"Form of Raleigh's Ships."—Lossing, 1851

Raleigh's Ships

"Form of Raleigh's Ships."—Lossing, 1851

"Washington's visit to Colonel Rall. This is a copy, by permission, of a picture by Flagg, in the possession of Joseph C. Potts, Esq., of Trenton. On the left is seen Generals Washington and Greene; in the center is Mrs. Potts, and near her stands her husband. On the left Colonel Rall reclines upon a couch, and behind him, supporting his pillow, is his servant. I was informed that the portrait of Rall was painted from a description given by a person who knew him, and who pronounced the likeness good, as he remembered him."—Lossing, 1851

Colonel Rall

"Washington's visit to Colonel Rall. This is a copy, by permission, of a picture by Flagg, in the possession…

"Remains of intrenchments the Ramapo Pass. This view is from the road, looking north toward the village of Ramapo. The remains of the intrenchments are seen along the right in the foreground. On the left, in the distance, is seen a glimpse of the hills on the other side of the narrow valley."—Lossing, 1851

Ramapo Pass

"Remains of intrenchments the Ramapo Pass. This view is from the road, looking north toward the village…

"Monument at Red Bank. This view includes the monument, a portion of the Delaware, and the mouth of the Schuylkill, on the western shore."—Lossing, 1851

Red Bank Monument

"Monument at Red Bank. This view includes the monument, a portion of the Delaware, and the mouth of…

The Red House. The "Red House" is situated upon the street in Wilkesbarre next the river, and about seventy-five rods below the bridge. It is the place where John Franklin was arrested. On his return from a political tour down the valley, he came up by the way of Hanover to Wilkesbarre. While standing near the ferry, an acquaintance came up to him and said, "A friend at the Red House wishes to speak to you." Franklin walked to the house, where a person caught him from behind, and attempted to pinion his hands. He was a powerful man, and shook off his captors; but, a noose being thrown over his head, he was secured. They then attempted to get him on horseback, when he cried out, "Help, help! William Slocum! where is William Slocum?" and, drawing his pistols, discharged one, but without effect. He was felled by a blow, and laid almost senseless. It was seeding time, and nearly all the men were in the fields. But the Yankee blood of Mrs. Slocum (the mother of the "lost sister") was up, and, seizing a gun, she ran to the door, exclaiming, "William! Who will call William? Is there no man here? Will nobody rescue him?" Colonel Pickering's dwelling was near the "Red House." It is still standing, but so modernized that its original character is lost.

Red House

The Red House. The "Red House" is situated upon the street in Wilkesbarre next the river, and about…

"View from the site of the Redoubt. This view is from the mounds looking northwest, up the York River. The first head-land on the right is Gloucester Point, and upon the high bank on the left is situated the village of Yorktown. The dark spot in the bank indicates the place of the so-called <em>Cornwallis' Cave</em>."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Redoubt

"View from the site of the Redoubt. This view is from the mounds looking northwest, up the York River.…

(--1780) provided relief to American soldiers in the revolution. Wife of General Joseph Reed.

Esther Reed

(--1780) provided relief to American soldiers in the revolution. Wife of General Joseph Reed.

The alert given by Paul Revere to his fellow patriots. The Regular army is the permanent army of a country that is maintained during peacetime.

The Regulars Are Coming

The alert given by Paul Revere to his fellow patriots. The Regular army is the permanent army of a country…

"The Regulator battle-ground. This view is from the south side of the Salisbury Road, which is marked by the fence on the left. The belligerents confronted in the open field seen on the north of the road, beyond the fence. Between the blasted pine, to which a muscadine is clinging, and the road, on the edge of a small morass, several of those who were slain in that engagement were buried. I saw the mounds of four graves by the fence, where the sheep, seen in the picture, are standing. The tree by the road side is a venerable oak, in which are a few scars produced by the bullets."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Regulator Battle-ground

"The Regulator battle-ground. This view is from the south side of the Salisbury Road, which is marked…

Cellar of the Reidesel house.

Reidesel Cellar

Cellar of the Reidesel house.

The Reidesel house, Saratoga.

Reidesel House

The Reidesel house, Saratoga.

