Cth, cephalothorax. B, last joint of pedipalpus of male, much magnified."-Whitney, 1902

Araneida

"Mygale cæmentaria, typical of Araneida. A, female, natural size: At, cheliceræ; IV', pedipalpi;…

"Some, of which the Common Garden Spider, <em>Epeira diadema</em> is an excellent example, construct a beautiful net, composed of stout radiating lines, intersected at tolerably regular intervals by circular filaments." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Garden-spiders

"Some, of which the Common Garden Spider, Epeira diadema is an excellent example, construct…

"Some spiders, like the <em>Ctenizae</em>, close the mouth of their subterranean resdence with a most ingeniously-constructed trap-door, which the inhabitant closes with the utmost pertinacity when any attempt is made to invade the privacy of his domicile. Hence these, of which several species are found in the south of Europe and on the shores of the Mediterranean, are generally known as <em>Trap-door spiders</em>." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Garden-spider and trap-door spider

"Some spiders, like the Ctenizae, close the mouth of their subterranean resdence with a most…

"The most remarkable organs perceptable on the abdomen of the spiders are the <em>spinnerets</em>, by means of which they spin their curious and often beautiful webs, which have attracted the attention and excited the admitation of mankind in all ages. These spinnerets are little teat-like organs, placed close to the extremity of the abdomen, on its lower surface." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Spinnerets of a spider

"The most remarkable organs perceptable on the abdomen of the spiders are the spinnerets, by…

"Another remarkable member of the Araneidae is the Diving Spider, <em>Argyroneta aquatica</em>, which weaves itself a curious little bell-shaped dwelling at the bottom of the water, to which it retires to devor its prey." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Spider, diving

"Another remarkable member of the Araneidae is the Diving Spider, Argyroneta aquatica, which…

"The most celebrated of the Lycosidae is the Tarantula, <em>Lycosa tarantula</em>, of Southern Europe, whose bite is supposed by the natives of Italy to cause death, unless the patient be relieved by music and violent dancing." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Tarantula

"The most celebrated of the Lycosidae is the Tarantula, Lycosa tarantula, of Southern Europe,…

"The spiders with which we in temperate climates are most acquainted are of small size, but in hot regions there are several species whose extended legs occupy a circle of six or seven inches in diameter. Some of these, belonging to the genus <em>Mygale</em>, found in South America and Mexico, are said to attack young humming-birds, and to climb trees for this purpose." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Mygale

"The spiders with which we in temperate climates are most acquainted are of small size, but in hot regions…

"This order, sometimes called the <em>Pedipalpi</em>, or <em>feet-feelers</em>, and which derives its name from the Greek <em>polus</em>, many <em>mera</em>, divisions, and <em>somata</em>, bodies, includes two families, the first of which is the <em>Scorpiondae</em>, characterized by their elongated tail-like abdomen, armed at its extremity with a sort of hooked claw, which, when the creatures are in motion, is always carried over the back in a most threatening attitude." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Scorpion

"This order, sometimes called the Pedipalpi, or feet-feelers, and which derives its…

"In these the back is usually covered with spines and hairs. They generally live in deep water, and rarely approach the shore." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Spinous spider-crab

"In these the back is usually covered with spines and hairs. They generally live in deep water, and…

"The <em>Eriphea spinifrons</em>, for instance, distributed in nearly all seas, has the front covered with numerous sharp spines." &mdash; Goodrich, 1859

Eriphia spinifrons

"The Eriphea spinifrons, for instance, distributed in nearly all seas, has the front covered…

"Atypus sulzeri. (Vertical line shows natural size.)"-Whitney, 1902.

Atypus

"Atypus sulzeri. (Vertical line shows natural size.)"-Whitney, 1902.

"Spider Fly is a genus of dipterous insects, chiefly allied to the forest fly. The insects are parasitical on birds, never on quadrupeds. One species frequently infests the common fowl, the black-cock, and other birds. It is greenish-yellow, with smoke-colored wings."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Spider Fly

"Spider Fly is a genus of dipterous insects, chiefly allied to the forest fly. The insects are parasitical…

"Spider Monkey is a general name applied to many species of platyrhine or New World monkeys, distinguished by the great relative length, slender-ness, and flexibility of their limbs, and by the prehensile power of their tails. A familiar species is the chameck, which occurs abundantly in Brazil. The body is about 20 inches, the tail 2 feet long, and the color is a general black. The coaita, another typical species, has an average length of 12 inches; the tail measures over 2 feet long, and the fur is of a glossy black hue."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Spider Monkey

