The 1861-1865 Civil War Other Events ClipArt gallery includes 133 illustrations of other important events that occurred during the American Civil War.

When General McClellan reached Locst Hill, on april 2nd, 1862, he found fifty-eight thousand men and much of his artillery there. The following day he moved his whole army toward Yorktown, in order to prevent, if possible, Johnston's re-enforcement of General Magruder, expecting to receive in time for the co-operation of the naval force in Hampton Roads, which he thought would reduce the Confederate batteries both on the James and York Rivers.

Advance of the Federal Army towards Yorktown

When General McClellan reached Locst Hill, on april 2nd, 1862, he found fifty-eight thousand men and…

"Major Anderson removing his forces from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, December 26, 1861."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Anderson's forces

"Major Anderson removing his forces from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, December 26, 1861."—E.…

Column of troops with wagons marching through the woods.

Marching to the Battlefield - Ball's Bluff

Column of troops with wagons marching through the woods.

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

Group of soldiers escorting a corpse on a wagon.

Duryea's Zouaves at Big Bethel Brining Off Grebel's Body

Group of soldiers escorting a corpse on a wagon.

"Cavalry skirmishers advancing on the Confederate position in the pass of the Blue Ridge."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Blue Ridge

"Cavalry skirmishers advancing on the Confederate position in the pass of the Blue Ridge."— Frank…

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road to Yorktown." —Leslie, 1896

Howard's Bridge and Mill

"Advance of the Federal troops, near Howard's Bridge and Mill, four miles from Big Bethel, on the road…

"Recruiting in Philadelphia, Pa., for the Bucktail Pennsylvania Regiment, August, 1862. This famous regiment suffered so much that recruiting became necessary. As it was a Pennsylvania pet regiment, Philadelphia was all alive with the resounding music of the horns, calling upon all who had killed a buck in fair combat to accept an invitation to their supper of glory. Our artist has, however, told more with a few dashes of his pencil than we can in a column. The Bucktails were a splendid set of fellows, and deserved the reputation they achieved. The fight at Dranesville, the Valley of the Shenandoah and the battle of Cross Keys have been consecrated by their valor. It will be remembered that when Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham of the First New Jersey Cavalry fell into an ambuscade the gallant Bucktails volunteered to his rescue, and were terribly cut up."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bucktail Recruit

"Recruiting in Philadelphia, Pa., for the Bucktail Pennsylvania Regiment, August, 1862. This famous…

"Traveling in state"- General Burnside on the road from New Berne to Beaufort, N. C.

General Burnside

"Traveling in state"- General Burnside on the road from New Berne to Beaufort, N. C.

"Major General Burnside assuming command of the Army of the Potomac- issuing orders to his staff. 'Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, November 10th, 1862. In accordance with General Orders, No. 182, issued by the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. Patriotism, and the exercise of my every energy in the direction of this army, aided by the full and hearty co-operation of its officers and men, will I hope, under the blessing of God, insure its success. Having been a sharer of the privations, and a witness of the bravery of the old Army of the Potomac in the Maryland campaign, and fully identified with them in their feelings of respect and esteem for General McClellan, entertained through a long and most friendly association with him, I feel that it is not as a stranger I assume command. To the Ninth Army Corps, so long and intimately associated with me, I need say nothing; our histories are identical. With diffidence for myself, but with a proud confidence in the unswerving loyalty and determination of the gallant army now intrusted to my care, I accept its control, with the steadfast assurance that the just cause must prevail. A. E. Burnside, Major General Commanding.' Our illustration represents the general issuing orders to his staff immediately after assuming command." — Frank Leslie, 1896

General Burnside

"Major General Burnside assuming command of the Army of the Potomac- issuing orders to his staff. 'Headquarters,…

An illustration of a Calvary charging.

Calvary Charge

An illustration of a Calvary charging.

"Execution of Captain Wirz at Washington, D. C., Friday, November 10th, 1865."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Captain Wirz's execution

"Execution of Captain Wirz at Washington, D. C., Friday, November 10th, 1865."— Frank Leslie,…

"Lieutenant J. H. Raymond capturing the Confederate flag from the burning Confederate steamer <em>Fanny</em>, at the action off Elizabeth City, N. C., February 11th, 1862. Our sketch represents Lieutenant Raymond rushing on board the Confederate steamer <em>Fanny</em> and carrying off, through flame and smoke, the Confederate flag which was still flying on board the vessel. This heroic act was performed in the battle before Elizabeth City."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

capture Confederate flag

"Lieutenant J. H. Raymond capturing the Confederate flag from the burning Confederate steamer Fanny,…

