This ClipArt gallery offers 318 images of the Roman Empire including culture, people, everyday life, coats of arms, and more.

"A baker, from pinsere, to pound, since corn was pounded in mortars before the invention of mills. At Rome bread was originally made at home by the women of the house; and there were no persons at Rome who made baking a trade, or any slaves specially kept for this purpose in private houses, till B.C. 173. The name was also given to pastry-cooks and confectioners, in which case they were usually called pistores dulciarii or candidarii. Bread was often baked in moulds called artoptae, and the loaves thus baked were termed artopticii. In one of the bake-houses discovered at Pompeii, several loaves have been found apparently baked in moulds, which may therefore be regarded as artoptieii; they are represented in the preceding cut. They are flat, and about eight inches in diameter. Bread was not generally made at home at Athens, but was sold in the market-place chiefly by women. These women seem to have been what the fish-women of London are at present; they excelled in abuse." — Smith, 1873

Pistor

"A baker, from pinsere, to pound, since corn was pounded in mortars before the invention of mills. At…

The plain of Latium is East of Rome of the Sabine Mountains.

Plain of Latium

The plain of Latium is East of Rome of the Sabine Mountains.

"Pluteus." — Greenough, 1899

Pluteus

"Pluteus." — Greenough, 1899

"Pluteus." — Greenough, 1899

Pluteus

"Pluteus." — Greenough, 1899

"Excavating a house at Pompeii from eruption of Vesuvius, which buried the cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii."—Colby, 1899

Pompeii

"Excavating a house at Pompeii from eruption of Vesuvius, which buried the cities of Herculaneum and…

Amphitheatre at Pompeii

Pompeii amphitheatre

Amphitheatre at Pompeii

Examples of house furniture from Pompeii, Italy.

House Furniture from Pompeii

Examples of house furniture from Pompeii, Italy.

"Porta San Paolo" — Young, 1901

Porta San Paolo

"Porta San Paolo" — Young, 1901

Praetorian guards were responsible for the protection of the Roman emperor.

Praetorian Guards

Praetorian guards were responsible for the protection of the Roman emperor.

"The next Emperor was Aurelius Probus, officer of the army of Germany. He was chosen by the legions, and recognized by the Senate, A certain Florianus, brother of Tacitus, had in the mean tie assumed the purple without recognition by either the civil or the military power; but presently finding himself abandoned, he made an end by suicide. Probus, who was a soldier and man of worth, was thus left in undisputed possession of the throne. His reign of six years was almost wholly occupied in war."—Ridpath, 1885

Probus

"The next Emperor was Aurelius Probus, officer of the army of Germany. He was chosen by the legions,…

"The most famous of all the war-dances of antiquity, is said to have received its name from one Pyrrichos, or, according to others, from Pyrrhus or Neoptolemus, the son of Achilles. Critical scholars, however, content themselves with a general inference deduced from the substantial harmony of the various mythical or legendary accounts given of its origin, that it was a Doric invention." — Chambers, 1881

Pyrrhic Dance

"The most famous of all the war-dances of antiquity, is said to have received its name from one Pyrrichos,…

A Roman foot-race.

Race

A Roman foot-race.

"Pons a Caesare in Rheno factus." — Greenough, 1899

Rheno Factus

"Pons a Caesare in Rheno factus." — Greenough, 1899

"The Pont du Gard near Nimes (ancient Nemausus) in southern France. Built by the emperor Antoninus Pius. The bridge spans two hilltops nearly a thousand feet apart. It carries an aqueduct with three tiers of massive stone arches at a height of 160 feet above the stream. This is the finest and best preserved aqueduct in existence."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Aqueduct

"The Pont du Gard near Nimes (ancient Nemausus) in southern France. Built by the emperor Antoninus Pius.…

Armor used by the ancient Romans in battle.

Roman Armor

Armor used by the ancient Romans in battle.

A legion of the Roman army marching.

Roman Army on the March

A legion of the Roman army marching.

