Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Shut Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Shut Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Shut Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Shut Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

1) The first or index finger. 2) The second or middle finger. 3) The third finger. 4) The fourth finger. 5) The finger's first or lower phalanx. 8) The thumb's second or breath phalanx. 9) The thumb's terminal or voice phalanx. 10) The Palm. 11) The wrist.

Explanatory Diagram

1) The first or index finger. 2) The second or middle finger. 3) The third finger. 4) The fourth finger.…

One of the extremities of the hand, not including the thumb.

Finger

One of the extremities of the hand, not including the thumb.

A pair of hands with palms facing outwards and intertwined fingers pointing upwards.

Intertwined fingers

A pair of hands with palms facing outwards and intertwined fingers pointing upwards.

The hand with the fingers doubled into the palm.

Fist

The hand with the fingers doubled into the palm.

An illustration of two hands about to touch with the top of the hand facing outward.

Fruit Basket

An illustration of two hands about to touch with the top of the hand facing outward.

A young girl clapping her hands.

Girl Clapping

A young girl clapping her hands.

A girl standing with her hands to her face, crying.

Girl Crying

A girl standing with her hands to her face, crying.

A girl standing with her arm in front of her, pointing at something.

Girl Pointing

A girl standing with her arm in front of her, pointing at something.

A girl standing with her hands at her shoulders.

Girl Standing

A girl standing with her hands at her shoulders.

A girl standing with her hands straight out in the air.

Girl Standing

A girl standing with her hands straight out in the air.

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Back-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized back primary consonant.

Back-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Back Mixed-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized back Mixed consonant.

Back Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperture consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Breath-Glide - A transitional aspiration, of organic quality corresponding to that of the adjoining elements [a soft effect of the Consonants, back primary; top primary; Point primary; Lip primary; etc.]. Although this glide has no fixed abiding place, and is of a somewhat variable organic formation, in its effect it is very closely allied to the Throat consonant aspirate, and is therefore represented with a posterior position of the palm and a separation of the index and center fingers, which are characteristic features of Throat positions. This is the only Non-Vocal glide, and hence is the only one in the representation of which the voice phalanx is unaccented.

Breath-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented. Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers. Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated High Primary Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Primary Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Primary Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Primary Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated High Wide Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Wide Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Wide Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated High Wide Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Low Primary Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers. Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Primary Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Primary Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.   Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers. Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Low Primary Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Low Wide Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Wide Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Wide Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Low Wide Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Mid Primary Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Primary Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Primary Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Mid Primary Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Mid Wide Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Wide Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Wide Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Mid Wide Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. Lip-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Lip primary consonant.

Lip-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Lip Mixed-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Lip Mixed consonant.

Lip Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Point-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Point primary consonant.

Point-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions.

Point Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Round-Glide &ndash; Rounded murmur [a non-syllabic effect of the mid Mixed primary round vowel]. This also is a Throat formation, and is represented by a position which suggests an unrepresented Vocalized Throat Mixed consonant.

Round-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Throat-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Throat primary consonant.

Throat-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Top-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized top primary consonant.

Top-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions.

Top Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Voice-Glide &ndash; Vowel murmur [a non-syllabic effect of the mid Mixed primary round vowel]. It is a Throat formation, and is shown to be so by the position which represents it.

Voice-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

A cover for the hand, with a separate sheath for each finger.

Glove

A cover for the hand, with a separate sheath for each finger.

This illustration shows a glove from the time of Napoleon I.

Glove from the Time of Napoleon I

This illustration shows a glove from the time of Napoleon I.

This illustration shows the glove of Oliver Cromwell, a 17th century English military and political leader.

Glove of Oliver Cromwell

This illustration shows the glove of Oliver Cromwell, a 17th century English military and political…

Hand with wand.

Hand

Hand with wand.

Hand with deck of cards.

Hand

Hand with deck of cards.

Hand writing with pencil.

Hand

Hand writing with pencil.

Hand drawing with chalk.

Hand

Hand drawing with chalk.

Hand holding a match.

Hand

Hand holding a match.

Hands holding two matches.

Hand

Hands holding two matches.

The outer extremity of the human arm, consisting of the palm and fingers.

Hand

The outer extremity of the human arm, consisting of the palm and fingers.