"Reception of Brigadier General Corcoran by Mayor Opdyke and the citizens of New York, at Castle Garden, August 22nd, 1862. Mayor Opdyke escorting the general to his carriage. The 22nd of August, 1862, will be a memorable day for our Irish citizens, for on that day the people of New York turned out to give a hearty welcome to- not a victorious soldier, but to the true and patient man who had for thirteen months endured the worst of captivities to a brave soldier, compulsory inaction, when he knows his gallant companions are fighting for a great cause almost within cannon shot of his dungeon. And the reception was not given alone to the released general, but to everyone of those patient thousands who have suffered an equally cruel ordeal, although their names are unwept, unhonored and unsung. In this view, the oration which greeted the brave Corcoran was a noble and remarkabe one, and worthy of the great city that gave it."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Castle Garden

"Reception of Brigadier General Corcoran by Mayor Opdyke and the citizens of New York, at Castle Garden,…

"Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, after their successful raid into Pennsylvania, escaping with their stolen horses into virginia by the lower fords of the Potomac, Sunday, October 12th 1862." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Stuart's Cavalry

"Stuart's Confederate Cavalry, after their successful raid into Pennsylvania, escaping with their stolen…

"The advance upon Charleston, S. C.- pioneer movement- landing of the One Hundredth New York Volunteers upon Cole's Island, March 28th, 1863. On the morning of the 28th of March, 1863, the One Hundredth New York Volunteers, Colonel G. B. Danby, landed on Cole's Island, at the foot of James Island, nine miles from Charleston. This regiment was part of the Eighteenth Army Corps, and may be considered the pioneer of the grand expedition against Charleston. A reconnoissance of the island disclosed a Confederate battery near the end of the causeway that leads from Cole's Island to James Island, and also evidences of numerous concealed works on Folly and James Islands, where the Confederates had gathered a very large force. We will briefly describe the topography of this scene of action. John's Island is to the southwest of James Island, and may be said to include Seabrook and Cole's Island, which are only separated from it by a sort of marshy bayou, which at times is almost emptied of water."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Advance upon Charleston

"The advance upon Charleston, S. C.- pioneer movement- landing of the One Hundredth New York Volunteers…

"General McPherson entering Clinton, Miss. To facilitate the movements of the Federal armies near Chattanooga and divert the Confederate forces from hastening to the relief of Bragg. General McPherson marched from Vicksburg on the 15th of October, 1863. On the 17th he came up with the enemy in a strong position on the Canton Road, ten miles beyond Brownsville, and after a short, sharp fight, routed them, the Federals charging gallantly over the bridge and through the tall grass and corn to the enemy's line. The next day he entered Clinton, on the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad. His gallant troops broke the Sabbath stillness of the place as they marched in, and the Confederates scattered on all sides in flight. General McPherson then proceeded to Canton, and finally returned to Vicksburg after destroying Confederate mills and factories, and alarming all the neighboring stations."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Entering Clinton

"General McPherson entering Clinton, Miss. To facilitate the movements of the Federal armies near Chattanooga…

Evacuation of Corinth, Mississippi- Confederate fortifications, from the northern angle, looking south- pursuit of the retreating Confederates by the Federal Cavalry under General Smith. The details of the evacuation of Corinth, by Beauregard, beyond those contained in the official reports of General Halleck, were that Beauregard's force did not exceed 60,000 men. Nobody was left in town except women and children and old men; everything was taken away except a few provisions, which were burned. They did not leave a single gun, and had been moving their stores for two weeks, and their troops for six days. Their fortifications were five miles long, extending from the Memphis and Charleston to the Mobile and Ohio Roads. But they were much weaker than supposed. They could have been carried by storm at any time.

Evacuation of Corinth

Evacuation of Corinth, Mississippi- Confederate fortifications, from the northern angle, looking south-…

Evacuation of Corinth, Mississippi- burning of stations, warehouses and supplies- entry of Federal Troops. Corinth was not demolished, but it was very much deteriorated- about as bad as the Corinth of old. In the town the scene was dismal indeed; nothing was occupied, all was vacant. In the fields north of the town, where the Confederate camps had been, there were the common evidences of their late presence, but nothing uncommon. Arms were picked up in all parts of the field, and a few hundred prisoners were taken.