A example of a Roman books, which were made out of rolls of papyrus.

Roman Book Papyrus Roll

A example of a Roman books, which were made out of rolls of papyrus.

"The two chief avenues that were open to advancement were the political and the military. He must be well educated in a general way. Then he must be versed in the law, in statesmanship, and in oratory, or else in the art of war. If he were trained in both disciplines, so much the better."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Roman Boy

"The two chief avenues that were open to advancement were the political and the military. He must be…

Plots of land reserved for use as a military defensive position.

Roman Camp

Plots of land reserved for use as a military defensive position.

"Roman Camp Assaulted." — Greenough, 1899

Roman Camp

"Roman Camp Assaulted." — Greenough, 1899

A cavlaryman of Cæsar's army during the Roman Republic.

Roman Cavalryman

A cavlaryman of Cæsar's army during the Roman Republic.

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass.

Roman cuirass

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass.

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass with scale armor.

Roman cuirass

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass with scale armor.

"Eagle, as a military standard, was adopted by the Romans, and even by nations preceding them in history. The Persians, in the time of Cyrus the Younger, bore an eagle on a spear as a standard. The Romans for some time used the eagle, the wolf, the boar, the horse, and the minotaur for standards, but afterwards abandoned the last four, and confined themselves to the first." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Roman Eagle

"Eagle, as a military standard, was adopted by the Romans, and even by nations preceding them in history.…

"This ship lies besides the wharf at Ostia. In the afterpart of the vessel is a cabin with two windows. Notice the figure of Victory on the top of the single mast and the decoration of the mainsail with the wolf and twins. The ship is steered by a pair of huge paddles."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Freight Ship

"This ship lies besides the wharf at Ostia. In the afterpart of the vessel is a cabin with two windows.…

The spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

The attaching point for the spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The attaching point for the spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

The Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The Roman javelin, or pila.

The Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The Roman javelin, or pila.

A lamp used by the ancient Romans for light.

Roman Lamp

A lamp used by the ancient Romans for light.

"From a monument of the imperial age. The soldier wears a metal helmet, a leather doublet with shoulder-pieces, a metal-plated belt, and a sword hanging from a strap thrown over the left shoulder. His left hand holds a large shield, his right, a heavy javelin."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Legionary

"From a monument of the imperial age. The soldier wears a metal helmet, a leather doublet with shoulder-pieces,…

Roman Pack-wagons and carts carrying goods being drawn by horses.

Roman Pack-wagons

Roman Pack-wagons and carts carrying goods being drawn by horses.

A Roman gladiator-style sandal.

Roman sandal

A Roman gladiator-style sandal.

A Roman School

Roman School

A Roman School

A scene from a Roman wall painting.

Roman School Scene

A scene from a Roman wall painting.

A Roman Siege Works, with A and B, a double wall; C, C, C, Vineæ; D, an Agger; E, a movable tower; F, a ditch.

Roman Siege Works

A Roman Siege Works, with A and B, a double wall; C, C, C, Vineæ; D, an Agger; E, a movable tower;…

A projectile weapon used to throw a blunt projectile.

A Roman Slinger

A projectile weapon used to throw a blunt projectile.

Roman soldiers with spears and shields.

Roman Soldiers

Roman soldiers with spears and shields.

The distinction between rank and unit type doesn't seem to have been as precise as in a modern-day army, in which a soldier has a separate pay-grade, job description, and assigned unit.

Roman Soldiers

The distinction between rank and unit type doesn't seem to have been as precise as in a modern-day army,…

"1, funditor; 2, 2, milites levis armaturae; 3, 3, legionarii; 4, sarcina."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Roman Soldiers and Equipment

"1, funditor; 2, 2, milites levis armaturae; 3, 3, legionarii; 4, sarcina."—D'ooge & Eastman,…

"From a gravestone of the first century A.D. The standard consists of a spear crowned with a wreath, below which is a crossbar bearing pendant acorns. Then follow, in order, a metal disk. Jupiter's eagle standing on a thunderbolt, a crescent moon, an amulet, and a large tassel."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Standard Bearer

"From a gravestone of the first century A.D. The standard consists of a spear crowned with a wreath,…

Roman standards

Roman standards

Roman standards

Roman Sword or gladii. In sheath decorated with carvings.