"Spider Monkey is a general name applied to many species of platyrhine or New World monkeys, distinguished…

"The Tarantula is a large spider, with a body about an inch in length; its bite was formerly supposed to produce Tarantism, and doubtless in some cases, produces disagreeable symptoms. It is a native of Italy, but varieties, or closely allied species, are found throughout the S. of Europe. The tarantulas of Texas and adjacent countries are large species of Mygale."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Tarantula

"The Tarantula is a large spider, with a body about an inch in length; its bite was formerly supposed…

Little Miss Muffet, she sat on a tuffet; Eating her curds and whey; There came a great spider, who sat down beside her, and frightened Miss Muffet away.

Little Miss Muffet

Little Miss Muffet, she sat on a tuffet; Eating her curds and whey; There came a great spider, who sat…

Little Miss Muffet, sat on a tuffet; Eating her curds and whey; Along came a spider, and sat down beside her, and frightened Miss Muffet away.

Miss Muffet

Little Miss Muffet, sat on a tuffet; Eating her curds and whey; Along came a spider, and sat down beside…

Scene from the story, "The Spider and the Fly."

Spider and Fly

Scene from the story, "The Spider and the Fly."

A spider in a web

Spider

A spider in a web

A spider with really long legs, capable of walking on water.

Sea Spider

A spider with really long legs, capable of walking on water.

"Side view of built up armature core. The sheet metal ring sections containing the teeth are fastened into dovetail notches in the spider as shown." &mdash; Hawkins, 1917

Armature core

"Side view of built up armature core. The sheet metal ring sections containing the teeth are fastened…

A spider and its web.

Spider Web

A spider and its web.

Chinese, viciousness, poison. In India it is believed that if a scorpion creeps over the body it causes leprosy and that if one bears the tattooed image of a scorpion he is free from leprosy as well as from the bite of that insect. As a design it is quite common in the borders of Caucasian fabrics, especially the Shirvans.

Scorpion or Spider

Chinese, viciousness, poison. In India it is believed that if a scorpion creeps over the body it causes…

A name for the common British garden spider.

Cross Spider

A name for the common British garden spider.

An extensive division of insects, which includes the scorpions and mites. The spiders differ from most insects in that the body consists of only two segments instead of three, the head and chest being united to form one segment.

Spider

An extensive division of insects, which includes the scorpions and mites. The spiders differ from most…

A species of spider native to southern Europe, especially to the warmer parts of Italy.

Tarantula

A species of spider native to southern Europe, especially to the warmer parts of Italy.

A family of spiders on a web with one caught in it.

Spider Web

A family of spiders on a web with one caught in it.

A small air-ship piloted by bugs crashing in to a spider web.

Spider Web Crash

A small air-ship piloted by bugs crashing in to a spider web.

A beatle taking a look at his new spider neighbor.

Beatle Neighbor

A beatle taking a look at his new spider neighbor.

"Bird-catching Spider, a name originally given to a large spider, Mygale avicularia, a native of Cayenne and Surinam; but which is now more extensively applied, being equally appropriate to a number of large species of Mygale and Epeira, berhaps also of other genera. It has, indeed, been denied by some observers that the name is truly appropriate, but the positive evidence is too strong to be easily set aside by evidence merely negative." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Spider

"Bird-catching Spider, a name originally given to a large spider, Mygale avicularia, a native of Cayenne…

"A genus of spiders, the type of a family called Epeirdae. They are of those spiders which have only a pair of pulmonary sacs and spiracles; construct webs with regular meshes, formed by concentric circles and straight radii; and are furnished with a pair of almost contiguous eyes on each side; other four eyes forming a quadrangle in the center." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Epeira Diadema

"A genus of spiders, the type of a family called Epeirdae. They are of those spiders which have only…

A spider like crustacean of the sea.

Sea Spider

A spider like crustacean of the sea.

