The United Kingdom Churches and Cathedrals ClipArt gallery offers 131 images of UK places of worship.

"Lady Chapel of Gloucester Cathedral, England, looking toward the nave." -Whitney, 1911

Gloucester Cathedral

"Lady Chapel of Gloucester Cathedral, England, looking toward the nave." -Whitney, 1911

The cathedral consists of a Norman nucleus (Walter de Lacy is buried there), with additions in every style of Gothic architecture. It is 420 feet (130 m) long, and 144 feet (44 m) wide, with a beautiful central tower of the 15th century rising to the height of 225 ft (69 m). and topped by four graceful pinnacles, a famous landmark.

Gloucester Cathedral (Abbey) Church

The cathedral consists of a Norman nucleus (Walter de Lacy is buried there), with additions in every…

Salisbury Cathedral, an example of Gothic archcitecture.

Gothic Architecture - Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral, an example of Gothic archcitecture.

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest wooden church in the world, and probably the oldest wooden building in Europe still standing, albeit only in part, since few sections of its original wooden structure remain. The oak palisade walls are often classified as remnants of a palisade church or a kind of early stave church, dated either to the mid-9th or mid-11th century.

Greenstead Church

Greensted Church, in the small village of Greensted, near Chipping Ongar in Essex, England, is the oldest…

In the war between King and Parliament (the English Civil War) the city of Hereford fell into the hands first of one party, then of the other. Once it endured a siege, and when it was taken the conquerors ran riot in the cathedral and, in their fury, caused great damage which could never be repaired. In the early years of the 18th century, Bishop Bisse (1712-21), devised a scheme to support the central tower. He also had installed an enormous altar-piece and an oak screen, and instead of restoring the Chapter House he allowed its stones to be utilized for alterations to the Bishop's Palace.

Hereford Cathedral

In the war between King and Parliament (the English Civil War) the city of Hereford fell into the hands…

There has been a church on the site for over 1300 years since Etheldreda, Queen of Northumbria made a grant of lands to Wilfrid, Bishop of York c.674. Of Wilfrid's Benedictine abbey, which was constructed almost entirely of material salvaged from nearby Roman ruins, the Saxon crypt and apse still remain.

Hexham Abbey

There has been a church on the site for over 1300 years since Etheldreda, Queen of Northumbria made…

The Hospital of St. Cross is a medieval almshouse in Winchester, England, founded between 1133 and 1136 it is the oldest charitable institution in the United Kingdom. The founder was Henry de Blois Bishop of Winchester, grandson of William the Conqueror, half brother to King Stephen of England. Not only is it the oldest but is also the largest medieval almshouse in Britain; it is built on the scale of an Oxford or Cambridge college, but is older than any of the colleges at the universities.

Holy Cross Church, Near Winchester

The Hospital of St. Cross is a medieval almshouse in Winchester, England, founded between 1133 and 1136…

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies the ancient priory church building and is one of the oldest churches in Great Britain. The tower dates from Norman times, and doubtless formed part of the building as restored after the Conquest.

Jarrow Church Tower

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies…

Henry VI planned a university counterpart to Eton College, the chapel being the only portion that was built. The Chapel features the world's largest fan vault, stained glass windows, and the painting The Adoration of the Magi by Rubens, originally painted in 1634 for the Convent of the White Nuns at Louvain in Belgium.

King's College Chapel, Cambridge

Henry VI planned a university counterpart to Eton College, the chapel being the only portion that was…

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. The stone is sandstone and came from a quarry on the south side of Lichfield. The walls of the nave lean outwards slightly, due to the weight of stone used in the ceiling vaulting, some 200–300 tons of which was removed during renovation work to prevent the walls leaning further.

Lichfield Cathedral

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English…

It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years (1300-1549), but the central spire collapsed in the sixteenth century and was not rebuilt. William the Conqueror ordered the first cathedral to be built in Lincoln, in 1072.

Lincoln Cathedral

It was the tallest building in the world for over 200 years (1300-1549), but the central spire collapsed…

"Sectional compartment of the Nave of Lincoln Cathedral." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Lincoln Cathedral

"Sectional compartment of the Nave of Lincoln Cathedral." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"Sectional compartment of the Choir of Lincoln Cathedral." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Lincoln Cathedral

"Sectional compartment of the Choir of Lincoln Cathedral." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

The Lincoln Cathedral (The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln) is a geometric style Gothic cathedral in Canterbury, England.