Roman Sword

Roman Sword or gladii. In sheath decorated with carvings.

"The best preserved of Roman temples. Located at Nimes in southern France, where it is known as La Maison Carree ("the square house"). The structure is now used as a museum of antiquities."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Temple

"The best preserved of Roman temples. Located at Nimes in southern France, where it is known as La Maison…

"The Roman soldiers seem to have used two sorts of tents, one, a tent proper, of canvas or some analogous material, and constructed with two solid upright poles, and a roof piece between them; the other more resembling a light hut, of a wooden skeleton, covered by bark, hides, mud, straw, or any material which afforded warmth." — Chambers, 1881

Roman Tent

"The Roman soldiers seem to have used two sorts of tents, one, a tent proper, of canvas or some analogous…

"Roman Transports." — Greenough, 1899

Roman Transports

"Roman Transports." — Greenough, 1899

Marble hydria from Pompeii.

Roman Vase

Marble hydria from Pompeii.

An ancient Roman villa.

A Roman Villa

An ancient Roman villa.

Writing materials from the Roman empire.

Roman Writing Materials

Writing materials from the Roman empire.

A small cubed marked on its faces with spots numbering from one to six, used in gaming from being thrown from a box or hand.

Roman Die

A small cubed marked on its faces with spots numbering from one to six, used in gaming from being thrown…

"A, via principalis. B, via documana. C, porta praetoria. D, porta decumana. E, portq principalis dextra. F, porta principalis sinistra. G, praetorium. H, forum. K,K, tribuni. L, auxilia. M, ara. N, tribunal. O, equites. P, pedites. Q, fossa. R, via quintana. S, agger. T, intervallum. V, vallum."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Castra Romana

"A, via principalis. B, via documana. C, porta praetoria. D, porta decumana. E, portq principalis dextra.…

"Romans of the Augustan Age." — Quackenbos, 1882

Romans

"Romans of the Augustan Age." — Quackenbos, 1882

A poster about Rome's Republic 509-31 B.C.

Rome Poster

A poster about Rome's Republic 509-31 B.C.

A poster about the Roman Empire 31 B.C.-476 A.D.

Rome Poster

A poster about the Roman Empire 31 B.C.-476 A.D.

A poster about the Rome's social customs.

Rome Poster

A poster about the Rome's social customs.

A poster about Rome's "Legendary Period" 753-509 B.C.

Rome Poster

A poster about Rome's "Legendary Period" 753-509 B.C.

"Constructed by Aurelian and rebuilt by Honorius. The material is concrete faced with brick; thickness, 13 feet; greatest height, 58 feet. This is still the wall of the modern city, although at present no effort is made to keep it in repair."—Webster, 1913

The Wall of Rome

"Constructed by Aurelian and rebuilt by Honorius. The material is concrete faced with brick; thickness,…

An image of Julius Caesar and his army crossing the Rubicon River, which is located in northeastern Italy. The idiom "Crossing the Rubicon" refers to Julius Caesar passing this river in 49 BC, and means to pass a point of no return.

Caesar Crossing the Rubicon

An image of Julius Caesar and his army crossing the Rubicon River, which is located in northeastern…

First walls discovered in Pompeii.

Ruins

First walls discovered in Pompeii.

"The sagum was open in the front, and usually fastened across the shoulders by a clasp. The form of the sagum worn by the northern nations of Europe may be seen in the following cut from the column of Trajan, representing three Sarmatians with saga." — Anthon, 1891

Sagum

"The sagum was open in the front, and usually fastened across the shoulders by a clasp. The form of…