"Entosternum of one of the mygalomorphous spiders; ventral surface. Ph.N., pharyngeal notch. The posterior median process with its repetition of triangular segments closely resembles the same process in Limulus." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Entosternum

"Entosternum of one of the mygalomorphous spiders; ventral surface. Ph.N., pharyngeal notch. The posterior…

"Dorsal surface of an entosternum. Ph.N., pharyngeal notch." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Entosternum

"Dorsal surface of an entosternum. Ph.N., pharyngeal notch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Ventral view of a male mygalomorphous spider. I to VI, The six pairs of prosomatic appendages. a, Copulatory apparatus of the second appendage. a, Copulatory apparatus of the second appendage. b, Process of the fifth joint of the third appendage. M, Mouth. pro, Prosternite of the prosoma. mes, Mesosternite of the prosoma: observe the contact of the coxae of the sixth pair of limbs behind it; compare Liphistius where this does not occus. stg, Lung aperture. gn, Genital aperture. a, Anus with a pair of backwardly migrated spinning appendages on each side of it; compare the position of these appendages in Liphistius." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Spider

"Ventral view of a male mygalomorphous spider. I to VI, The six pairs of prosomatic appendages. a, Copulatory…

A garden spider (<em>Epetra diadema</em>) and its web.

Garden spider

A garden spider (Epetra diadema) and its web.

"Closeup of a garden spider's foot, showing the 'combs' for clinging to webs."&mdash;Finley, 1917

Foot of a garden spider

"Closeup of a garden spider's foot, showing the 'combs' for clinging to webs."—Finley, 1917

A common house spider, <em>tegenaria domestica</em>.

House spider

A common house spider, tegenaria domestica.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge lobed; (edge of the lobes entire or sometimes coarsely notched and hollowed at their ends.) Outline - reverse egg-shape. Apex - of lobes, rounded. Base - wedge-shape. Leaf - quite variable in size and shape; four to seven inches long; smooth; pale beneath; the lobes oftenest five to nine, long and narrow, and sometimes widening toward the end, but at other times only three to five, short and broad, and radiating obliquely from the middle rub. Bark - of trunk, slightly roughened (comparatively smooth for an oak), light-gray; in older trees loosening in large, thin scales; the inner bark white. Acorns - usually in pairs on a stem one fourth of an inch or more in length. Cup - rounded saucer-shape, not scaly, but rough and warty and much shorter than the nut. Nut - three fourths to one inch long, slightly egg-shape or oval; brown, sweet, and edible. October. Found - from Ontario and the valley of the St. Lawrence southward to Florida, and westward to Southeastern Minnesota, Arkansas, and Texas. Its finest growth is on the western slopes of the Alleghany Mountains, and in the Ohio basin. General Information - A noble tree, sixty to eighty feet or more in height, with hard, touch wood of very great value in many kinds of manufacturing, and for fuel. The withered, light-brown leaves often cling throughout the winter. The "oak-apples" or "galls" often found on oak-trees are the work of 'gall-flies" and their larvae. When green tiny worms will usually be found at their centre. Quaint reference is made to these galls in Gerardes' "Herbal": "Oak-apples being broken in sunder before they have an hole thorough them do fore shewe the sequell of the yeere. If they conteine in them a flie, then warre insueth; if a creeping worme, then scarcitie of victuals; if a running spider, then followeth great sickness or mortalitie." The oak, probably more than any other tree, has been associated with workshop of the gods. The "Talking Tree" of the sanctuary in Dodona (the oldest of all the Hellenic sanctuaries, and second in repute only to that at Delphi) was an oak. Oak groves were favorite places for altars and temples of Jupiter. The Druids worshipped under the oak-trees. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge lobed; (edge of the lobes entire or sometimes coarsely notched and…

Portrait of Louis XI of France.

Louis XI

Portrait of Louis XI of France.

A spider.

Spider

A spider.

"Garden spider. I., Female garden spider; II., end view of head of the same showing the simple eyes, the poison fangs (ch.), and the pedipalps (p.); III., posterior end of body showing two pairs of spinnerets (sp.), with anus above." -Thomson, 1916

Garden Spider

"Garden spider. I., Female garden spider; II., end view of head of the same showing the simple eyes,…

"Sea-spider (Pycnogonum littorale), from the dorsal surface." -Thomson, 1916

Sea Spider

"Sea-spider (Pycnogonum littorale), from the dorsal surface." -Thomson, 1916

"Male of Nymphon. PR., Proboscis; CH., chelophores; P., pedipalps; E., eggs carried on ovigerous legs; A., rudimentary abdomen." -Thomson, 1916

Nymphon Sea Spider

"Male of Nymphon. PR., Proboscis; CH., chelophores; P., pedipalps; E., eggs carried on ovigerous legs;…