Virtual representation, 1775. 1. One String Jack, Deliver your property. 2. Begar, just so in France. 3. Te Deum. 4. I give you that man's money for my use. 5. I will not be robbed. 6. I shall be wounded with you. 7. I am blinded. 8. The French Roman Catholic town of Quebec. 9. The English Protestant town of Boston.

Representation of 1775

Virtual representation, 1775. 1. One String Jack, Deliver your property. 2. Begar, just so in France.…

"Scene of the engagement on Rhode Island, Aug. 29, 1778."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Rhode Island

"Scene of the engagement on Rhode Island, Aug. 29, 1778."—Lossing, 1851

Isaac Rice was the name of our octegenarian guide. Like scores of those who fought our battles for freedom, and lived the allotted term of human life, he is left in his evening twilight to depend upon the cold friendship of the world for sustenance, and to feel the practical ingratitude of a people reveling in the enjoyment which is privations in early manhood contributed to secure.

Isaac Rice

Isaac Rice was the name of our octegenarian guide. Like scores of those who fought our battles for freedom,…

Place of the barricade, Ridgefield. This view is at the north end of the main street. It was taken from the spot where, traditions asserts, Arnold's horse was killed, which is on the west side of the street, near a maple-tree, about one hundred yards southwest of the house of Samuel Stebbins, Esq., seen on the right in the picture. While making this sketch an old man came along, and informed me that on the day after the battle himself and some other boys skinned Arnold's horse, and discovered nine bullet-holes in his side. The escape of the rider seemed miraculous.

Ridgefield

Place of the barricade, Ridgefield. This view is at the north end of the main street. It was taken from…

"The Riedesel House, Cambridge. This is from a pencil sketch by Mr. Longfellow. I am also indebted to him for the fac-simile of the autograph of the Baroness of Riedesel. It will be perceived that the <em>i</em> is placed before the <em>e</em> in spelling the name. I have heretofore given it with the <em>e</em> first, which is according to the orthography in Burgoyne's <em>State of the Expedition</em>, wherein I supposed it was spelled correctly. This autograph shows it to be erroneous. Mr. Longfellow's beautiful poem, 'The Open Window,' refers to this mansion."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Riedesel House

"The Riedesel House, Cambridge. This is from a pencil sketch by Mr. Longfellow. I am also indebted to…

Riedesel was the commander of a regiment of soldiers from the Duchy of Brunswick (Braunschweig) among the German units hired by the British during the American Revolution.

Frederick Adolph Riedesel

Riedesel was the commander of a regiment of soldiers from the Duchy of Brunswick (Braunschweig) among…

A river bateau. Bateaux were rudely constructed of logs and planks, broad and without a keel. They had small draught, and would carry large loads in quite shallow water. In still water and against currents they were propelled by long driving-poles. The ferry-scows or flats on the southern and western rivers are very much like the old bateaux. They were sometimes furnished with a mast for lakes and other deep water, and had cabins erected on them.

River Bateau

A river bateau. Bateaux were rudely constructed of logs and planks, broad and without a keel. They had…

The home of Beverly Robinson, a commander of the Loyal American Regiment. He is known for his work with the British secret service during the American Revolution.

The Beverly Robinson House

The home of Beverly Robinson, a commander of the Loyal American Regiment. He is known for his work with…

The house of Beverly Robinson occupied by Benedict Arnold.

The Robinson House

The house of Beverly Robinson occupied by Benedict Arnold.

A hall in the house of Beverly Robinson. This house was also the headquarters of Benedict Arnold.

Hall in the Beverly Robinson House

A hall in the house of Beverly Robinson. This house was also the headquarters of Benedict Arnold.

Beverly Robinson was a military officer born in Virginia in 1764 who fought in the American Revolution.

Beverly Robinson

Beverly Robinson was a military officer born in Virginia in 1764 who fought in the American Revolution.