Lincoln Cathedral

The Lincoln Cathedral (The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln) is a geometric style…

The monastery of Lindisfarne was founded by Irish born Saint Aidan, who had been sent from Iona off the west coast of Scotland to Northumbria at the request of King Oswald around <SMALL>AD</SMALL> 635. It became the base for Christian evangelizing in the North of England and also sent a successful mission to Mercia.

Lindisfarne Priory Ruins before 1860

The monastery of Lindisfarne was founded by Irish born Saint Aidan, who had been sent from Iona off…

In the 14th century religious reformer Canon John Wyclif was Rector in Lutterworth's Parish Church of St. Mary between 1374 and 1384, and it was here that he is traditionally believed to have produced the first ever translation of the Bible from Latin into English.

Lutterworth Church

In the 14th century religious reformer Canon John Wyclif was Rector in Lutterworth's Parish Church of…

Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester and is the seat of the Bishop of Manchester. Although constructed over a period of 600 years, its main architectural style is Perpendicular Gothic, replete with tall windows and flat fan-vaulted ceilings. The interior of the church contains many pieces of period art, notably the medieval woodcarvings of the Ripon Carvers.

Manchester Cathedral

Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester and is the…

In English usage, Minster is an honorific title attached to certain major medieval churches. Most of the best known were cathedrals in the medieval period.

Minster Church, Isle of Sheppey

In English usage, Minster is an honorific title attached to certain major medieval churches. Most of…

A Christian mission has been widely defined, since the Lausanne Congress of 1974, as that which is designed "to form a viable indigenous church-planting movement." This definition is motivated by a theologically imperative theme of the Bible to make God known, as outlined in the Great Commission. The definition is claimed to summarize the acts of Jesus' ministry, which is taken as a model motivation for all ministries.

A Temporary Mission Room

A Christian mission has been widely defined, since the Lausanne Congress of 1974, as that which is designed…

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies the ancient priory church building and is one of the oldest churches in Great Britain. The tower dates from Norman times, and doubtless formed part of the building as restored after the Conquest.

Monkwearmouth Church

The present parish church of St. Peter's at Wearmouth, on the north bank of the River Wear, occupies…

Newstead Abbey, in Nottinghamshire, England, originally an Augustinian priory, is now best known as the ancestral home of Lord Byron. The priory of St. Mary of Newstead, a house of Augustinian Canons, was founded by King Henry II of England about the year 1170, as one of many penances he paid following the murder of Thomas Becket.

Newstead Abbey

Newstead Abbey, in Nottinghamshire, England, originally an Augustinian priory, is now best known as…

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087 and 1314. At its peak, the cathedral was the third longest church in Europe and had one of the tallest spires. Old St Paul's was completely gutted in the Great Fire of London of 1666, which destroyed the roof and much of the stonework. Temporary repairs were made to the building, but while it might have been salvageable, albeit with almost complete reconstruction, a decision was taken to build a new cathedral in a modern style instead, a step which had been contemplated even before the fire.

Old St. Paul's Cathedral

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087…

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087 and 1314. At its peak, the cathedral was the third longest church in Europe and had one of the tallest spires. The cathedral was destroyed in the Great Fire of London of 1666, and the current domed St. Paul's Cathedral &mdash; in an English Baroque style &mdash; was subsequently erected on the site by Sir Christopher Wren.

Chapter House of Old St. Paul's

Old St. Paul's is a name used to refer to the Gothic cathedral in the City of London built between 1087…

In 1522, the priory was surrendered to Cardinal Wolsey, having selected it as a site for his proposed college. However, in 1529 the foundation was taken over by King Henry VIII. Work stopped, but in June 1532 the college was refounded by the King. In 1546, Henry VIII transferred to it from Oseney to the see of Oxford. The cathedral has the name of Ecclesia Christi Cathedralis Oxoniensis, given to it by King Henry VIII's foundation charter.

Oxford Cathedral

In 1522, the priory was surrendered to Cardinal Wolsey, having selected it as a site for his proposed…

Between AD 681 and 689, King &aelig;thelred of Mercia gave estates at Pershore to the Bishop of Worcester for the purposes of establishing a monastery. A monastic community was established at Pershore by 689. The main building was begun in about 1100. The abbey was dissolved in 1539.

