The Ancient Greece ClipArt gallery offers 335 illustration of Greek history, events, and scenes of everyday life. For related images, please see Greek Mythology, Greek Architecture, Greek Ornament, Greek Coins, and the Ancient Greek Musical Instruments ClipArt galleries.

"Shows the head of a thyrsus composed of the leaves and berries of the ivy, and surrounded by acanthus leaves. Very frequently, also, a while fillet was tied to the pole just below the head." — Anthon, 1891

Head of a thyrsus

"Shows the head of a thyrsus composed of the leaves and berries of the ivy, and surrounded by acanthus…

"Tiara or Tiaras, a hat with a large high crown. This was the head-dress which characterized the north-western Asiatics, and more especially the Armenians, Parthians, and Persians, as distinguished from the Greeks and Romans, whose hats fitted the head, or had only a low crown. The king of Persia wore an erect tiara, whilst those of his subjects were soft and flexible, falling on one side. The Persian name for this regal head-dress was cidaris. " &mdash Smith; 1873

Tiara

"Tiara or Tiaras, a hat with a large high crown. This was the head-dress which characterized the north-western…

"On ancient monuments, the torch appears to be formed of wooden staves or twigs, either bound by a rope drawn round them in a spiral form, or surrounded by circular bands at equal distances." — Anthon, 1891

Torches

"On ancient monuments, the torch appears to be formed of wooden staves or twigs, either bound by a rope…

"An ornament or kind of chain, of gold, twisted spiraly, and bent in a circular form, which was worn around the neck." — Anthon, 1891

Torques

"An ornament or kind of chain, of gold, twisted spiraly, and bent in a circular form, which was worn…

"Toques or torquis, an ornament of gold, twisted spirally and bent into a circular form, which was worn round the neck by men of distinction among the Persians, the Gauls, and other Asiatic and northern nations. It was by taking a collar from a Gallic warrior that T. Manlius obtained the cognomen of Torquatus. Torques, whether in the form of collars or bracelets, no doubt formed a considerable part of te wealth of those who wore them. Hence they were an important portion of the spoil, when any Celtic or Oriental army was conquered, and they were among the rewards of valour bestowed after an engagement upon those who had most distinguished themselves." &mdash Smith; 1873

Torques

"Toques or torquis, an ornament of gold, twisted spirally and bent into a circular form, which was worn…

The Tower of the Winds, also called horologion (timepiece), is an octagonal Pentelic marble clocktower on the Roman agora in Athens. The structure features a combination of sundials, a water clock and a wind vane. It was supposedly built by Andronicus of Cyrrhus around 50 BC, but according to other sources might have been constructed in the 2nd century BC before the rest of the forum.

Tower of the Winds

The Tower of the Winds, also called horologion (timepiece), is an octagonal Pentelic marble clocktower…

"They who are within this machine obtain first a view of the place from their high position, and then, by means of small bridges (<em>pontes</em>), descend upon the city walls." — Anthon, 1891

Mobile tower

"They who are within this machine obtain first a view of the place from their high position, and then,…

"Masks used in Tragedy" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Tragedy Mask

"Masks used in Tragedy" — Morey, 1903

"Tribulus, a caltrop, also called murex. When a place was beset with troops, the one party endeavoured to impede the cavalry of the other party, either by throwing before them caltrops, which necessarily lay with one of their four sharp points turned upward, or by burying the caltrop with one point at the surface of the ground. The following wood-cut is taken from a bronze caltrop figured by Cayius." &mdash Smith; 1873

Tribulus

"Tribulus, a caltrop, also called murex. When a place was beset with troops, the one party endeavoured…

"When tripods are said to be given in a present, or as prizes, vases or large bowls supported on three feet are said to be understood." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Greek tripod

"When tripods are said to be given in a present, or as prizes, vases or large bowls supported on three…

"Tripos, a tripod, i.e. any utensil or article of furniture supported upon three feet. More especially, 1. A three-legged table. 2. A pot or caldron, used for boiling meat, and either raised upon a three-legged stand of bronze, or made with its three feet in the same piece. 3. A bronze altar, not differing probably in its original form from the tall tripod caldron already described. In this form, but with additional ornament, we see it in the left-hand figure in the annexed cut. The figure on the right hand represents the tripod from which the Pythian priestess at Delphi gave responses. The celebrity of this tripod produced innumerable imitations of it, which were made to be used in sacrifice, and still mere frequently to be presented to the treasury both in that place and in many other Greek temples." &mdash Smith; 1873

Tripos

"Tripos, a tripod, i.e. any utensil or article of furniture supported upon three feet. More especially,…

"Trochus, a hoop. The Greek boys used to exercise themselves, like ours, with trundling a hoop. It was a bronze ring, and had sometimes bells attached to it. It was impelled by means of a hook with a wooden handle called a clavis. From the Greeks this custom passed to the Romans, who consequently adopted the Greek term. The hoop was used at the Gymnasia, and, therefore, on one of the gems in the Stosch collection at Berlin, which is engraved in the annexed wood-cut, it is accompanied by the jar of oil and the bay branch, the emblems of effort and of victory. On each side of this we have represented another gem from the same collection. Both of these exhibit youths trundling the hoop by means of the hook or key. These show the size of the hoop, which in the middle figure has also three small rings or bells on its circumference." &mdash Smith; 1873

Trochus

"Trochus, a hoop. The Greek boys used to exercise themselves, like ours, with trundling a hoop. It was…

Wooden horse is taken into the city of Troy.