"View at Rocky Mount. This view is from the garden-gate at Mrs. Barkley's, looking northeast. On the left is seen part of a store-house, and on the right, just beyond the post with a pigeon-house, is a hollow, within which are the remains of houses. At the foot of the hill may still be seen the foundations of the house mentioned in the text as having been occupied by the British when attacked by Sumter. The small log buildings across the center, occupying the slope where the conflict occurred, are servants' houses."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Rocky Mount

"View at Rocky Mount. This view is from the garden-gate at Mrs. Barkley's, looking northeast. On the…

Roger's Rock. This sketch is from the lake, a little south of Cook's Point, seen just over the boat on the left. Immediately beyond is seen the smooth rock. Nearly opposite the 'slide' is Anthony's Nose, a high, rocky promontory, having the appearance of a human nose in shape when viewed from a particular point.

Roger's Rock

Roger's Rock. This sketch is from the lake, a little south of Cook's Point, seen just over the boat…

"View at Rugeley's. This view is from the south side of the bridge. The counterfeit cannon was placed in the road where the first wagon is seen. The house and barn of Rugeley were in the cleared field seen beyond the wagons."—Lossing, 1851

Rugeley's

"View at Rugeley's. This view is from the south side of the bridge. The counterfeit cannon was placed…

(1739-1800) First president of South Carolina that also fought in the Revolutionary war.

Governor John Rutledge

(1739-1800) First president of South Carolina that also fought in the Revolutionary war.

Sabbath Day Point. It is between three and four miles from the little village of Hague, in the midst of the most picturesque scenery imaginable. Here, in 1756, a small provincial force, pressed by a party of French and Indians, and unable to escape across the lake, made a desperate resistance, and defeated the enemy with considerable slaughter.

Sabbath Day Point

Sabbath Day Point. It is between three and four miles from the little village of Hague, in the midst…

"View at Sander's Creek. This view is from the north side of the Creek. like the other stream, it is filled with canes, shrubs, and many blasted pines."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Sander's Creek

"View at Sander's Creek. This view is from the north side of the Creek. like the other stream, it is…

"The sarcophagus of Washington. This was placed in the family vault in the autumn of 1837."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Sarcophagus of Washington

"The sarcophagus of Washington. This was placed in the family vault in the autumn of 1837."—Lossing,…

Savin's Rock. This is a view of the spot where Farth landed, in Orange, formerly West Haven. It is between three and four miles below New Haven, on the western side of the harbor entrance, and is a place of considerable resort in summer for the people of the city.

Savin's Rock

Savin's Rock. This is a view of the spot where Farth landed, in Orange, formerly West Haven. It is between…

"Place where Colonel Scammell was killed."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Scammell Killed

"Place where Colonel Scammell was killed."—Lossing, 1851

"School-house where Thomas Jefferson received his early education." -Gordy, 1916

Schoolhouse

"School-house where Thomas Jefferson received his early education." -Gordy, 1916

Geneal Shuyler and baroness Reidesel.

Schuyler and Reidesel

Geneal Shuyler and baroness Reidesel.

General Schuyler's Head-Quarters.

Schuyler's Head-Quarters

General Schuyler's Head-Quarters.

The home of General Schuyler of the American Revolution.

General Schuyler's House

The home of General Schuyler of the American Revolution.

General Schuyler's mansion.

Schuyler's Mansion

General Schuyler's mansion.

Schuyler's Mansion. This view is from Schuyler Street. The edifice is of brick, having a closed octagonal porch or vestibule in front. It was built by Mrs. Schuyler while her husband was in England in 1760-1. The old family mansion, large and highly ornamented, in the Dutch style, stood nearly upon the site of the present City Hall, between State and Washington Streets. It was taken down in 1800.

Schuyler's Mansion

Schuyler's Mansion. This view is from Schuyler Street. The edifice is of brick, having a closed octagonal…

The mill of General Schuyler, an American Revolution war general.

General Schuyler's Mill

The mill of General Schuyler, an American Revolution war general.

Shuyler's Mills, Saratoga.

Schuyler's Mills

Shuyler's Mills, Saratoga.

"Bishop Seabury's Monument. The following is the inscription upon the slab: 'Here lieth the body of Samuel Seabury, D.D., bishop of Connecticut and Rhode Island, who departed from this transitory scene February 25th, Anno Domini 1796, in the 68th year of his age, and the 12th of his Episcopal consecration."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Seabury's Monument

"Bishop Seabury's Monument. The following is the inscription upon the slab: 'Here lieth the body of…

"Fight between the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Serapis

"Fight between the Bon Homme Richard and the Serapis."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Armed settlers.

settlers

Armed settlers.