Evacuation of Corinth

Evacuation of Corinth, Mississippi- burning of stations, warehouses and supplies- entry of Federal Troops.…

"Burning of the gunpowder Creek Railroad Bridge, on the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad, by the Maryland Secessionists." —Leslie, 1896

Creek Railroad Bridge

"Burning of the gunpowder Creek Railroad Bridge, on the Philadelphia and Baltimore Railroad, by the…

"Cutting the levees near the state line of Louisiana and Arkansas, twenty miles above Lake Providence, by order of General Grant. War calls upon men imperatively to do many things which seem most inhuman, and only justified on the ground of being a choice of evils. Our sketch represents one of those painful acts, the cutting of the levees, near the State line of Louisiana and Arkansas. The scene our artist has sketched is about twenty miles above Lake Providence, which is now connected with the Mississippi by a canal dug by the Federal troops, under General McPherson's command, whose headquarters was on the shore of this beautiful lake. Mr. Lovie said, in his letter to us: 'The soil is very tough, and will not wash away. The levees consequently have to be blown up with gunpowder. The soil is then loosened with spades. On the spot which I sketch, about half a mile has been removed and the water covers the ground to the depth of ten feet, and steamboats now run in to Bayou Macon.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Cutting Levees

"Cutting the levees near the state line of Louisiana and Arkansas, twenty miles above Lake Providence,…

The New York Draft Riots (July 11 to July 16, 1863), were violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War.

The Draft Riots - The Rioters and the 7th Regiment

The New York Draft Riots (July 11 to July 16, 1863), were violent disturbances in New York City that…

Rioting in New York City after passage of an unpopular draft.

The Draft Riots in New York - The Battle in Second Avenue

Rioting in New York City after passage of an unpopular draft.

"Blowing out of the bulkhead of the Dutch Gap Canal, James River, Va., January 1st, 1865. At twelve minutes before four o'clock A. M., the mine was sprung, in the presence of General Butler and staff. A dense black smoke, at first immediately following the upheaval of the earth, was succeeded by a ponderous cloud of white smoke, which entirely filled the gap and concealed the result of the scheme. On rolling away it revealed the bank settled again into nearly its former position, but indented with a species of crater, into which the water ran slowly from the canal below. No connection between the canal and the river was immediately established, although as we have intimated, the disturbace of the embankment disposed it suitably for the gradual action of the current, and lightened the subsequent labors of the gang."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Dutch Gap Canal

"Blowing out of the bulkhead of the Dutch Gap Canal, James River, Va., January 1st, 1865. At twelve…

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's Ferry, on the night of October 23rd, 1861. Of the 1,900 Federals who crossed the river in the morning but a sad remnant reached the island and opposite shore on that awful night. Upward of 500 were taken prisoners; more than 100 were drowned; nearly the same number were killed on the field or shot in the retreat, and upward of 200 were wounded. We shrink from detailing all the incidents of horror which marked this most disastrous action and retreat. It was a fearful blunder from beginning to end. Our illustration represents the successful retreat to the Maryland shore on the night of Wednesday, October 23rd, by moonlight, during a high, cold windstorm." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Edward's ferry

"Successful retreat of the Federal troops from the Virginia shore across a canal-boat bridge at Edward's…

From the painting, "First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln" by Francis Bicknell Carpenter. From left to right: Edwin Stanton (Secretary of War), Salmon Chase (Secretary of the Treasury), Abraham Lincoln (President of the United States), Gideon Welles (Secretary of the Navy), Caleb B. Smith (Secretary of the Interior), William Seward [sitting] (Secretary of State), Montgomery Blair (Postmaster General), and Edward Bates (Attorney General).

Emancipation Proclamation

From the painting, "First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln" by Francis…

"The siege of Charleston, engineer depot, Morris Island, S. C."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Engineer Depot

"The siege of Charleston, engineer depot, Morris Island, S. C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Preparing the prisoner for execution- putting on the black robe."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

execution preparations

"Preparing the prisoner for execution- putting on the black robe."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Explosion of 3,000 musket cartridges in a tent at Fort Totten, New Berne, N. C., the headquarters of the Third New York Artillery. Our correspondent wrote: 'There is a great carelessness in the handling of munitions of war, of which we have just had a proof in our camp. Thinking to blow the flies from the tent by flashing powder- a common practice a spark caught a box of three thousand musket cartridges, thereby causing a tremendous explosion, which wounded four men (two dangerously) and blew the tent to atoms.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Explosion

"Explosion of 3,000 musket cartridges in a tent at Fort Totten, New Berne, N. C., the headquarters of…

"Federal troops marching back into Falmouth after the Battle of Chancellorsville."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Falmouth

"Federal troops marching back into Falmouth after the Battle of Chancellorsville."— Frank Leslie,…