Pershore Abbey

Between AD 681 and 689, King æthelred of Mercia gave estates at Pershore to the Bishop of Worcester…

Founded in the Saxon period, the architecture is mainly Norman following a rebuilding in the 12th century. With Durham and Ely Cathedrals, it is one of the most important 12th century buildings in England to have remained largely intact, despite extensions and restoration. Peterborough Cathedral is known for its imposing Early English Gothic West Front (facade) which, with its three enormous arches, is without architectural precedent and with no direct successor.

Peterborough Cathedral

Founded in the Saxon period, the architecture is mainly Norman following a rebuilding in the 12th century.…

This is a plan of the Salisbury Cathedral, England. It is an example of English Gothic architecture. The scale is in feet. &quot;The square eastern termination, the less ambitious height, and the comparatively simple buttress&ndash;system, combine to give the English Gothic cathedral an air of great repose than is found in the magnificent triumphs of French Gothic art.&quot; The grouping &quot;of 'lancet' windows, the piercing of the wall above them with the foiled circles, and the combination of the whole under an enclosed arch, soon led to the introduction of tracery, for which the design of earlier triforium arcades had also afforded a suggestion.&quot;

Plan of Salisbury Cathedral, 1075–1092

This is a plan of the Salisbury Cathedral, England. It is an example of English Gothic architecture.…

People have been coming to worship and pray at Ripon for more than 1,350 years. The Cathedral building itself is part of this continuing act of worship, begun in the 7th century when Saint Wilfrid built one of England’s first stone churches on this site, and still renewed every day.

Ripon Cathedral

People have been coming to worship and pray at Ripon for more than 1,350 years. The Cathedral building…

The present building is widely regarded as one of the finest Norman cathedrals in the country, with a particularly fine doorway at its western (main) entrance. The tympanum depicts Christ sitting in glory in the centre, with Justus and Ethelbert flanking him on either side of the doorway.

Rochester Cathedral, West Door

The present building is widely regarded as one of the finest Norman cathedrals in the country, with…

The lighthouse on the Eastern Heights still stands in the grounds of Dover Castle to 80 foot (24 m) high close to its original height, and has been adapted for use as the bell tower of the adjacent castle church of St Mary de Castro.

Roman Lighthouse, and Part of St. Mary's Church, Dover

The lighthouse on the Eastern Heights still stands in the grounds of Dover Castle to 80 foot (24 m)…

Salisbury Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, considered one of the leading examples of Early English architecture. The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m or 404ft).

Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, considered one of the leading examples…

Tower of Sompting church, Essex. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture, its period being from the conversion of England to Christianity till the conquest or near it, when Norman architecture began to prevail.

Church Saxon Architecture

Tower of Sompting church, Essex. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture,…

The sedilia in Southwell Minster, England. In church architecture, a sedile is a seat near the altar used by priests and deacons.

Sedilia

The sedilia in Southwell Minster, England. In church architecture, a sedile is a seat near the altar…

The Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin at Sherborne in the English county of Dorset, is usually called Sherborne Abbey. It has been an Saxon cathedral (705&ndash;1075), a Benedictine abbey (998&ndash;1539) and is now a parish church.

Sherborne Minster

The Abbey Church of St. Mary the Virgin at Sherborne in the English county of Dorset, is usually called…

The church was originally built by the Saxons around 960, then was adapted by the Normans when William de Braose granted it to the Knights Templar in the 12<sup><small>th</small></sup> century. The church later passed to the Knights Hospitaller in the 15<sup><small>th</small></sup> century.

Sompting Church Tower

The church was originally built by the Saxons around 960, then was adapted by the Normans when William…

The earliest church on the site is believed to have been founded in 627 by Paulinus, the first Archbishop of York, on a visit to the town when he was baptising believers in the River Trent. This legend is commemorated in the Minster's baptistry window. It is considered an outstanding example of Norman and Early English architecture. The distinctive pyramidal spires of lead (or Rhenish caps or "pepperpot" spires as they are known locally), the only example of their kind in the UK, uniquely overlap the footprint of the tower walls and are particularly noteworthy.