"A scene at Springfield, during Shay's Rebellion, when the mob attempted to prevent the holding of the Courts of Justice."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Shay's Rebellion

"A scene at Springfield, during Shay's Rebellion, when the mob attempted to prevent the holding of the…

View from Shole's Landing. This is a view from Chipman's Point, or Sholes's Landing, looking north. The high ridge on the right, in the distance, is Mount Independence. The higher and more distant hill on the left, over the cedar, is Mount Defiance, and the elevation beyond is Mount Hope. Fort Ticonderoga is on the other side of Mount Independence, in a line with the highest part.

Sholes's Landing

View from Shole's Landing. This is a view from Chipman's Point, or Sholes's Landing, looking north.…

"Lake Sinnipink, or Bloody Pond. This view is from the outlet of the lake, within a few rods of the spot where a large number of the Americans and British were slain in a preliminary skirmish on the afternoon when the forts were taken. The bodies were thrown into the lake, and from that circumstance it was afterward called Bloody Pond."—Lossing, 1851

Lake Sinnipink

"Lake Sinnipink, or Bloody Pond. This view is from the outlet of the lake, within a few rods of the…

"Bridge over Sleepy Hollow Creek. Ichabod, according to Irving, in the <em>Legend</em>, returning from a late evening tarry with Katrina Van Tassel, on his lean steed Gunpowder, was chased by a huge horseman, without a head, from the Andre tree to the bridge. 'He saw the walls of the church dimly gleaming under the trees beyond. He recollected the place where Brom Bones' ghostly competitor had disappeared. "If I can reach that bridge," thought Ichabod, "I am safe." Just then he heard the black steed panting and blowing close behind him; he even fancied that he felt his hot breath. Another compulsive kick in the ribs, and old Gunpowder sprang upon the bridge; he thundered over the resounding planks; he gained the opposite side; and now Ichabod cast a look behind, to see if his pursuer should vanish, according to rule, in a flash of fire and brimstone. Just then he saw the goblin rising in his stirrups, and in the very act of hurling his head at him. Ichabod endeavored to dodge the horrible missile, but too late; it encountered his cranium with a terrible crash; he was tumbled headlong into the dust, and Gunpowder, the black steed, and the goblin rider, passed like a whirlwind.' A shattered pumpkin was found on the road the next day, but Ichabod had gone to parts unknown. Brom Bones, his rival, soon afterward let the pretty Katrina to the altar. The good country people always maintained that Ichabod was spirited away by the <em>headless horseman</em>, who was the ghost of a Hessian soldier, whose body, deprived of its caput by a cannon-ball, ws sleeping in the church-yard near."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Sleepy Hollow

"Bridge over Sleepy Hollow Creek. Ichabod, according to Irving, in the Legend, returning from…

"Ancient Dutch Church in Sleepy Hollow. This view is from the church-yard, looking southwest. The porch seen on the right fronts upon the highway, and is a modern addition, the ancient entrance being on the south side. This is believed to be the oldest church in existence in this state, having been erected, according to inscription upon a stone tablet upon its front, by Vredryck Flypsen (Frederic Philips) and Catharine his wife, in 1699. It is built of brick and stone, the former having been imported from Holland for the express purpose. The old flag-shaped vane, with the initials of the founder cut out of it, yet turns upon its steeple, and in the little tower hangs the ancient bell, bearing this inscription: 'Si. Deus. Pro. Nobis. Quis. Contra. Nos. 1685.' The pulpit and communion-table were imported from Holland; the latter alone has escaped the ruthless hand of modern improvement."—Lossing, 1851

Sleepy Hollow Church

"Ancient Dutch Church in Sleepy Hollow. This view is from the church-yard, looking southwest. The porch…

(1732-1792) Served with the British army during the French and Indian War. He led troops in the American Revolutionary War.