Trojan horse

Wooden horse is taken into the city of Troy.

"Tropaeum, a trophy, a sign and memorial of victory, which was erected on the field of battle where the enemy had turned to flight, and in case of a victory gained at sea, on the nearest land." &mdash Smith; 1873

Tropaeum

"Tropaeum, a trophy, a sign and memorial of victory, which was erected on the field of battle where…

Taking of Troy.

Troy

Taking of Troy.

"The great northeast tower of the sixth city. The stairs to the right date from the eighth city."&mdash;Webster, 1913

Excavations at Troy

"The great northeast tower of the sixth city. The stairs to the right date from the eighth city."—Webster,…

"Trua, Trulla, to perforate; a large and flat spoon or ladle, pierced with holes; a trowel. The following woodcut represents such a ladle." &mdash Smith; 1873

Trua

"Trua, Trulla, to perforate; a large and flat spoon or ladle, pierced with holes; a trowel. The following…

"Turibulum, a censer. The Greeks and Romans, when they sacrificed, commonly took a little frankincense out of the acerra, and let it fall upon the flaming altar. More rarely they used a censer, by means of which they burned the incense in greater profusion, and which was in fact a small moveable grate or foculus. he following wood-cut, taken from an ancient painting, shows the performance of both of these acts at the same time." &mdash Smith; 1873

Turibulum

"Turibulum, a censer. The Greeks and Romans, when they sacrificed, commonly took a little frankincense…

"The Tyrannicides (Copies)" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Tyrannicides

"The Tyrannicides (Copies)" — Morey, 1903

"Vannus, A winnowing van, a bread basket, into which the corn mixed with chaff was received after trashing, and was then thrown in the direction of the wind. Virgil dignifies this simple implement by calling it mustica vannus Iacchi. The rites of Bacchus, as well as those of Ceres, having a continual reference to the occupations of rural life, the vannus was borne in the procession celebrated in honour of both these divinities. In the cut annexed the infant Bacchus is carried in a vannus by two dancing bacchantes clothed in skins." &mdash Smith; 1873

Vannus

"Vannus, A winnowing van, a bread basket, into which the corn mixed with chaff was received after trashing,…

"The Vaphio Gold Cups" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Vaphio

"The Vaphio Gold Cups" — Morey, 1903

"Velum, a curtain. Curtains were used in private houses as coverings over doors, or they served in the interior of the house as substitutes for doors." &mdash Smith; 1873

Velum

"Velum, a curtain. Curtains were used in private houses as coverings over doors, or they served in the…

The Temple of the Wingless Victory.

Temple of the Wingless Victory

The Temple of the Wingless Victory.

"Represents the <em>falx vinitoria</em>, or pruning-knife for vines, to which the <em>ensis falcatus</em> have a close resemblence." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Falx vinitoria

"Represents the falx vinitoria, or pruning-knife for vines, to which the ensis falcatus

"After the fall of Athens Sparta stood without a rival in Greece." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Greek warriot

"After the fall of Athens Sparta stood without a rival in Greece." — Smith, 1882

An assortment of lances, darts, and pikes.

Weapons

An assortment of lances, darts, and pikes.

A Greek woman laying peacefully on an alter.

Woman laying down

A Greek woman laying peacefully on an alter.

"It is a very common error to translate <em>monile baccatum</em>, "a pearl necklace". The ornament of which we are here speaking is frequently shown in ancient paintings, as in the two following cuts." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Women with necklaces

"It is a very common error to translate monile baccatum, "a pearl necklace". The ornament of…

"It is a very common error to translate <em>monile baccatum</em>, "a pearl necklace". The ornament of which we are here speaking is frequently shown in ancient paintings, &c., as in the two following cuts." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Women with necklaces

"It is a very common error to translate monile baccatum, "a pearl necklace". The ornament of…

An illustration of eight different types of Greek women.

Types of Greek Women

An illustration of eight different types of Greek women.

"Wounded Amazon" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Wounded Amazon

"Wounded Amazon" — Morey, 1903

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of union among the various branches of the Greek race, and in keeping alive a feeling of their common origin. They were open to all persons who could prove their Hellenic blood, and were frequented by spectators from all parts of the Grecian world. They were celebrated at Olympia, on the banks of the alpheus, in the territory of Elis." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Wrestling

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of…

The return of Xerxes to Persia.

Xerxes

The return of Xerxes to Persia.

"About the year 480 B.C., Xerxes, an Asiatic king, assailed the country with an army of several millions. He was met by the fearless Greeks with indomitable valor; his squadrons were cut to pieces, and the baffled monarch was driven back in disgrace to his own dominions." &mdash; Goodrich, 1844

Xerxes surveying his army

"About the year 480 B.C., Xerxes, an Asiatic king, assailed the country with an army of several millions.…

"Athens is said to have derrived its name from the prominence given to its worship of Athena by its king erechtheus. The inhabitants were previously called Crannai and Cecropidae, from Cecrops, who, according to tradition, was the original founder of the city. This at first occupied the hill or rock which afterwards became the <em>Acropolis</em>, but gradually the buildings began to spread over the ground at the southern foot of this hill. It was not till the time of Pisitratus and his sons (B.C. 560-514) that the city began to assume any degree of splendour. The most remarkable of these building deposits was the gigantic temple of the Olympian Zeus, which, however, was not finished till many centuries later."&mdash; Smith, 1882

Temple of the Olympian Zeus

"Athens is said to have derrived its name from the prominence given to its worship of Athena by its…