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday, July 8th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, Va." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Review of Federal Army

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday,…

"The Federal Kitchen on the march to Fredericksburg with three days' rations." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal Kitchen

"The Federal Kitchen on the march to Fredericksburg with three days' rations." — Frank Leslie,…

"Federal Volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington on a bridge of coal boats, constructed for the occasion, on their way to defend Kentucky from the Confederates under General Kirby Smith, September 5th, 1862. The Confederate army under command of General Kirby Smith was variously estimated from 15,000 to 30,000 men. They were poorly clad, but well armed, and considering their organization were tolerably well disciplined. Their officers were bitter desperadoes, and they united in their expressed determination to pillage Cincinnati, against which city they pretended to have some terrible grudge to settle. General Kirby Smith, the Confederate commander, was much trusted by his troops, and was a cool and daring leader. Our sketch represents the Federal volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington to defend Kentucky."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federals Crossing

"Federal Volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington on a bridge of coal boats, constructed for…

"The siege of Petersburg- the Fifth Corps awaiting the order to advance, July 30th, 1864."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fifth Corps

"The siege of Petersburg- the Fifth Corps awaiting the order to advance, July 30th, 1864."— Frank…

"Scene of the first bloodshed, at Baltimore."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

first bloodshed

"Scene of the first bloodshed, at Baltimore."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Farmers and soldiers having a foraging party during the Civil War.

Foraging Party

Farmers and soldiers having a foraging party during the Civil War.

Groups of people gathered on the shores of a river.

Fort Donelson After Its Surrender

Groups of people gathered on the shores of a river.

"Surrender of Fort Macon, GA., April 26th, 1862- lowering the Confederate flag."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Macon

"Surrender of Fort Macon, GA., April 26th, 1862- lowering the Confederate flag."— Frank Leslie,…

Fort Pulaski was prepared for a possible infantry attack. However, Fort Pulaski never endured a direct land assault. With 36 guns, including the new James Rifled Cannon, Union troops began a long sustained bombardment of Fort Pulaski.

Breach in Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski was prepared for a possible infantry attack. However, Fort Pulaski never endured a direct…

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate army- their enthusiastic reception by the inhabitants, September 12th, 1862. Most certainly it was distance that lent enchantment to the view of the eyes of the Marylanders, so far as the Confederate army was concerned, for it appeared that, instead of 50,000 recruits so confidently predicted by Mr. Miles, one of the Confederate Congress of Richmond, they did not actually realize more then 700, and of these nearly 300 refused to carry out their enlistments. All accounts proved that the Confederate army was of the Felstaffian regime, and not at all calculated to make a favorable impression upon the olfactory and pecuniary faculties of the Secessionists of Maryland. When the Confederate generals, with their staffs, entered Frederick City, they were at first welcomed, but when the ragged regiments made their appearance a change came over the spirit of their dream, and the inhabitants woke from their delusion. Our sketch reprsents the rapturous reception given to Gneral McClellan. It was a perfect ovation. Flowers were showered down upon the Federals, while the waving of flags and the cheers of the inhabitants completed the inspiring scene." —Leslie, 1896

Frederick City

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate…

"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit of General Price." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Freemont's troops

"Gathering of Fremont's troops on the prairie, near Tipton, Mo., on the eve of its departure in pursuit…

"The funeral cortege, at boston, Mass., of the Sixth Massachusetts soldiers killed at Baltimore. The funeral of the four soldiers of the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment who were killed in Baltimore, April 19th, 1861, while en route to Washington, was held at Boston, May 1st. The bodies were received in the city by a military escort under Governor Andrew and Adjutant General Schouler, accompanied by a large concourse of citizens, and were temporarily deposited in the vaults of King's Chapel. The names of these 'first martyrs' were Luther C. Ladd, Addison O. Whitney, Charles A. Taylor and Sumner H. Needham. The Legislature of Maryland, on March 5th, 1862, appropriated seven thousand dollars, to be dispensed, under the direction of the Governor of Massachusetts, for the relief of the families of those who were killed and injured."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Funeral Cortege

"The funeral cortege, at boston, Mass., of the Sixth Massachusetts soldiers killed at Baltimore. The…

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie, 1896

March of General Banks

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie,…

"The campaign in Georgia- Federal troops foraging near Warsaw Sound."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Georgia Campaign

"The campaign in Georgia- Federal troops foraging near Warsaw Sound."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The Grand Review at Washington, D. C., May 24th, 1865- President Johnson, Lieutenant General Grant and others inspecting Sherman's army- Sherman saluting at the head of his staff."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Review