William Smallwood

(1732-1792) Served with the British army during the French and Indian War. He led troops in the American…

"Smith's House. This view is from the slope in front of the house. The main building is of stone; the wings are wood. The piazza in front of the main building, and the balustrades upon the top, are the only modern additions; otherwise the house appears the same as when Arnold and Andre were there. It stands upon a slope of <em>Treason Hill</em>, a few rods west of the road leading from Stony Point to Haverstraw, and about half way between the two places. It was in a room in the second story that the conspirators remained during the day of their arrival. The present owner of the house and grounds is Mr. William C. Houseman."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Smith's House

"Smith's House. This view is from the slope in front of the house. The main building is of stone; the…

"Society of the Cincinnati, member's certificate. This engraving is a fac simile of a certificate, about one fourth the size of the original, which is thirteen inches and a half in breadth, and twenty inches in length. The originals are printed on fine vellum. The plate was engraved in France by J. J. le Veau, from a drawing by Aug. le Belle. I am indebted to the late James G. Wilson, son of Ensign Wilson, named in the certificate, for the use of the orginal in making this copy. The former was engraved on copper; this is engraved on wood. The design represents American liberty as a strong man armed, bearing in one hand the Union flag, and in the other a naked sword. Beneath his feet are British flags, and a broken spear, shield, and chain. Hovering by his side is the eagle, our national emblem, from whose talons the lightning of destruction is flashing upon the British lion. Britannia, with the crown falling from her head, is hastening toward a boat to escape to a fleet, which denotes the departure of British power from our shore. Upon a cloud, on the right, is an angel blowing a trumpet, from which flutters a loose scroll."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Society of the Cincinnati

"Society of the Cincinnati, member's certificate. This engraving is a fac simile of a certificate, about…

"Rattlesnake Flag of South Carolina, during independence of the states."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

South Carolina flag

"Rattlesnake Flag of South Carolina, during independence of the states."—E. Benjamin Andrews,…

"South Carolina Flag."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

South Carolina Flag

"South Carolina Flag."—Lossing, 1851

"The Old South Meeting-house was used for a riding school."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

The Old South

"The Old South Meeting-house was used for a riding school."—Coffin, 1879

"A southern school-house during the American Revolution."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Southern School-House

"A southern school-house during the American Revolution."—Lossing, 1851

"Speaker's desk and Winslow's chair. This desk is made of ash. The semicircular front is about three feet in diameter. The chair, which belonged to Governor Winslow, is of English oak. It was made in 1614."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Speaker's Desk and Winslow's Chair

"Speaker's desk and Winslow's chair. This desk is made of ash. The semicircular front is about three…

Split Rock. Soldiers left from Chimney Point to Crown Point.

Split Rock

Split Rock. Soldiers left from Chimney Point to Crown Point.

Military establishment at St. John's. This view is taken from the eastern side of the river, near the remains of a block-house erected by Montgomery when he besieged the fort in 1775. On the right is seen the fort, which incloses the magazine; in the center is the building occupied by the officers, on either side of which are the barracks of the soldiers. The large building on the left is the hospital, and the smaller one still further left is the dead-house. The river here is about a quarter of a mile wide. The present military works are upon the site of those of the Revolution.

St. John's

Military establishment at St. John's. This view is taken from the eastern side of the river, near the…

St. John's, on the Richelieu or Sorel.

St. John's

St. John's, on the Richelieu or Sorel.

St. John's Gate, outside.

St. John's Gate

St. John's Gate, outside.

"Stamp from the Stamp Act. The first direct issue of importance between the colonies and England came when Parliament undertook to lay a tax to be collected by officers appointed for the purpose. This was the Stamp Act, by which it was required that a stamp should be affixed to any deed, contract, bill of sale, will, and the like, made in America before it could be legal. These stamps were to be made in England and sent over to American to be sold by the government officers. It was intended that the money thus raised should be used for the support of the king's troops in America. The Stamp Act was passed by Parliament in March, 1765, and as soon as this was known in America, the colonies, from one end of the land to the other, were full of indignation. Parliament, they said, might make laws to regulate the commerce of the empire, and so draw revenue from America; but it had no right to lay a direct tax like this. Only the colonial governments, elected by the people, could lay such a tax."&mdash;Scudder, 1897

Stamp Act

"Stamp from the Stamp Act. The first direct issue of importance between the colonies and England came…