Southwell Minster

The earliest church on the site is believed to have been founded in 627 by Paulinus, the first Archbishop…

St. Alban's Abbey, Mainz (Stift St. Alban vor Mainz) originated as a Benedictine abbey, founded in 787 or 796 by Archbishop Richulf (787-813) in honour of Saint Alban of Mainz, located to the south of Mainz on the hill later called the Albansberg. It was turned into a collegiate foundation (Herrenstift) in 1442. The buildings were entirely destroyed in 1552, although the foundation retained a legal existence until its formal dissolution in 1802.

St. Alban's Abbey before the Modern Restoration

St. Alban's Abbey, Mainz (Stift St. Alban vor Mainz) originated as a Benedictine abbey, founded in 787…

This is the only building to survive. It was built c.1365 after its predecessor had been destroyed in the great storm of 1362. Originally the roof was of lower pitch than that of today and covered in lead.

St. Alban's Monastery Gate

This is the only building to survive. It was built c.1365 after its predecessor had been destroyed in…

Saint Alban was the first British Christian martyr. Along with his fellow saints Julius and Aaron, Alban is one of three martyrs remembered from Roman Britain.

St. Alban's Shrine

Saint Alban was the first British Christian martyr. Along with his fellow saints Julius and Aaron, Alban…

Notable is the Saxon church (dedicated to St. Laurence), which may have been founded by St. Aldhelm around 700, and could have been a temporary burial site for King Edward the Martyr. It was re-discovered by Canon Jones in the 19th century, having been used for secular purposes (apparently becoming a house, a school and part of a factory).

St. Aldhelm's Church, Bradfor-on-Avon

Notable is the Saxon church (dedicated to St. Laurence), which may have been founded by St. Aldhelm…

St Asaph Cathedral, (Welsh: Eglwys Gadeiriol Llanelwy) at St Asaph, Denbighshire, north Wales, is sometimes claimed to be the smallest Anglican cathedral in Britain.

St. Asaph Cathedral

St Asaph Cathedral, (Welsh: Eglwys Gadeiriol Llanelwy) at St Asaph, Denbighshire, north Wales, is sometimes…

"Interior, St. Clare's, Liverpool." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

St. Clare's

"Interior, St. Clare's, Liverpool." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589. Between AD645 and 1097, the community was attacked many times by raiders, including the Vikings, however it was of such note as both a religious and intellectual centre that King Alfred summoned help from the monastic community at St David's in rebuilding the intellectual life of the Kingdom of Wessex.

St. David's Cathedral

The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589. Between AD645…

A prominent feature of the Edinburgh skyline, St. Giles' Cathedral or the High Kirk of Edinburgh is a Church of Scotland. The church has been one of Edinburgh's religious focal points for approximately 900 years. Today it is sometimes regarded as the mother church of Presbyterianism. St. Giles was only a cathedral in its formal sense (i.e. the seat of a bishop) for two periods during the 17th century (1635&ndash;38 and 1661&ndash;1689), when Episcopalianism, backed by the Crown, briefly gained ascendancy within the Kirk.

St. Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh

A prominent feature of the Edinburgh skyline, St. Giles' Cathedral or the High Kirk of Edinburgh is…

St. John's Chapel, or the Chapel of St. John the Evangelist, is located in the Tower of London. Dating from 1080, this complete 11th century church is the oldest church in London. A beautiful Romanesque chapel, St. John's is on the second floor of the White Tower, which was built in 1077-97 as a keep or citadel, the oldest part of William the Conqueror's powerful fortress.

St. John's Chapel in the Tower

St. John's Chapel, or the Chapel of St. John the Evangelist, is located in the Tower of London. Dating…

St. Martin's church in Canterbury.

St. Martin's

St. Martin's church in Canterbury.

St. Martin's was the private chapel of Queen Bertha of Kent in the 6th Century before Augustine arrived from Rome. Queen Bertha was a Christian when she arrived in England with her Chaplain, Bishop Liudhard, and King Ethelbert, her husband.