"The Grand Review at Washington, D. C., May 24th, 1865- President Johnson, Lieutenant General Grant…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from the Federal troops. When General Brannan made his daring and successful dash upon the railroad between Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie the terror both in Savannah and Charleston was very great. Despite the fact that General Beauregard with thirty thousand troops was stationed midway between the cities a restless desire for flight took possession of thousands, and for three days the roads to the interior were crowded with as miscellaneous a group as that which marched into Noah's ark. Lieutenant Kirby, of the Forty-seventh Massachusetts Regiment, being then a prisoner, had an excellent opportunity of sketching this motley stream of humanity. But our sketch renders all further description unnecessary."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Grand Skedaddle

"The 'Grand Skedaddle' of the inhabitants from Charleston, S. C., when threatened by an attack from…

The meeting of Generals Grant and Lee at Appomattox.

Grant and Lee

The meeting of Generals Grant and Lee at Appomattox.

In light of overwhelming enemy strength and the relatively heavy casualties his army suffered in the Battle of Bentonville, Johnston surrendered to Sherman little more than a month later at Bennett Place, near Durham Station.

Johnston's Surrender

In light of overwhelming enemy strength and the relatively heavy casualties his army suffered in the…

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- excitement at Convington- gathering of armed Federal citizens at the railroad and telegraph office, on hearing of the capture of Cynthiana by the Confederate Morgan. The dash of Morgan from his mountain haunts in Tennessee through Kentucky caused considerable alarm throughout the State, for it was well planned and boldly executed. It is said to have been an inspiration from Jeff Davis himself, intended to produce a general uprising in Kentucky against the Federal Government. The people, however, soon recovered from their momentary terror; and it was then seen how much stronger the Federal sentiment was in Kentucky than that of Secession." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid Rally

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- excitement at Convington- gathering of armed Federal citizens at…

"The Federal Army, under General Pope, landing on the Kentucky Shore, opposite New Madrid, April 1st, 1862. New Madrid was the scene of one of the most remarkable exploits in military annals- the capture of six thousand men and an immense store of arms and munitions of war on an adjacent island, which had been elaborately fortified. New Madrid is situated on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, and possessed a large business in cattle, corn and lumber for the Southern market at the commencement of the war. It is about forty miles below Columbus, and sixty miles from Cairo, and about eight miles from the far-famous Island No. 10. These distances are calculated by the winding of the river. It was first settled in 1780, and gradually grew larger till 1812, when the great earthquake nearly destroyed it."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Shore

"The Federal Army, under General Pope, landing on the Kentucky Shore, opposite New Madrid, April 1st,…

"The Army of the Potomac- scene at the Crossing of Kettle Run."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Kettle Run

"The Army of the Potomac- scene at the Crossing of Kettle Run."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Captain Bailey, bearing a flag of truce, put off in a boat, accompanied by Lieutenant George H. Perkins, with a demand for the surrender of the city, as well as for the immediate substitution of the Federal for the Confederate ensign. They stepped ashore and made their way to the city Hall through a motley crowd, which kept cheering for the South and Jefferson Davis, and uttering groans and hisses for President Lincoln and the "Yankee" fleet.

Landing of Captain Bailey and Lieutenant Perkins in New Orleans

Captain Bailey, bearing a flag of truce, put off in a boat, accompanied by Lieutenant George H. Perkins,…

"Advance of General Rosecrans's division through the forests of Laurel Hill to attack the Confederate intrenchments at Rich Mountain. General McClellan's plan for attacking the Confederates under General Garnett in Western Virginia and driving them beyond the Alleghanies involved the surprise of a large body strongly intrenched at Rich Mountain, in a position commanding the turnpike over Laurel Hill. He detailed General Rosecrans to surprise them. This in turn involved a circuitous march through the dense forests of Laurel Hill, over a wild nd broken country. General Rosecrans's column of 1,600 men was guided by a woddsman named David L. Hart, who described the march as follows: "We started at daylight, and I led, accompanied by Colonel Lander, through a pathless wood, obstructed by bushes, laurels, fallen timber and rocks, followed by the whole division in perfect silence. It ended in the utter rout and final capture of the Confederates under Colonel Pegram, with a loss of 150 killed and 300 wounded." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Laurel Hill

"Advance of General Rosecrans's division through the forests of Laurel Hill to attack the Confederate…

General leaving after the surrender of the American Civil War.

General Lee Leaving After the Surrender

General leaving after the surrender of the American Civil War.