St. Martin's Church, Canterbury

St. Martin's was the private chapel of Queen Bertha of Kent in the 6th Century before Augustine arrived…

"This church occupies the site of a chapel built in the Roman period and standing at the time of the landing of the monk Augustine, in the year 597. Its walls show some of the Roman bricks of the original church."&mdash;Myers, 1905

St. Martin's Church, Canterbury

"This church occupies the site of a chapel built in the Roman period and standing at the time of the…

"St. Martins-in-the-fields." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

St. Martins-in-the-fields

"St. Martins-in-the-fields." —D'Anvers, 1895

In addition to being a parish church in the Diocese of Ely, it is the University Church for the University of Cambridge. As such it has a minor role in the University's legislation: for example, University Officers must live within 20 miles of Great St. Mary's, and undergraduates within three. The church also hosts University Sermons, and houses the University Organ and the University Clock. The latter chimes the Cambridge Chimes which were later used by the clock tower of the Houses of Parliament ("Big Ben").

St. Mary's Church, Cambridge

In addition to being a parish church in the Diocese of Ely, it is the University Church for the University…

A church was established on this site, at the centre of the old walled city, in Anglo Saxon times. St Mary's has one of the most beautiful spires in England and an eccentric baroque porch, designed by Nicholas Stone, facing High Street. In the early days of Oxford University, the church was adopted as the first building of the university, congregation met there from at least 1252, and by the early 13th century it was the seat of university government and was used for lectures and the award of degrees.

Porch of St. Mary's, Oxford

A church was established on this site, at the centre of the old walled city, in Anglo Saxon times. St…

The church foundations date back nearly nine hundred years, being created by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick in 1123. In addition to founding the church, de Beaumont established the College of Dean and Canons at the church. The only surviving part of the Norman church which de Beaumont had built is the crypt. The college was dissolved in 1544, and granted by the crown to the burgesses of Warwick.

Beauchamp Chantry, St. Mary's, Warwick

The church foundations date back nearly nine hundred years, being created by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd…

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The cathedral sits on the edge of London's oldest region, the City, which originated as a Roman trading post along the edge of the River Thames.

St. Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat…

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from the 17th century and is generally reckoned to be London's fifth St Paul's Cathedral, although the number is higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral. The cathedral sits on the edge of London's oldest region, the City, which originated as a Roman trading post along the edge of the River Thames.

St. Paul's Cathedral, London (Interior)

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat…

It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for over 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since 1905. Henry Cardinal Beaufort repaired the church after a 1212 fire. The main structure of the present church was built between 1220 and 1420, making it the first Gothic church in London. Heresy trials occurred in the Galilee chapel in 1555, under Mary I of England.

Choir of St. Saviour's, Southwark

It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship…

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades in the 12th century the church was renamed St. Edmund and the Holy Sepulchre, in reference to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The name eventually became contracted to St Sepulchre.

St. Sepulchre's, Cambridge

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades…

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a parish church in the Church of England. It is often known simply as Shakespeare's Church, due to its fame as the place of baptism and burial of William Shakespeare. The present building dates from 1210 and is built on the site of a Saxon monastery. It is Stratford's oldest building, in a striking position on the banks of the River Avon, and has long been England's most visited parish church.

Stratford-on-Avon Church

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a parish church in the…

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, it was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. The present-day remains of Tintern are a mixture of building works covering a 400-year period between 1136 and 1536. Very little remains of the first buildings; a few sections of walling are incorporated into later buildings and the two recessed cupboards for books on the east of the cloisters are from this period.

Tintern Abbey, Cisternian

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River…

Valle Crucis Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Glyn y Groes or Abaty Glyn Egwestl) is in the Dee (Dyfrdwy) valley about 1&frac12; miles upstream and north of Llangollen, Denbighshire, in north-east Wales. The crucis ("of the cross") in its name refers to the Pillar of Eliseg which stands nearby, which would already have stood for nearly four centuries when the abbey was established in 1201.

Valle Crucis (Cistercian)

Valle Crucis Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Glyn y Groes or Abaty Glyn Egwestl) is in the Dee (Dyfrdwy) valley…

Waltham Abbey was founded in 1030 and a building was constructed on the site by Harold Godwinson (aka King Harold II). In 1177 the abbey was refounded as an Augustinian foundation. The Augustinian abbey was a popular place for overnight stays with kings and other notables who were hunting in Waltham Forest. It was the last abbey in England to be dissolved, in 1540.

Harold's Church at Waltham

Waltham Abbey was founded in 1030 and a building was constructed on the site by Harold Godwinson (aka…